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by Jakob Bohme,Peter Erb,Winfried Zeller

eBook Jacob Boehme: The Way to Christ (The Classics of Western spirituality) download ISBN: 0809102374
Author: Jakob Bohme,Peter Erb,Winfried Zeller
Publisher: Paulist Press; 1st Edition edition (June 1, 1978)
Language: English
Pages: 307
ePub: 1635 kb
Fb2: 1346 kb
Rating: 4.3
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Category: Religious
Subcategory: Other Religions Practices and Sacred Texts

Jakob Boehme (Böhme; 1575-1624) was a German Lutheran mystic and theologian, whom Nicolas Berdyaev called "one of the greatest of Christian gnostics.

Jakob Boehme (Böhme; 1575-1624) was a German Lutheran mystic and theologian, whom Nicolas Berdyaev called "one of the greatest of Christian gnostics. Christian piety begins with repentance, that is, with self-understanding in which man comes to know the unfathomable self-seeking at the base of his being

Evelyn Underhill called the German Lutheran Mystic Jacob Boehme 'one of the most astonishing cases in history of a. .Boehme was the son of a farmer who lived the first part of his life as a shepherd and later became a shoemaker.

Evelyn Underhill called the German Lutheran Mystic Jacob Boehme 'one of the most astonishing cases in history of a natural genius for the transcendent. He claimed that his writings reflect only what he was taught through the direct experience of God. A truly giant figure in the spiritual tradition, he has greatly influenced Angelus Silesius, William Blake, John Milton, Isaac Newton, William Law, and many others.

Boehme, Jacob (Erb, Peter C., Trans. and Intro This is a NEW book from the Bangor Theological Seminary Bookstore; Classics of Western Spirituality Series; . x . Inches. Published by Paulist Press International,U. ISBN 10: 0809121026 ISBN 13: 9780809121021. This is a NEW book from the Bangor Theological Seminary Bookstore; Classics of Western Spirituality Series; . Seller Inventory 41534. More information about this seller Contact this seller.

The Way to Christ book  .

By Jacob Boehme, Peter Erb. No cover image. By Jacob Boehme, Peter Erb. During the night of August 2, 1759 in Freudenberg, West Germany, a nineteen-year-old youth left his father's home and country since he had been forbidden to read Boehme's The Way to Christ.

by Jacob Behmen Jakob Boehme 15751624.

Jakob Böhme (/ˈbeɪmə, ˈboʊ-/; German: ; 24 April 1575 – 17 November 1624) was a German philosopher, Christian mystic, and Lutheran Protestant theologian. He was considered an original thinker by many of his contemporaries within the Lutheran. He was considered an original thinker by many of his contemporaries within the Lutheran tradition, and his first book, commonly known as Aurora, caused a great scandal.

Böhme, Jakob, 1575-1624: The Confessions of Jacob Boehme (London: Methuen and C. c1920), ed. by M. E. Dowson, contrib. Böhme, Jakob, 1575-1624: The Way to Christ (HTML at CCEL). multiple formats at archive. Böhme, Jakob, 1575-1624: The Epistles of Jacob Behmen (London: Printed by Matthew Simmons, 1649), trans. by John Ellistone (multiple formats at archive. Böhme, Jakob, 1575-1624: The Works of Jacob Behmen, the Teutonic Theosopher (4 volumes; London: Printed for M. Richardson, 1764-1781), contrib. by William Law. Volume I: multiple formats at archive.

Peter C Erb; Jakob Bohme. Book Format: Choose an option. Classics of Western Spirituality (Paperback). This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Jacob Boehme : The Way to Christ. Peter C Erb; Jakob Bohme. Peter C Erb. ISBN-13.

Jacob Boehme: The Way to Christ by Jacob Boehme. Peter C. Erb is professor of religion and culture at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Canada. He earned his PhD from Toronto University. Johann Arndt: True Christianity by Johann Arndt. Jacob Boehme (1575–1624) was a German Christian mystic and theologian. He is considered an original thinker within the Lutheran tradition, and his first book, commonly known as Aurora, caused a great scandal. The Theologia Germanica of Martin Luther.

Book by Jakob Bohme
Comments: (4)
Punind
bSo i bought this thinking it was a beginners book. i have read paulist press books before and liked them a lot . But this was no easy task. i have read excerpts and quotes by boehme but nothing total. so i went on amazon to find something
i was new to Jacob Boehme this seemed the cheapist book on him and the first that came up and somewhat popular as well . But be warned its not easy . Also i think its a late work by him .
Its good for what it is , but at the time i didnt get it at all . So i would suggest reading his early work first! Also i found this book a much better introduction being selections and commentary of his work Jacob Boehme (Western Esoteric Masters) and another book " the key to jacob boehme " The Key of Jacob Boehme (Studies in Historical Theology)
Blackstalker
Purchased this to add to my Classics of Western Spirituality collection. When I get around to reading it, probably years from now, I'll probably review it then.
Kearanny
Whenever I have tried to read Boehme, I am often quite perplexed. I am not really sure if he is a Gnostic visionary in the same sort of mold as William Blake (or perhaps Valentinus), if he is an alchemist or an astrologer like Paracelsus or Cornelius Agrippa, or a genuine Christian mystic.

Boehme is clearly a genius, and also a visionary of first rank. However his obscurity in terms of symbolism and expression, his disorganisation in argument and logic, and the sheer scope of his visions and their diversity make him very hard to follow.

I think it is best to see Boehme as a kind of theosophist. In this sense, his approach to the divine is deeply mythical and also involves a syncreticism of ideas taken from many areas. In this sense, Boehme is far more in my view a Gnostic or Gnostic Christian than a Christian mystic.

Gnosticism is very different from Christian mysticism, particularly in its extreme focus on inner visions of spiritual realities and its application of mythical categories to the entire realm of experience. While these elements exist in Christian mysticism, they are always downplayed or regulated by Christian tradition and certain rules and counsels for spiritual direction. As a reading of Boehme and other Gnostic scriptures would show, the problem with unfettered visions is that they soon become so obscure and involved in radical allegory and myth that they bear little or no resemblance to their original source. In this sense such a mysticism can never serve as a mysticism for an organised religion like Christianity, which requires some adherence to tradition and authority.

However as a Gnostic and creative visionary Boehme is certainly at his most brilliant. His conception of God is soaring and contains great originality and profundity, and it is not for no reason other great mystics, writers and philosophers (such as William Law, Evelyn Underhill, Berdayev or Hegel) have found in his writings ideas of great fertility.

The most daring of Bohme's ideas is certainly those of God as the fathomless 'ungrund' or 'abyss.' Like Kabbala, the abyss is a sort of infinite nothingness which is totally silent, ineffable and incomprehensible. Somehow this abyss however, which is nothing, desires to manifest itself as something. So the abyss somehow fragments into nothingness into somethingness, from one into many. In Boehme's mysticism the Ungrund manifests itself as the holy Trinity and also through a female figure, Sophia, or divine wisdom. God the Father is a figure containing wrath or burning fire, the fires of judgement and pain. The Father is balanced by the spirit and the Son, and also by wisdom, who also unfold somehow in a 'sevenfold' way into the created universe.

The other aspect of Boehme's mysticism is that of the fall of the devil and of mankind. For Boehme, humanity and also the devil originally enjoyed a perfect existence in a spiritual world, which was effectively all God (since in the spirit realm all is essentially in God and there is no real multiplicity), but by turning from God's will to his own will, and trying to create himself, the devil, followed by man, turned God's love into fire and wrath which led to their exile to our existence in this world. However the unfolding of this world and of the Godhead itself is not just a projection of eternal timeless reality onto a world of change, but the spiritual world changes like the 'real' world and vice versa, and both are intimately connected. Boehme searched for the nature of these connections and turned to the mystical and magical systems of alchemist-astrologer occultists like Agrippa and Paracelsus, which unfortunately hopelessly obscures so much of Boehme's mystical writings and his underlying themes. The progress of the world and of man to salvation is bound up with the way God heals himself and rebalances himself through the manifestation of the son, Christ, and through the incarnation, and also in the last judgement.

For Boehme, like many other Gnostics, this world contains great evil and change and this is due to spiritual catastrophe. There is also a divine female figure (Sophia or other female spirit beings called aeons exist in other Gnostic systems) and there is also evil and good, love and fire, change and timelessness, will and becoming, inside the very Godhead itself or at least in the manifestation of the Godhead into 'God.' Boehme's system also shares many similarities with kabbalah, particularly Lurianic kabbalah, however the extent to which his system was influenced by this is debateable.

I think for many students of mysticism Boehme will be very hard to follow, especially given the obscure way he expresses himself. Nevertheless he is a great Gnostic, and for anyone interested in religion his works do contain some profound though bizarre insights.
Granigrinn
Jakob Boehme (Böhme; 1575-1624) was a German Lutheran mystic and theologian, whom Nicolas Berdyaev called "one of the greatest of Christian gnostics." The Preface to this 1978 book notes, "As his book indicates... Christian piety begins with repentance, that is, with self-understanding in which man comes to know the unfathomable self-seeking at the base of his being."

He wrote, "We have neither pen nor words to write or to tell what the sweet grace of God in Christ's humanity is, and what happens to those who are worthy to come to the marriage of the lamb, which we in our own way have experienced, and which we know, so that we have a true ground for our writings. We have shared this gladly with our brothers for the love of Christ." (Pg. 70)

He explains, "I do not say that man is not to study and learn in the natural arts. No, this is useful to him, but his own reason is not to be the beginning. Man is to... set The Spirit and will of God at the beginning of all his studies... The more reason sinks into absurd humility before God... (the more) it may see the great wonders of God." (Pg. 122) Later, he suggests that "The Father's love to Christ consists of willing, but true life consists of doing." (Pg. 157)

He argues that a Christian "has no sect... He has only a single knowledge and that is Christ in him. He seeks only one way, which is the desire always eagerly to act and live correctly." (Pg. 164) He asserts that "The whole Christian religion consists in this: [firstly] that we learn to know ourselves... secondly, where we were in unity when we were the children of God; thirdly, how we now are in disunity, in strife and antagonism; fourthly, where we are to go out of this fragile life." (Pg. 167) He observes that "It often happens that the holiest souls become thus covered and melancholy. God often allows this to happen so that they might be tested and strive for the noble conquerer's crown." (Pg. 261)

This is an attractive edition of this justly revered work.