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eBook Popular witchcraft, straight from the witch's mouth download

by Jack Fritscher

eBook Popular witchcraft, straight from the witch's mouth download ISBN: 0879720263
Author: Jack Fritscher
Publisher: Bowling Green University Popular Press; 1St Edition edition (1972)
Language: English
Pages: 123
ePub: 1506 kb
Fb2: 1447 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lit azw doc lrf
Category: Religious
Subcategory: New Age and Spirituality

Jack Fritscher sifts through legends of sorcery and the twisted history of witchcraft, including the casting of spells and incantations, with a focus on the growing role of witchcraft in popular culture and its mainstream commercialization through popular music, Broadway.

Jack Fritscher sifts through legends of sorcery and the twisted history of witchcraft, including the casting of spells and incantations, with a focus on the growing role of witchcraft in popular culture and its mainstream commercialization through popular music, Broadway, Hollywood, and politics.

Jack Fritscher is the author of fifteen books and hundreds of articles on American popular culture.

Popular Witchcraft book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Popular Witchcraft: Straight from the Witch's Mouth as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The pseudo-Satanist or pseudo-witch or self-styled mystic who predicates his success on a drug revelation is only going to succeed . Popular Witchcraft: Straight from the Witch's Mouth by Jack Fritscher ISBN: 978-0299203009.

The pseudo-Satanist or pseudo-witch or self-styled mystic who predicates his success on a drug revelation is only going to succeed within his drugged peer group. His miracles go no further than his credibility. This type of witchery is limited. This, I say, despite the fact that the druggies are no longer just a marginal group, but are a very large subculture which threatens to be the New Spirituality or the New Mysticism or the New Non-Materialism. They don’t realize the whole concept of witchery is manipulation of other human beings.

Fritscher, Jack (2004). Popular Witchcraft: Straight from the Witch's Mouth (2 e. University of Wisconsin Press/Popular Press. Fritscher, Jack (1971). Liskowski, Tom Hogan. Chicago, IL: Claretian Fathers/Claretian Press.

Popular Witchcraft: Straight from the Witch s Mouth, inspired by the British Gerald Gardner s Witchcraft Today, was the first book to be published on popular American witchcraft and remains the classic survey of white and black magic.

Popular Witchcraft: Straight from the Witch's Mouth, inspired by the British Gerald Gardner's Witchcraft Today, was the first book to be published on popular American witchcraft and remains the classic survey of white and black magic. Jack Fritscher sifts through legends of sorcery and the twisted history of witchcraft, including the casting of spells and incantations, with a focus on the growing role of witchcraft in popular culture and its mainstream commercialization through popular music, Broadway, Hollywood, and politics. As seriously historical as it is fun to read, there is no other book like it.

Professor Fritscher interviewed scores of practicing witches, and the book includes remarkably .

Professor Fritscher interviewed scores of practicing witches, and the book includes remarkably candid statements by such prominent figures in the witchcraft movement as Dr. Leo Louis Martello, Frederick de Arechaga, and Anton LaVey, the present doyen of American witches. This is a work which sifts through the legends of sorcery and witchcraft, not neglecting its lores and legends, including the casting of spells and incantations

Jack Fritscher was ordained an exorcist in the Catholic Church in 1963, but by the late 1960s he had become interested in the occult and counterculture scene in San Francisco.

Jack Fritscher was ordained an exorcist in the Catholic Church in 1963, but by the late 1960s he had become interested in the occult and counterculture scene in San Francisco. The book beings by reprinting a 1971 interview with Anton Szandor LaVey, founder of the San Francisco–based Church of Satan, that now is little more than a time-capsule piece. The first real chapter addresses witchcraft and the law, and is the most historical part of the book, if such a term can be applied to this mishmash of misconstrued information wrenched from any meaningful context

Popular Witchcraft is a book that challenges many common pagan stereotypes and prejudices (by which I mean .

Popular Witchcraft is a book that challenges many common pagan stereotypes and prejudices (by which I mean stereotypes and prejudices commonly held by pagans). It is by turns challenging, subversive, scandalous, honest, joyful, and always acutely insightful. In 1969, he described witchcraft a. art of the liberation movements of sex, race and gender that are transforming American popular culture. Fritscher depicts both witchcraft’s transformative effect on popular culture and its simultaneous exploitation by the popular media.

Book by Jack Fritscher
Comments: (3)
Zainn
The interview with LaVey and Frederic De Arechaga are worth it alone.
blodrayne
Originally published in 1972, the second edition of Dr. Jack Fritscher's "Popular Witchcraft; Straight From The Witch's Mouth" is an intriguing read on many levels. Probably the most important is that, in this edition, Dr. Fritscher's notorious interview with the late Church of Satan founder Anton LaVey is published in full. LaVey is said to have thought this was his favorite published interview, and it is easy to see why. Dr. Fritscher allowed LaVey free range on a number of topics without condescending to the topic or gunning for the sensationalist angle. LaVey, relaxed by the situation, expounds on topics ranging from Governmental manipulation of minorities throughout history to why he thought Tuesday Weld was the perfect woman.

Then, towards the end of the book. Dr Fritscher prints out the text of interviews he'd conducted with other witches during the course of researching "Popular Witchcraft." These offer the most insight, as each of the interview subjects touch on topics most pertinent to them (and their thoughts on other witches, who, in LaVey's terms, are almost like rock stars). Out of the remaining interviews, the most interesting is Sabaean Pontifex Maximus Frederic De Arechaga. (Who, in Firstcher's terms, is a 'handful.')

In the book's meaty midsection, the topic of how witchcraft and all things mystic have infiltrated the modern world is laid out with a dizzying array of interconnecting pop cultural circumstances and historical facts. The main interlocking premise of which seems to state that gays and witches are primarily in the same boat. As oppressed minorities, both groups find themselves banished, censored and otherwise oppressed and scapegoated. Be they new agers, Satanists, Old Religion or QueerEvil eyes for the straight guys, you can always count on the eventual fear factor to come in with the censor scissors.

To that end, "Popular Witchcraft" is both important historically and seriously fun. After all, where else are you going to read about how witchcraft touches everyone from Andy Warhol to William Shatner?
Falya
Love jacks writing. Just finished his book Mapplethorpe - Assualt with a deadly camera. Great book. Jack is a different kind of writer. Very interesting. I would buy this book but not on kindle. :( Trouble with my eyes and kindle works well for me. Please, Jack?