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by Robert Gordis

eBook Koheleth: The Man and His World - A Study of Ecclesiastes download ISBN: 0805201661
Author: Robert Gordis
Publisher: Schocken; Revised edition (January 1, 1987)
Language: English
Pages: 431
ePub: 1421 kb
Fb2: 1123 kb
Rating: 4.5
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Category: Religious
Subcategory: Judaism

He was Professor of the Bible at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America for eight years and an adjunct professor of religion at Columbia University. Indeed, every man who eats, drinks, and enjoys happiness in his work – that is the gift of God (3: 11-13) and the fate of men and the fate of beasts is the same (3:19) are overlooked because of misplaced pious reasons. Koheleth’s work opens and closes with his judgment of life, Vanity of vanities, all is vanity (1:2 and 12:8). The petty strivings of people are folly.

The biblical book of Koheleth (Ecclesiastes), which originated in the last centuries before the Christian era, is a basically heretical if not an altogether heretical work. Above all, it is a profoundly human book.

Originally published in 1951. The biblical book of Koheleth (Ecclesiastes), which originated in the last centuries before the Christian era, is a basically heretical if not an altogether heretical work. The unknown author has lost the faith of the Prophets in the victory of justice in the world and the belief that man can attain an Originally published in 1951.

Categories: Ecclesiastes Tags: Jewish. Pages: 404 pages Publisher: Jason Aronson Published: 1995 ISBN-10: 1568216017 ISBN-13: 9781568216010. Find at a Library Find at Google Books. NT Church History, Apostolic Period NT Extra-Biblical Literature Studies Jesus and the Gospels Synoptic Gospels and Surrounding Issues The Book of Acts in its First Century Setting Pauline Studies Johannine Studies Petrine Studies Lukan Studies. Other NT Studies and Issues.

Robert Gordis gives a very perceptive comparison between modem existentialism and Qoheleth in "Koheleth and Modern Existentialism," Koheleth-The Man and His World, A Study of Ecclesiastes (New York: Schocken, 1968).

6 Introduction to the Old Testament, trans. Why is the message of Ecclesiastes associated with Qohelet rather than with Solomon?

Texts And Studies Of The Jewish Theological Seminary Of America, V19. Specifications. Literary Licensing, LLC. Book Format. ENG. Number of Pages.

Similar books and articles. Koheleth - The Man and His World by Robert Gordis. Robert Gordis - 1961 - Santa Barbara, Calif The First Book of Maccabees by Solomon Zeitlin; Abraham A. Neuman; Sidney Tedesche; Aristeas to Philocrates by Moses Hadas. Solomon Gandz - 1952 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 43:58-58. Robert Gordis - 1961 - Santa Barbara, Calif. Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions. The Astrolabes of the World. Robert T. GuntherThe Astrolabes of the World Volume II. The Western Astrolabes. Alexander Pogo - 1934 - Isis 20 (2):492-495. The First Book of Maccabees by Solomon Zeitlin; Abraham A. Solomon Gandz - 1952 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 43:287-288. Added to PP index 2016-06-30.

I prefer the Robert Gordis translation: Koheleth, The Man and His World: A Study of Ecclesiastes, because it is the most worldly and philosophical. Additional Resources for Studying Ecclesiastes

I prefer the Robert Gordis translation: Koheleth, The Man and His World: A Study of Ecclesiastes, because it is the most worldly and philosophical. Additional Resources for Studying Ecclesiastes: Three Philosophies of Life: Ecclesiastes - Life as Vanity, Job - Life as Suffering, Song of Songs - Life as Love by Peter Kreeft. A Time to Be Born, A Time to Die: The Images and Insights of Ecclesiastes for Today by Robert Short.

Koheleth - the man and his world: a study of Ecclesiastes. Your reading intentions are private to you and will not be shown to other users. What are reading intentions? Setting up reading intentions help you organise your course reading. It makes it easy to scan through your lists and keep track of progress. Here's an example of what they look like: Your reading intentions are also stored in your profile for future reference. How do I set a reading intention.

This is the first full-length study of Ecclesiastes using methods of philosophical . Koheleth – The Man and His World. New York: Schocken, 1968.

This is the first full-length study of Ecclesiastes using methods of philosophical exegesis, specifically those of the modern French philosophers Levinas and Blanchot. Tony Perry has done it again.

Book by Robert Gordis
Comments: (4)
KiddenDan
Robert Gordis has written a complete, if not definitive, commentary on the Book of Ecclesiastes. He was Professor of the Bible at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America for eight years and an adjunct professor of religion at Columbia University. He gives Ecclesiastes a thorough literary, philosophical, and stylistic analysis against the background of both Hebrew and Near Eastern Wisdom literature in relation to Greek and Egyptian wisdom.
Rolling Flipper
Just what I needed for checking footnotes!
Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
This is a readable translation by a highly respected scholar of the biblical book Ecclesiastes, called Kohelet in Hebrew, with comprehensive explanations and extensive notes. Both names mean “collector” or collection.” It is a difficult book, usually misunderstood, often purposely. Dr. Gordis tells readers that “there is scarcely one aspect of the 222 verses [in the book], whether of dates, authorship or interpretation, that has not been the subject of wide differences of opinion.” Yet the book was extremely popular. No less than 122 out of the 222 verses in the book are quoted in rabbinic Talmudic and Midrashic sources, in whole or in part.
The “Jewish Midrashim and the Aramaic Targum [authoritative translation] saw in it the penitent reflections of a [King] Solomon grown worldly-wise and sorrowful in the evening of life.” In contrast, Church Fathers, also enamored by the book, “found in the book definite teachings of the Trinity and the Atonement.”
Gordis and most scholars are certain that Solomon was not the author of this book and “Koheleth [its author] may have lived between 500 BCE and 100 CE – no less a span than six centuries.”
True, the book begins by saying “the words of Koheleth the son of David, king in Jerusalem [but] the view that Solomon is the author has been universally abandoned today.” Scholars contend that the introductory sentence was attached to the book by a later editor who wanted to give this heterodox volume an aura of prestige and sanctity. This is also why this editor, or another editor like him, added a conclusion to the book saying, “In sum, having heard everything, fear God, and keep His commandments for that is man’s whole duty. For God will bring every deed to judgment, even everything hidden, whether it is good or evil.” This added ending is a non-sequetor, for the body of the book has an altogether different skeptical, non-traditional, hedonistic thrust.
We know little about Koheleth. In the last six verses of the book (12:9-14), the editor added that Koheleth was a wisdom teacher and a collector and composer of wisdom literature. He was from his earliest youth endowed with intellectual and emotional faculties that were exceptionally keen. He had a passionate love of life, and enjoyed the tang of living. He enthralled in the sight of the sun, the breath of the wind, and the good things available in this world. He loved material comfort, beauty, and women. He wrote: “Enjoy life with the woman you love” (9:9). Yet he pours out vials of bitterness against them, proof that he had loved and lost them or that he was a confirmed bachelor, for he wrote “I find woman more bitter than death, for her heart is full of traps and snares” (7:26). His yearning for justice and wisdom brought him sorrow and disillusion. Since justice and wisdom are unattainable, he concludes, contrary to the added end and contrary to the current Orthodox belief of life after death, that striving for happiness is the only reasonable goal of life. “For if a man live many years, let him rejoice in them all, and remember that the days of darkness will be many, and that everything thereafter is nothingness” (11:8).
Gordis tells readers that “The idea of a future life is passed over in silence in [the biblical book] Proverbs, probably because of the early date of its material [written before the idea of an after-life entered Judaism]. It is explicitly negated in Ben Sira, Job, and Koheleth.”
Many expressions in Koheleth are misunderstood or overlooked. For example: “Everything has its appointed time…A time to scatter stones and a time to gather them” (3:5) is a phrase having a sexual connotation. God has “placed the love of the world in men’s hearts…. I know that there is no other good in life but to be happy while one lives. Indeed, every man who eats, drinks, and enjoys happiness in his work – that is the gift of God” (3: 11-13) and “the fate of men and the fate of beasts is the same” (3:19) are overlooked because of misplaced pious reasons.
Koheleth’s work opens and closes with his judgment of life, “Vanity of vanities, all is vanity” (1:2 and 12:8). The petty strivings of people are folly. God endowed people with the desire for happiness, failure to enjoy God’s gift is ungrateful egregious rebellion.
Marr
This work contains a Hebrew text of Kohelet, an English translation and Gordis commentary. Gordis divides the work into theme -units and provides commentary on each. He makes the ideas of 'Koheleth' clear, however paradoxical they are.
For me 'Koheleth' has always been the most profound statement on human life imaginable. The man who advocates enjoying life on earth, while at the same time acknowledging the vanity of it, who rejects the world - to- come, and the justice of this world while urging our obedience to G-d gives a description and presciption of human life which it seems to me is not vanity of vanities, but instead for human beings so long as they are on this earth, eternal truth.