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eBook Tracing Back the Radiance: Chinul's Korean Way of Zen (Kuroda Classics in East Asian Buddhism) download

by Robert E. Buswell Jr.

eBook Tracing Back the Radiance: Chinul's Korean Way of Zen (Kuroda Classics in East Asian Buddhism) download ISBN: 0824814274
Author: Robert E. Buswell Jr.
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press; Later Printing edition (November 1, 1991)
Language: English
Pages: 246
ePub: 1410 kb
Fb2: 1170 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi lit lrf azw
Category: Religious
Subcategory: Buddhism

The book's ninety-eight page introduction, The Life and Thought of Chinul, traces the development of both Korean Zen and Chinul's awakening and thinking. The remainder of the book consists of Chinul's teachings.

Robert Evans Buswell Jr. is an American academic, author and scholar of. . is an American academic, author and scholar of Korean Buddhism and Chinese Buddhism as well as Korean religions in general. He is Professor of Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles and founding director of the Academy of Buddhist Studies (불교 학술원) at Dongguk University, Korea's main Buddhist university  . 1991: Tracing Back the Radiance: Chinul's Korean Way of Zen. Classics in East Asian Buddhism, no. 2. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, A Kuroda Institute Book.

Tracing Back the Radiance book.

Tracing Back the Radiance, an abridgment of Buswell s Korean .

Tracing Back the Radiance, an abridgment of Buswell s Korean Approach to Zen: The Collected Works of Chinul, combines an extensive introduction to Chinul s life and thought with translations of three of his most representative works. Kirjaluettelon tiedot.

Tracing Back the Radiance, an abridgment of Buswell?s Korean Approach to Zen: The Collected Works of Chinul, combines an extensive introduction to Chinul?s life and thought with translations of three of his most representative works. ISBN13:9780824814274. Release Date:November 1991.

Classics in East Asian Buddhism. Taehan Pulgyo Chogyejong - Early works to 1800.

Buswell, Robert E. Chinul, 1158-1210. Korean approach to Zen. Published. Honolulu : University of Hawaii Press, c1991. Classics in East Asian Buddhism. Zen Buddhism - Korea - Early works to 1800. Abridged ed. of: The Korean approach to Zen. "A Kuroda Institute book.

His books include The Zen Monastic Experience (Princeton, 1992), Tracing Back the Radiance: Chinul's Korean Way of Zen .

His books include The Zen Monastic Experience (Princeton, 1992), Tracing Back the Radiance: Chinul's Korean Way of Zen (Honolulu, 1991), The Formation of Chan Ideology in China and Korea (Princeton, 1989), Cultivating Original Enlightenment (Honolulu, 2007), and Religions of Korea in Practice (Princeton, 2007). Most recently, he is coauthor (with Donald S. Lopez, J. of the . -million-word Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism (Princeton, 2014).

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Chinul (1158–1210) was the founder of the Korean tradition of Zen. He provides one of the most lucid and accessible accounts of Zen practice and meditation to be found anywhere in East Asian literature. Tracing Back the Radiance, an abridgment of Buswell’s Korean Approach to Zen: The Collected Works of Chinul, combines an extensive introduction to Chinul’s life and thought with translations of three of his most representative works.
Comments: (7)
Broadraven
I am just now finishing this utterly astonishing book and after recommending it to all my Zen friends, I'd now like to recommend it to the general public. The introduction, though one of the longest I've encountered in Zen study, is of deep value in clarifying both the history and in-road psychological techniques of the earlier schools of Chan ( Niu-Tou, Ho-tse, Hung Chao, and "Northern"). Also, there is a richly specific comparison by Tsung-mi of both the benefit and the restriction of perspective that results from using these various psychological techniques that is truly invaluable. In particular for me, being a Zen student for over four decades, the explication of "numinous awareness" and its distinction from "numinous attention" was (and is) particularly riveting. But nearly every explication in this book carries similar significant import. The directness of idea and the return from so many different perspectives to the main focus of Zen practice and its goal-less goal is truly admirable, as is the artfulness in making such an abundance of subtle ideas so accessible. Lastly, Both Tsung-mi and Chinul return repeatedly to the
need to balance scriptural study and actual Zazen practice, which, particularly here in America, where formal study is so undervalued, is an essential reminder. I now view Robert E. Buswell Jr. as another of the current American translator-scholars worthy of practicing Buddhists' deepest gratitude. Obviously, I cannot recommend this book highly enough, in particular, to the Zen practitioner.
Blueshaper
I am a Zen practitioner at a zendo in the Korean lineage, and am sadly deficient in both practice and realization. I have a small library of books on Zen, most of them describing both the theory and practice of zazen. Many of them are difficult to understand when one gets down to the particulars of sitting to realize something that can only be described by analogy, poetry, or by what it is not. They also tend have many pages on describing the wonders of enlightenment and the horrors of rebirth into samsara, and few pages on actual practice. I find that Tracing Back The Radiance, with the particular Korean synthesis of Chinese Zen, does a better job of explaining the theory and practice of zazen than the other books in my library, and I wish that I had found it sooner.
Jeronashe
Having spent years practicing Korean Zen, this book is such a gift. It is a treasure trove of ideas about the practice of Son, but more than that, it is a powerful exposition of the perspective that Korean Son Buddhism takes on reality. A must read for Buddhist practitioners.
Arashigore
Though Chinul is accredited with being one of the, if not the most, influential philosophers of the Korean buddhist tradition, he is vastly under-read by scholars and Buddhist practicioners alike. Chinul provides penetrating insights into the relationship between language and enlightenment in a way that is both analytically rich while still possessing the mysterious poetics of Zen.

Chinul also provides a nescessary criticism of the misrepresentation of Zen that is seen so commonly in the West. Zen is not a form of anti-intellectualism as some might argue, rather it is a practice that emphasizes the need to break away from the addiction to conceptualization, not abandon it. Cognition and intellectual inquiry is not the problem; these in fact, as Chinul argues, are quite useful and nescessary tools for meditation. Chinul's writings bring our attention to two important aspects of Zen; the need for the restructuring of conceptualization as well as the need to realize the co-dependent relationship between the conceptual and the nonconceptual.

All in all, this is a book I highly recommend and I hope that many people will benefit from Chinul's insights.
Micelhorav
If you are looking for a fresh view on Zen, Chinul is the man to get it from. The book clearly explains his viewpoint.
MEGA FREEDY
Chinul, could very well be considered a Bodhisattva at least. Anyone interested in Korean Zen, or Zen as a whole, would do well to purchase this book.
ACOS
Wonderful book. Essential reading for Zen practitioners in the Korean tradition.