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eBook The Price of Motherhood: Why the Most Important Job in the World is Still the Least Valued download

by Ann Crittenden

eBook The Price of Motherhood: Why the Most Important Job in the World is Still the Least Valued download ISBN: 0805066187
Author: Ann Crittenden
Publisher: Metropolitan Books; 1st edition (February 15, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 448
ePub: 1457 kb
Fb2: 1652 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf docx lit lrf
Category: Relationships
Subcategory: Family Relationships

Ann Crittenden does an amazing job arguing for the rights of mothers (and women in general), backed with the kind of evidence you would find in scholarly journals. But in the second half of the book I felt profound disappointment. Ms. Crittenden seems to come to the conclusion that any form of motherhood is worthy of financial remuneration, it matters not if a mother's child is in round-the-clock day care. The myths of feminism's working woman are (inadvertently?) reinforced over the unrecognized contributions and sacrifices of career mothering.

Americans extol motherhood as "the most important job in the world," yet when couples divorce, mothers' and .

Americans extol motherhood as "the most important job in the world," yet when couples divorce, mothers' and their children's standards of living usually decline precipitously, while fathers' rise. Ann Crittenden does an amazing job arguing for the rights of mothers (and women in general), backed with the kind of evidence you would find in scholarly journals.

Ann Crittenden does an amazing job arguing for the rights of mothers (and women in general), backed with the kind of evidence you would find in scholarly journals.

The Price of Motherhood book. He was neglected as a newborn so much that his head was disfigured from lying in the crib and he hadn't spoken a word even though he was 3 years old. He was qualified to be sent to a home for retarded children when he was adopted by Virginia and Lewis Williams. These two parents gave him the love, education, moral integrity, and life lessons that most parents would.

The Price of Motherhood: Why the Most Important Job in the World is Still The Least Valued. NO AMERICAN woman in her right mind would want to become a mother. Having achieved a notional equality with men-at least if she is young, educated and working in a professional job-she will lose it again at a stroke. Instead, she faces a range of highly unattractive options

Motherhood : Why the Most Important Job in the World Is Still the Least Valued Ann Crittenden should be thanked for producing a book relevant to sociologists, women's studies scholars, and mother's.

The Price of Motherhood : Why the Most Important Job in the World Is Still the Least Valued. The sad truth is that most women in the throes of childrearing are so exhausted and dependent that they probably will never band together to become the political force that will create the pressure necessary to change this sad reality. Ann Crittenden should be thanked for producing a book relevant to sociologists, women's studies scholars, and mother's everywhere.

Ann Crittenden, The Price of Motherhood: Why the Most Important Job in the World is Still the Least Valued. Authors and affiliations.

New York: Metropolitan Books.

Ann Crittenden’s The Price of Motherhood, details the social devaluation of stay-at-home moms and the .

Ann Crittenden’s The Price of Motherhood, details the social devaluation of stay-at-home moms and the financial penalty paid by women who choose caring for children over working. Crittenden’s book is hailed as The Feminine Mystique for the motherhood movement, yet it owes more to Friedan’s 1980 follow-up, The Second Stage, in which she that argues equality is only one part of the feminist argument; the other is diversity among gender roles.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Price of Motherhood : Why the . In the pathbreaking tradition of Backlash and The Second Shift, Labor of Love opens the last frontier in the fight for women's equality: the economic penalties of motherhood.

In the pathbreaking tradition of Backlash and The Second Shift, Labor of Love opens the last frontier in the fight for women's equality: the economic penalties of motherhood. In this provocative book, award-winning economics journalist Ann Critten argues that although women have been liberated, mothers have not.

In the pathbreaking tradition of Backlash and The Second Shift, Labor of Love opens the last frontier in the fight for women's equality: the economic penalties of motherhood.In this provocative book, award-winning economics journalist Ann Critten argues that although women have been liberated, mothers have not. Drawing on hundreds of interviews around the country and the most current research in economics, history, child development, and law, she shows how mothers are systematically disadvantaged and made depent by a society that praises the labor of love but undervalues and even exploits those who perform it.The costs of motherhood are apparent everywhere. College-educated women pay a "mommy tax" of more than a million dollars in lost income when they have a child. Family law deprives mothers of financial equality in marriage. Most child care is excluded from the GDP, at-home mothers are not counted in the labor force, and the social safety net simply leaves them out. With passion and clarity, Critten dismantles the principal argument for the status quo: that it's a woman's "choice." She demonstrates, on the contrary, that proper recognition and reward for mothers' essential contributions would only enhance the welfare of all.Bold and galvanizing, full of innovative solutions, Labor of Love offers a much-needed accounting of the price mothers pay to carry out society's most important job.
Comments: (7)
Globus
I'd give this book 10 stars if I could. Ann Crittenden does an amazing job arguing for the rights of mothers (and women in general), backed with the kind of evidence you would find in scholarly journals.

More than convincing, and more than infuriating (though you won't want to stop), because with every page you realize that all the things you never really paid attention to or thought was fair (a wife getting less than half of her ex-husband's assets, etc.) are really just another subtle way our current system reinforces women's secondary place in society. I never really considered myself a feminist (even though I have taken numerous courses on sociology, anthro, and the like, and read up quite a bit on the subject) because I thought the idea was more or less outdated. We women have come a long way, have we not? I have certainly been convinced that I was wrong and short-sighted, and that there is another crucial step toward true equality, and other countries already have successful models of it in place (countries whose economies Americans envy - this is not a coincidence). I encourage everyone to read it. It will without a doubt open your eyes, and you will never see motherhood in the same light again.
Ventelone
I see that there are a number of folks who found this book not worthwhile at all. I'm sorry to see that so many of them are women. Crittenden, a former NEW YORK TIMES reporter and one-time Pulitzer Prize-nominee, knows whereof she speaks and writes. While the book is scholarly in tone and comes complete with copious footnotes, a vast bibliography, and so on, the passion in Crittenden's voice comes through loud and clear. Fact: Women who stay home with their kids are at a disadvantage financially and in terms of power. Fact: Women who stay home with their kids are punished (or simply not given the same breaks) by a tax system which apparently assents to the existence only of paid workers. Fact: This is a worldwide problem, with worldwide implications. I could go on and on about this book, but the best recommendation I can give you is to READ IT IMMEDIATELY. I have bought half a dozen copies of the book, in hard cover, because I felt so strongly about the value of what Crittenden has to say. Every woman I've given it to has thanked me and pronounced it fascinating, eye-opening and important reading. Even if you are not a woman--or not even a parent--you will learn a great deal from this extremely fine book on a neglected topic. Don't wait to read it yourself--get to it today!
Knights from Bernin
GREAT book for moms and working women alike!
Elizabeth
Great book. Read it for a class. Interesting!
Swift Summer
I have to admit, I had to buy this book for class, it was required. But I must admit, I enjoyed reading this book. This book was shipped on the exact date that it said it will arrive and it came with a lovely postcard with a note from the distributer. I loved this book and would highly recommend it to anyone interested.
happy light
This is one of the best books I've ever read. I wish more people (e.g. politicians) took its message seriously.
Vuzahn
As a stay at home mother of 5 the title of this book intrigued me. I was interested in learning the history of how motherhood came to be valued so little by modern America. And I hoped for affirmation of my life's hardest and most important work: mothering. The beginning of the book seemed to offer both. I could relate to the instant loss of success and credibility when, despite economic and social pressures, I left my professional career to stay home with my first baby. One of my husband's married male cousins actually asked me a chapter question, "So....exactly what DO you do all day at home?"
As I read through the first half of the book I became angry at maternal social injustices and was inspired by the baby-passion that encourages mothers to raise their own children anyway. But in the second half of the book I felt profound disappointment. Ms. Crittenden seems to come to the conclusion that any form of motherhood is worthy of financial remuneration, it matters not if a mother's child is in round-the-clock day care. The myths of feminism's working woman are (inadvertently?) reinforced over the unrecognized contributions and sacrifices of career mothering.
There are however seeds of a greater truth scattered within the pages of this book: a mother breastfeeding her baby, a mother caring for an aging family member, a mother who manages the household, volunteers her time, and homeschools her children should be acknowledged and valued (page 66). We know the price of motherhood, the rewards are less understood, and a deeper question remains. How can we, as a society, best support, protect and value motherhood?
"Labor is prior to, and independent of capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor, and could never have existed if labor had not first existed. Labor is the superior of capital, and deserves a much higher consideration." Abraham Lincoln
This book was filled with stories and statistics. I really appreciate and recommend this book.