carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Revising Business Prose

eBook Revising Business Prose download

by Richard A. Lanham

eBook Revising Business Prose download ISBN: 0684168618
Author: Richard A. Lanham
Publisher: Scribner; Highlighting and Underlining edition (June 1981)
Language: English
ePub: 1443 kb
Fb2: 1830 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: txt lit rtf lrf
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Writing Research and Publishing Guides

ADDENDUM: Richard Lanham's book also appears in a less expensive version Longman Guide to Revising Prose that reprints the 134-page main text. The excluded 30 pages comprise a brief glossary of grammatical terms and 35 exercises for the reader

ADDENDUM: Richard Lanham's book also appears in a less expensive version Longman Guide to Revising Prose that reprints the 134-page main text. The excluded 30 pages comprise a brief glossary of grammatical terms and 35 exercises for the reader.

For years, Professor Lanham has been after us about wordiness.

Ships from and sold by witsendbooks3. For years, Professor Lanham has been after us about wordiness. He calls it the Official Style; it's practiced whenever writers want to sound important, and to achieve this effect inflate what they write like Macy's Parade balloons. His "Paramedic Method" of rescuing hyper-inflated prose is directed in this slender volume to writers of business communications: memos, reports, policies, procedures, you name it.

Richard a. Lanham-Revising Prose-Macmillan (1992) - Free download as PDF File . df), Text File . xt) or read online for free. A teacher of business writing tells us not that "People entering business today must learn to speak effectively," but "One of these factors is the seemingly increasing awareness of the idea chat to succeed in business, it is imperative that the yo ung person entering a business career possess definite skill in oral communication.

ADDENDUM: Richard Lanham's book also appears in a less expensive version Longman Guide to Revising Prose that reprints the 134-page main text.

See a Problem? We’d love your help. Lanham (born 1936) is probably most widely known for his textbooks on revising prose to improve style and clarify thought. He is also a notable scholar of the history of rhetoric who has published notable books on the subject

Richard A. He is also a notable scholar of the history of rhetoric who has published notable books on the subject. Lanham was educated at Sidwell Friends School and Yale University (. He is Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Los Angeles, and president of Rhetorica, In. a consulting firm

by Richard A. Lanham. Two things taught me to write: this book and reading a lot of CS Lewis. Both will give you a lesson in the key to good communication - verbs.

by Richard A. Most technical reports use a form of "to be" as the verb in almost every sentence.

Lanham is the author of numerous books on writing, including Style: An Anti-textbook, The Motives of Eloquence: Literary Rhetoric in the Renaissance, Revising Prose, Revising Business Prose, Analyzing Prose, and Literacy and the Survival of Humanism. Richard Lanham married Carol Dana in 1957. Библиографические данные. Revising Prose Scribner English Series.

Book by Lanham, Richard A.
Comments: (7)
Whitescar
Just a good book, good information and a good ref to have around if you are a writer in business or technical fields.
iSlate
Revising Business Prose was recommended to me by a co-worker. When not presenting examples of concise writing, Richard Lanham writes with a slow, stilted style, antithetic to his own recommendations. While instructing readers not to overwrite, he overwrites.

I won't even talk about the chapter, "Who's Kicking Who?" O! Wait a moment. I just did. He defends his misuse of the subject, "who," in place of the object, "whom," by claiming "whom" sounds stilted. So, it is OK for him to employ idiomatic language and yet write a book criticizing the same. At almost $0.35 per page ($40 MSRP/117 pages), I don't see the value.
Gio
Two things taught me to write: this book and reading a lot of CS Lewis. Both will give you a lesson in the key to good communication -- verbs. Most technical reports use a form of "to be" as the verb in almost every sentence.

Stop it!
Thabel
it is brand new and i enjoy reading the book. like other paper bag book, the page will fall off if u fold it too hard.
Uris
For years, Professor Lanham has been after us about wordiness. He calls it the Official Style; it's practiced whenever writers want to sound important, and to achieve this effect inflate what they write like Macy's Parade balloons. His "Paramedic Method" of rescuing hyper-inflated prose is directed in this slender volume to writers of business communications: memos, reports, policies, procedures, you name it. By following his advice step by step, it's possible to achieve directness, clarity, even simplicity by finding the plain English that neatly expresses what we want to say. And that means finding and disposing of all the unnecessary verbiage, which by Lanham's estimate comprises about 50% of what we write.
Take the following cumbersome sentence, the likes of which routinely typify everyday business communications: "On the basis of the answers to these and other questions which the team might ask, I would expect the team to present us with detailed recomendations for enhancing the effectiveness of our reporting." Lanham shows how to transform it into something elegantly precise: "By answering questions like these, the team should be able to recommend improvements in our reporting." A reduction, he would be quick to point out, from 34 words to 16 words. True, as the saying goes, it takes longer to write something shorter, but the finished product is more likely to be read, understood, and acted upon by its intended audience.
Lanham's approach to all this is hardly stuffy. He has a good time poking fun at egregious examples of ponderous prose, and he also has a good time whacking it into something presentable. And the end result isn't just readable; it's alive, full of energy, and packs a wallop. This book is for every business person who has something important to say and wants to be sure that what they've written gets read rather than shoved to the side because it's a chore to plow through. Buy this book, read it, and reread it. You won't be sorry.
Urllet
I was given an earlier edition of this book by a colleague in the English department. I laughed when I thought this little David was going to tackle the Goliath of Business prose, but darned if he didn't come through like a crackshot. Lanham effectively teaches writers who hide their ideas in complicated and wordy prose how to cut through the fog and reveal their ideas. Sometimes--and no offense to university teachers (heck I'm one of them) students get it into their heads that convolution leads to respect--and that may be for those writing books on theory--but most of the time convoluted prose just leads the reader to a lot of head-scratching. If you are writing, you need to be clear. This is especially true if you are writing for business. Lanham helps you dissipate cloudy phrasings, and pull ideas out into the light of day. I had to give my copy back to my colleague, but I'm ordering my own now. (I also shudder to think how my prose in this paragraph would stand up to scrutiny--which is why I'm buying and memorizing the book.) I recommend this for English teachers and those writing for businesses--after all there are lots of assessments, idea-pitching and grant writing that need clarity. Lanham comes through like a hero.
Vikus
This great little book is an island of hope in a world flooded with pompous, pretentious messages. If you practice what Dr. Lanham preaches you will write leaner and tighter texts. You will use his smart paramedic method to get rid of unwanted lard. Just one wish for future editions: Please include some practical exercises. This will help less experienced readers not only gain but retain better writing skills.
If you are looking to revise business prose this book is really good with explaining the process step by step. It is in plain english, no big words you will need to look up.It is also fun to read.