carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Discourse Analysis in the Language Classroom: Volume 2. Genres of Writing (Vol 2)

eBook Discourse Analysis in the Language Classroom: Volume 2. Genres of Writing (Vol 2) download

by Ann Kristin Wennerstrom

eBook Discourse Analysis in the Language Classroom: Volume 2. Genres of Writing (Vol 2) download ISBN: 0472089196
Author: Ann Kristin Wennerstrom
Publisher: University of Michigan Press ELT (July 30, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 200
ePub: 1499 kb
Fb2: 1293 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: azw lrf txt lit
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Writing Research and Publishing Guides

It gives step-by-step instructions for how to design a discourse-based curriculum, how to adapt existing materials, and how to create new activities.

It gives step-by-step instructions for how to design a discourse-based curriculum, how to adapt existing materials, and how to create new activities.

By investigating genres of writing as they occur in authentic social contexts, learners can become more versatile and independent, applying genre knowledge to their own writing needs. It gives step-by-step instructions for how to design a discourse-based curriculum, how to adapt existing materials, and how to create new activities. Format Paperback 200 pages.

Vol. 2: Genres of writing. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Written discourse analysis and L2 teaching. Ferris, D. R. (2011). Topics such as affirmative action, racial and ethnic discrimination, the controversy surrounding bilingual education, et. have, therefore, been in ascendancy. Inherent in such topics is an emotional locus. However, to date, there exists no empirical.

Part 2 provides practical guidance for the implementation of this analytical approach with two general categories of writing. Chapter 4 deals with Writing in Everyday Life, and Chapter 5 treats Academic Writing

Challenges in the Application of Genre Theory to Improve L2 Academic Writing: Effective Reports and Assessment. María Martínez Lirola, Derek Irwin.

Challenges in the Application of Genre Theory to Improve L2 Academic Writing: Effective Reports and Assessment.

Wennerstrom, A. and Siegel, A. (2003) ‘Keeping the floor in multiparty conversations: intonation, syntax, and pause’, Discourse Processes, 36, 2: 77–107. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Wichmann, A. (2000) Intonation in Text and Discourse: Beginnings, Middles and Ends (Harlow: Longman).

The discourse analysis approach presented in this volume is intended for high-intermediate to advanced students.

Classroom Discourse, Vol. 1, Issue. Lee D. 2001 Genres, registers, text types, domains, and styles: Clarifying the concepts and navigating a path through the BNC jungle. Robinson P. 2001 Task complexity, task difficulty, and task production: Exploring interactions in a componential framework.

This book presents an approach to the teaching of second language writing in which students themselves work as discourse analysts. By investigating genres of writing as they occur in authentic social contexts, learners can become more versatile and independent, applying genre knowledge to their own writing needs. Like its partner book (Volume 1. The Spoken Language), Discourse Analysis in the Language Classroom is highly practical. It gives step-by-step instructions for how to design a discourse-based curriculum, how to adapt existing materials, and how to create new activities. It can also be used to stimulate further research and discussion: it explains the rationale behind a discourse-analysis approach and the foundations of genre theory, including discussion questions for each topic and an annotated bibliography of related work. .