carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Blood River: The Terrifying Journey Through The World's Most Dangerous Country

eBook Blood River: The Terrifying Journey Through The World's Most Dangerous Country download

by Tim Butcher

eBook Blood River: The Terrifying Journey Through The World's Most Dangerous Country download ISBN: 0802144330
Author: Tim Butcher
Publisher: Grove Press; First Trade Paper edition (September 1, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 384
ePub: 1135 kb
Fb2: 1811 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi lrf mobi docx
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Writing Research and Publishing Guides

Tim Butcher deserves a medal for this crazy feat.

Tim Butcher deserves a medal for this crazy feat. I marvel at his courage and his empathy with the unfortunate Congolese when he re-enacted Stanley’s appalling journey across the continent. Thomas Pakenham, author of The Scramble for Africa. This is a terrific book, an adventure story about a journey of great bravery in one of the world’s most dangerous places. It keeps the heart beating and the attention fixed from beginning to end. -Fergal Keane, author of Season of Blood: A Rwandan Journey.

Blood River: A Journey to Africa's Broken Heart (also published as Blood River: The Terrifying Journey Through the World's Most Dangerous Country) is a 2007 book by British journalist and writer Tim Butcher

Blood River: A Journey to Africa's Broken Heart (also published as Blood River: The Terrifying Journey Through the World's Most Dangerous Country) is a 2007 book by British journalist and writer Tim Butcher. Blood River was written after Butcher was posted as an Africa foreign correspondent for British newspaper the Daily Telegraph.

Mr. Butcher gives us many moving impressions of life in this part of the world – and it is for the most part not very pretty. He meets a wide array of characters, most of who have been deeply affected by the violence and poverty in the Congo. There are many enduring images from this book. The four Africans who took him by pirogue (a type of canoe) up a part of the Congo left a very forlorn This is a very engaging, but at the same time, disturbing story of this man’s journey on the Congo River.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Blood River : The Terrifying Journey Through . It even left me with more of an affection for Stanley than I have ever felt before. As for Butcher, I have nothing but admiration for hi.

It even left me with more of an affection for Stanley than I have ever felt before.

Originally published: London: Chatto & Windus, 2007, under title : Blood river : a journey to Africa's broken heart. Includes bibliographical references (p. 347-348) and index. aid workers to a pygmy-rights advocate.

When Daily Telegraph correspondent Tim Butcher was sent to Africa in 2000 he quickly became obsessed with the . An utterly absorbing narrative that chronicles Butcher’s forty-four-day journey along the Congo River, Blood River is an unforgettable story of exploration and survival.

When Daily Telegraph correspondent Tim Butcher was sent to Africa in 2000 he quickly became obsessed with the legendary Congo River and the idea of recreating Stanley’s journey along the three-thousand-mile waterway.

Blood River - a journey today but going beyond the past. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 9 years ago. Tim Butcher was Africa correspondent for the UK's Daily Telegraph when he decided to follow Stanley's route of 1874-77 down the Congo from central Africa to the Atlantic. Butcher's story is both riveting and depressing. Riveting as he writes well of his travels and is able to punctuate his story with relevant historical outlines of a regions past and with well chosen and revealing interviews (he is a journalist after all) with local individuals.

Blood River was written after Butcher was posted as an Africa foreign correspondent for the British newspaper the Daily Telegraph.

Blood River: A Journey to Africa's Broken Heart (also published as Blood River: The Terrifying Journey Through the World's Most Dangerous Country) is a 2007 book by British journalist and writer Tim Butcher. Tim Butcher FRSGS is an English author, broadcaster, and journalist. Blood River was written after Butcher was posted as an Africa foreign correspondent for the British newspaper the Daily Telegraph. The book not only tells the story of Butcher's journey but the remarkable story of the Congo.

When Daily Telegraph correspondent Tim Butcher was sent to Africa in 2000,.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. When Daily Telegraph correspondent Tim Butcher was sent to Africa in 2000,. he quickly became obsessed with the Congo River and the idea of recreating H. M. Stanley’s nineteenth-century journey along the nearly three-thousand-mile waterway.

Published by Grove Press, 2009. Bibliographic Details. Title: Blood River: The Terrifying Journey Through. Publisher: Grove Press. Publication Date: 2009. Condition: Good Soft cover. From Books Express (Portsmouth, NH, .

Published to rave reviews in the United Kingdom and named a Richard & Judy Book Club selection—the only work of nonfiction on the 2008 list—Blood River is the harrowing and audacious story of Tim Butcher’s journey in the Congo and his retracing of legendary explorer H. M. Stanley’s famous 1874 expedition in which he mapped the Congo River. When Daily Telegraph correspondent Tim Butcher was sent to Africa in 2000 he quickly became obsessed with the legendary Congo River and the idea of recreating Stanley’s journey along the three-thousand-mile waterway. Despite warnings that his plan was suicidal, Butcher set out for the Congo’s eastern border with just a backpack and a few thousand dollars hidden in his boots. Making his way in an assortment of vehicles, including a motorbike and a dugout canoe, helped along by a cast of characters from UN aid workers to a pygmy rights advocate, he followed in the footsteps of the great Victorian adventurer. An utterly absorbing narrative that chronicles Butcher’s forty-four-day journey along the Congo River, Blood River is an unforgettable story of exploration and survival.
Comments: (7)
Punind
Without the publication of this fascinating account of one man's arduous journey across a continent and through a forgotten country, the world would be worse off. The author weaves together historical accounts of the few who preceded him: Henry Stanley ("Dr. Livingstone, I presume."), Robert Conrad (Heart of Darkness), Evelyn Waugh, Graham Greene, and Barbara Kingsolver (The Poisonwood Bible). This makes the book much more than just a travel report but also a bibliography as wide and as deep as the mighty Congo River.
Cesar
This was a gripping story of a dangerous journey through almost unbelievably primitive conditions. Much of what he related about his encounters was almost unbelievable to read about in the 21st C. I've traveled to third world and developing world, and have seen the incongruity of people on oxcarts with cell-phones etc. as they progress unevenly--but progress they do! But there is none of that on his journey. No sign of the 21st C, and almost none of the 20th C remaining in the area he traveled through. It broke my heart to realize how the world has ignored and forgotten the suffering DRC people. Mr. Butcher is a very interesting writer, and I appreciated the regional history as well as the story of his own tribulations and perseverance (although at times I thought he was just plain crazy to continue!). I would have given this book a "5 star" but the end of the book just petered out, so the end was a bit of a disappointment. Nonetheless, highly recommended!
Ramsey`s
I just finished reading both this and Jeffrey Tayler's Facing the Congo: A Modern-Day Journey into the Heart of Darkness, which describes a similar journey. The two books are quite different in their approaches to the material, but they lend themselves to comparison, and on the whole, this book, Blood River, comes out ahead.

The premise of this work is simple. The author, at the time the Africa corespondent for the Daily Telegraph, decides to retrace the journey of the most famous Daily Telegraph correspondent of a previous era: Henry Morton Stanley. He prepares for this trip for years, reading extensively about Stanley, the Congo, and Africa in general before starting his remarkable trip. After first flying to the shores of Lake Tanganyika, he the follows, using mostly modern conveyances, the route pioneered over a century before by Stanley. Throughout he compares his experiences with those of the prior explorer, and with the experiences of only a few decades ago, at the time of the Belgian colony. I was amazed to learn how developed the Congo had been prior to its independence. A modern joke, which does not feature in this book, but which applies completely goes as follows: a child asks his grandparent "what did you use for light before candles were invented?" and the grandparent replies "Electricity." The constant refrain of this book is the elderly, 70+ year old crowd, who remember clean water, good roads, good hospitals, the rule of law, and electric light, while their grandchildren work as subsistence farmers or mercenaries.

Butcher writes as a journalist, and it shows. His ability to bring even a savage and dangerous "undeveloping" country to vivid, engrossing light is superb. His research before the trip shows as well, in his asides about flora, fauna, and the monuments he discovers. His point in making the trip was a deeper understanding of the country, and this is where the starkest contrast is seen between his work and Tayler's. Tayler states at the opening of his book that the journey was one of self discovery, and that book is much more inward focused and solipsistic. It is surprising then, that I feel the reader gets a better picture of Butcher than of Tayler, as we see his interest in, and concern for, the people he encounters. His closing paragraphs add a note of hope to an otherwise bleak look at the "broken heart of Africa". Which is a wonderfully coined phrase, by the way.

The book is written in British English, with an occasional word I had to look up as an American reader. (I had never heard the term "tatty" before reading this). Occasionally he repeats himself, with some key phrases repeated more than once. Butcher describes Mobutu's "singlehanded" prevention of Congo's success on at least three occasions, using very similar wording. But these are relatively minor quibbles with an otherwise excellent work.

Highly recommended.
MARK BEN FORD
Another Western journalist's account of his travels through a war-torn African country, this time, the Congo. For anyone who read and enjoyed King Leopold's Ghost, this book can almost serve as a sort of sequel. In it, Tim Butcher attempts to retrace Henry Morton Stanley's portentous journey through the Congo over a century before. A friend of the author ironically points out, it's probably more dangerous to trek across the Congolese bush now than it was in Stanley's day.

So, I admit the book's premise may be a little bit gimmicky, but Tim Butcher's voice more than makes up for it. He's a great writer and a genuinely likable person. (For those of you who have watched the show Survivor Man, imagine a Les Stroud who reads.) I found him to be sincere and direct - equal parts compassionate and honest. And despite his incredible hubris in undertaking this mission, he's surprisingly gentle-spirited and not at all pretentious.

And just when I would begin to categorize him as a sort of straight-forward, no-frills writer, he would sideswipe me with a beautifully written description of something or someone he found compelling in the Congo, like a rusted piece of Belgian railroad track overtaken by the bush, or the frenetic Congolese priest lamenting the absence of law and order, or the man who was willing to give his four-year-old child to a complete stranger to save him from the Congo. I definitely enjoyed this book enough to pick up his next one right away.