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eBook Theatre of Fish: Travels Through Newfoundland and Labrador download

by John Gimlette

eBook Theatre of Fish: Travels Through Newfoundland and Labrador download ISBN: 0091795192
Author: John Gimlette
Publisher: Knopf; First Edition edition (2005)
Language: English
Pages: 368
ePub: 1652 kb
Fb2: 1853 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf mobi docx doc
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Writing Research and Publishing Guides

Theatre of Fish book.

Theatre of Fish book. He takes you through St. John's, outports and Labrador with humor, warmth and sensitivity to this newest of Canadian provinces, once its own island nation of the British Empire. When I return to Newfoundland I'll be taking this book with all of its tagged pages with me. Thank you, John, for sharing your heartfelt A must read for anyone venturing to Newfoundland. John Gimlette takes you with him on his journey to discover more about the life and adventures of his great-grandfather, Eliot Curwen.

John Gimlette's journey across this harsh and awesome landscape, the eastern extreme of the Americas, broadly . Head further north and you’re in Labrador, back on the mainland but among a population of just 30 thousand (for 3,000 square miles per inhabitant).

John Gimlette's journey across this harsh and awesome landscape, the eastern extreme of the Americas, broadly mirrors that of Dr Eliot Curwen, his great-grandfather, who spent a summer there as a doctor in 1893, and who was witness to some of the most beautiful ice and cruelest poverty in the British Empire.

In John Gimlette's frothy treatment, the island is absolutely teeming with impossibly colorful characters spouting .

In John Gimlette's frothy treatment, the island is absolutely teeming with impossibly colorful characters spouting nonstop entertainment. Everybody had a speech or a song or a little act," he writes. Dramas simply tumbled out of people, complete with prologues, heckling, applause and curtain calls.

Theatre of Fish: Travels Throufh New Zealand and Labrador. Published by Thriftbooks. This book is my first experience with Mr. Gimlette's travel writing, and rarely have I read something that moved me so much. com User, 13 years ago. Author John Gimlette calls Newfoundland a "far-flung place. It's a place that has always fascinated him. And with good reason. I've been to Newfoundland three times, but never ventured beyond the St. John's city limits.

John Gimlette is an English author of travel literature. He has published five books to date; Panther Soup: A European Journey in War and Peace, Theatre Of Fish: Travels through Newfoundland and Labrador, At The Tomb Of The Inflatable Pig: Travels through Paraguay Wild Coast: Travels on South America's Untamed Edge and Elephant Complex. Born in 1963, at the age of 17 Gimlette crossed the former Soviet Union by train, and has now travelled to more than 60 countries.

John Gimlette is a passionate, endlessly curious guide through Newfoundland and Labrador, two strange . That led me to "Theatre of Fish", Gimlette's travelogue/history of Newfoundland and Labrador, once an independent nation but now part of Canada

John Gimlette is a passionate, endlessly curious guide through Newfoundland and Labrador, two strange places that remain strange to me, bu. .now, thanks to Gimlette, there's specificity and texture and history with the strange. If you're hesitant to read what is called "travel writing", start here, and you'll realize what is possible. That led me to "Theatre of Fish", Gimlette's travelogue/history of Newfoundland and Labrador, once an independent nation but now part of Canada

John Gimlette's journey across this harsh and awesome landscape, the eastern extreme of the Americas, broadly mirrors that of Dr Eliot Curwen, his great-grandfather, who spent a summer there as a doctor in 1893, and who was witness to some of the most beautiful ice and cruelest.

Louisa Waugh finds unpleasant excess baggage in John Gimlette's trip to Newfoundland and Labrador, Theatre of Fish

Louisa Waugh finds unpleasant excess baggage in John Gimlette's trip to Newfoundland and Labrador, Theatre of Fish. Gimlette essentially follows in the footsteps of his great grandfather, Dr Eliot Curwen, who lived and worked in this far-flung eastern corner of Canada during the summer of 1893. Travel books written by men (it always seems to be men) who traipse around after their dead male ancestors puzzle me. Frankly I can't really see the point unless the deceased was either thrillingly notorious or died in spectacular fashion. Eliot Curwen was a discreet man and a careful traveller, who died quietly at home in Sussex, England at the age of 84.

Travels Through Newfoundland and Labrador. About Theatre of Fish. Part of Vintage Departures. Newfoundland is one of the most intriguing places in North America, a land of breathtaking but cruel beauty, populated by some of the saltiest, oddest characters you’ll ever find. In Theatre of Fish, John Gimlette vividly describes the dense forests and forbidding coastlines and recounts the colorful and often tragic history of the region. He introduces us to the inhabitants, from the birds and moose to the descendants of the outlaws, deserters, and fishermen who settled this eastern edge of North America.

The author travels around the communities of Newfoundland and Labrador to vividly portray the character of place and inhabitants.

J. Gimlette, Theatre of Fish: Travels Through Newfoundland and Labrador, (London: Hutchinson, 2005), vii-xiv + 365pp. It aims to portray a personality of Newfoundland and its inhabitants through the eyes of a writer with close family connections spread over more than 100 years or so in the history of the 'Rock', as Newfoundland is parochially known. The author travels around the communities of Newfoundland and Labrador to vividly portray the character of place and inhabitants.

Comments: (7)
Modimeena
Part gonzo travelogue, part anthropology, part history of an resource apocalypse, "Theatre of Fish" manages to range from profound to hilarious - with occasional detours into the barely comprehensible. For combating the latter it pays to bookmark the glossary of regional expressions - plus have the internet ready for Inuit and technical terms.

The author is above all things a great listener, piecing together family histories and kinship which as it happens link to his own. The tales are mostly tragic, of the centuries long gold rush that was the cod fishery characterized by a level of lawlessness and hardship that makes our wild west sound tame. For one thing, these desperadoes are still at it.

Ostensibly retracing the journals of his great grandfather who served as a doctor in the area, the author fleshes things out by interviewing the descendants of patients. While good conversation, the more dramatic the better, seems the primary criteria for mention in the book, the general population seems remarkably well endowed in this regard. It seems all Newfoundland is a stage, peopled with characters apologetically, blatantly, charmingly, horrifyingly human. The dialects are archaic, the cursing world class, the life choices and behavior frequently bad - but as they’re also hospitable, a fine adventure is had.

Conversations with old timers read like the opening of a time capsule, recalling bare livings earned from a depleting fishery, killing whales, clubbing seals, and frequently getting killed in turn from storms and ice - bodies turning up in fishing gear and taking the return trip salted among the fish, or stacked on deck in the attitudes in which they froze.

As with the best history, it also provides a view forward. After all, it is the story of a seemingly endless natural resource, one that endured for half a millennium in the face of ever more sophisticated harvesting by fleets from around the world - then suddenly collapsed. It’s a story ancient, contemporary and yet to be - all at the same time.

The account comes in two parts, the twisted tale of Newfoundland's European visitors (the vast majority enduring virtually as slaves), and the even more desolate Labrador where the native people are still reeling from contact. To find Newfoundland on the map head northeast from Maine, passing Nova Scotia, then crossing a hundred miles of water. The island of Newfoundland is the size of Italy, with half million inhabitants clinging to the coast, water being nearly the only means of travel. Which is not to entirely dismiss Route 1 - numbered as in only - a road built in the ‘90’s. Head further north and you’re in Labrador, back on the mainland but among a population of just 30 thousand (for 3,000 square miles per inhabitant). It also enjoys ferry service when the Atlantic isn’t frozen and is traversed by a road.

Any romantic notions you may have of the frozen north will unlikely survive the actual horror and savagery related here. As it happens the locals are quite vocal about not being quaint. Your moralist too may be shaken in his beliefs as he encounters the local take on niceties. Even simply bearing witness as the author does - and not being the sort to search for answers as he says - he finds questions and contradictions piling up.

Consider the natives of Labrador. You take a people sublimely adapted to surviving in a sort of watery version of outer space, and relocate them for their own good into subdivisions with satellite TV, snowmobiles and convenience food. Stripped of ten thousand years of life experience hunting seals and caribou they find themselves with zilch: no identity, belief system, or occupation, utterly adrift in an alien (read our) world. No wonder they respond like captive animals, trashing their government issue housing, hating outsiders, the dole and themselves - and exhibiting periodic bouts of suicide and murder. To illustrate, supply ship crews have learned to drop their loads on the docks at dawn and depart to avoid rock throwing children.

It’s the South Bronx north - and 1200 miles east - where polar bears and wolves roam the streets at night. What’s to be done when every solution tried has been ineffective at best, and frequently genocidal? So grows the pile of traits admirable and despicable, ways of life that "no longer work," yet remain precious. It seems that by embracing this very human talent for contradiction that Gimlette portrays so capably that we might learn how to respond.
Qag
Some interesting historical references, but I don't agree with much else. Have traveled to Newfoundland a number of times, and I feel he did not capture the real Newfoundland, its friendly, welcoming people. Very dark, wouldn't recommend to someone planning a trip there.
Boraston
This is tongue in cheek at times, and while I can't quite agree with all that is said, my memories proceed this authors life, and living there is slightly different from hearing the stories a half a generation or generation later. Well written it does capture the fierce independence of the place and the anger around the collapse of the cod industry, which was not caused by the dorymen for sure, or the Portuguese schooners that provisioned in St. John's harbour and set sail without auxilluary engines to spend a season at sea filling their ships with cod. It was the factory ships that came later with their nets and drag lines scooping up more tonnage than nature could replace.
Good read.
Hugifyn
Dark, and with an eye for (and disdain for) irony. If you're learning about NL, this is a good book to read, but not the only book.
Anayajurus
A wonderful book of travels in Newfoundland and Labrador, with serious historical research, looking into social developments and politics, rich in anecdotes and quotations of ancient travelers, beautifully written with enthusiasm and sincerity. And a great sense of humour. Currently reading Gimlette's book on the Guyanas, excellent too. I never had any contact with him or his publishers.
Kirizan
surreal
Vut
My husband visited Newfoundland years ago. He thoroughly enjoyed this take on its history.
I enjoyed this book very much; great read especially if you are going to be visiting Newfoundland, but even if you aren't.