carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » The Japanese Chronicles

eBook The Japanese Chronicles download

by Nicolas Bouvier

eBook The Japanese Chronicles download ISBN: 1562790463
Author: Nicolas Bouvier
Publisher: Mercury House (September 1, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1738 kb
Fb2: 1622 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: txt lrf docx lit
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Writing Research and Publishing Guides

Nicholas Bouvier was an exquisite traveller and the greatest Swiss travel writer of the 20th century. Without waiting for the result of his degree, in 1953 he left for Yoguslavia with no intention of returning

Nicholas Bouvier was an exquisite traveller and the greatest Swiss travel writer of the 20th century. Without waiting for the result of his degree, in 1953 he left for Yoguslavia with no intention of returning. The fruits of this journey of a year and a half, were published some eight years later, as The Way of the World. Bouvier continued, through India to Ceylon and thence to Japan.

The Japanese Chronicles book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Japanese Chronicles.

It was published in English in 1992 as The Japanese Chronicles. In this book, he blended his personal experiences of Japan with Japanese history and rewrote a Japanese history from a Western perspectives

It was published in English in 1992 as The Japanese Chronicles. In this book, he blended his personal experiences of Japan with Japanese history and rewrote a Japanese history from a Western perspectives. Japan," he says, "is a lesson in economy. It is not considered good form to take up too much space.

The Japanese chronicles. Japan - Description and travel.

Nicolas Bouvier was an image merchant and photographer as well as a writer.

In the Fifties, Bouvier set up home in an oddly rustic suburb of Tokyo where the only English-based words were "kissu .

In the Fifties, Bouvier set up home in an oddly rustic suburb of Tokyo where the only English-based words were "kissu (from 'kiss') and stenko (from 'stinky')". Bouvier describes a cluttered world, where poverty was common but begging unknown and cleanliness scrupulously observed. Bathing was particularly important for foreigners who "have the reputation of being easily tracked by their odour". Nicholas Bouvier was an exquisite traveller and the greatest Swiss travel writer of the 20th century

Nicolas Bouvier was an image merchant and photographer as well as a writer. This book is accompanied by several of his images of Japan. It is a distillation of his lifelong quest for Japan and his travels. Nicholas Bouvier was an exquisite traveller and the greatest Swiss travel writer of the 20th century.

The & travel books,'' Bouvier believes, &.Merchants' strict observations avoid the silly infatuations that will quickly take over the literature once poets start to travel. Happily, in this sensitive, acutely observed record of his stays in Japan, the author, a journalist who lives in Switzerland, disproves that statement with some of the most resonant and perceptive travel writing in recent years .

This study compared the magnitude of ethnic identification among three generations of Japanese-Americans in Honolulu, Hawaii. Ethnic identification was measured by a recently constructed Ethnic Identity Questionnaire

This study compared the magnitude of ethnic identification among three generations of Japanese-Americans in Honolulu, Hawaii. Ethnic identification was measured by a recently constructed Ethnic Identity Questionnaire. The first generation Japanese immigrant (Issei) scored higher than the second (Nisei) and third (Sansei) generations. The EIQ scores between the Nisei and Sansei, although not. This was attributed to intermingling of peer self-defined generation groups.

The Japanese Chronicles is a travel narrative by Swiss writer Nicolas Bouvier (1929–1998), who .

The Japanese Chronicles is a travel narrative by Swiss writer Nicolas Bouvier (1929–1998), who uses a narrative strategy blending the historical and the personal. Bouvier’s style favours the exploration of the ‘Other’ through the anecdote of the encounter. The (hi)story of the encounter constitutes the framework of The Japanese Chronicles, a book organized in significant historical episodes.

Based on three decades of travel throughout Japan, collects the author's recollections and views on life in the Land of the Rising Sun
Comments: (4)
RuTGamer
Well written, interesting book on the history of Japan written from a different perspective.
Jogas
Excellent writer, however sometimes specially at the end of the book he sort of loose focus and ramble a little bit. He explored Japan at a time when Japan was affordable, mid-fifties, and sixties and the Japanese people in general were less cosmopolitan, so there is great charm in that, as for today I am sure some of that charm is lost, of course this is not a travel guide, but reminiscences of his stays there, and his impressions as an educated Swiss-French writer.
Shadowbourne
This is definitely not a book for those who know little of Japan and/or are planning to visit that country soon for the first time. It covers the author's life and travels in the 1950s and 60s, a Japan that was still post-war and pre-economic miracle, a world light-years away from the Japan of the 21st century. Then the book is quite somber in tone; it doesn't make you want to go see Japan at all. There is a section on history but nothing on culture or the arts. Finally, much space is dedicated to the northern island of Hokkaido, a place with almost no culture or history, and so should not be in an introduction to Japan.

On the other hand, for those who know Japan well, there are some gold nuggets to found here. The book is a collection of notes that the author wrote here and there. So as an historical document, illuminating the country's recent past, it is valuable and interesting. I found, for example, the parts on Tokyo and Kyoto worth while.

Large parts I found to be of limited interest because these chronicles are more about the author than about Japan.

The writing is good, in general, and the translation well above average.
Windforge
I read this book one month into a year-stay in Japan. The country which was becoming increasingly unattractive to me became fascinating again. I love this book. Like Alan Booth, the author presents Japan and its people in a unsentimental, yet loving way. Highly recommended.