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by Willis Goth Regier

eBook Quotology (Stages) download ISBN: 0803217528
Author: Willis Goth Regier
Publisher: Bison Books (October 1, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1178 kb
Fb2: 1402 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mobi txt lit doc
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Writing Research and Publishing Guides

Willis Goth Regier is the director of the University of Illinois Press.

Willis Goth Regier is the director of the University of Illinois Press. I feel as if this must be the ending to a prayer belonging to dedicated quotation collectors everywhere, and that I should quote it aloud followed by a hearty "Amen!"

In Quotology Willis Goth Regier draws on world literature and contemporary events to show how vital quotations are . THE SENSE OF STYLE by Steven Pinker - A short and entertaining book on the modern art of writing well by New York Times bestselling author Steven Pinker.

In Quotology Willis Goth Regier draws on world literature and contemporary events to show how vital quotations are, how they are collected and organized, and how deceptive they can be. World Literature Quotation Marks October 1 Paper Book Bibliophile Storytelling Writing Paper Articles Author. Good writing can flip the way the world is perceived, like the silhouette in psychology textbooks which oscillates between a goblet and two faces.

Erasmus advised readers to learn quotations by heart and copy them everywhere: write them in the front and back of books; inscribe them on rings and cups; paint them on doors and walls, "even on the glass of a window. Emerson noted that "in Europe, every church is a kind of book or bible, so covered is it with inscriptions and pictures. In Arabic script as tall as a man, the Koran is quoted on the walls and domes of mosques. We quote to admire, provoke, commemorate, dispute, play, and inspire. Quotations signal class, club, clique, and alma mater

In Quotology Willis Goth Regier draws on world literature and contemporary events to show how vital quotations are, how they are collected and organized, and how deceptive they can be. He probes all these aspects, identifying fifty-nine types of quotations, including misquotations an. . He probes all these aspects, identifying fifty-nine types of quotations, including misquotations and anonymous sayings. Following the logic of quotology, Quotology concludes with famous last words. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles. Publisher: University.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. 9 Mb. In praise of flattery. 0 Mb. Category: Politics Sociology. A trove of ical gems. -Publishers Weekly Publishers Weekly "he book contains many gems: exquisite, entertaining, carefully chosen words by the obscure.

Erasmus advised readers to learn quotations by heart and copy them everywhere: write them in the front and back of books; inscribe them on rings and cups; paint them on doors and walls, “even on the glass of a window.” Emerson noted that “in Europe, every church is a kind of book or bible, so covered is it with inscriptions and pictures.” In Arabic script as tall as a man, the Koran is quoted on the walls and domes of mosques. We quote to admire, provoke, commemorate, dispute, play, and inspire. Quotations signal class, club, clique, and alma mater. They animate wit, relay prophecies, guide meditation, and accessorize fashion. In Quotology Willis Goth Regier draws on world literature and contemporary events to show how vital quotations are, how they are collected and organized, and how deceptive they can be. He probes all these aspects, identifying fifty-nine types of quotations, including misquotations and anonymous sayings. Following the logic of quotology, Quotology concludes with famous last words.
Comments: (2)
SoSok
Academics beware: The content of this book is phenomenal; however, the structure is largely non-existent and its presentation is little more than incessant babble. Most of the prose is in the form of "this person said this, that person said that" sentences that are loosely strung into largely incoherent and purposeless paragraphs. The lack of structure and terrible presentation of this book renders it almost worthless for skimming and referencing: you are forced to plow through this book from start to finish in hopes of finding the information you're looking for. The only saving grace of this book is that key terms and phrases are found in either section headings or in all-capitalization; however, these terms and phrases often go undefined, thereby voiding any value they could have had. Personally, the most value I gained from the book came after highlighting all key terms and phrases, thereby making the book into a taxonomy of quotology. A "taxonomy of quotology" is (roughly) what I expected the book to be in the first place! Alas, it isn't.
Gietadia
When I was thirteen I inadvertently got hooked on quotations without even knowing that's what my obsession was, while reading The Scarlet Letter for a homework assignment and scribbling down the best lines as I read, into a spiral notebook. At the time I had no idea that other people had ever fallen victim to this odd behavior. Now 25 years later I am still an incurable quotation addict, but it was not until recently that I actually learned about the genre. I've had a quarter-century of my own experience collecting and sharing and quoting and misquoting, but I was not aware that anyone had studied so completely the history and scope of the world of quotation. Mr Willis Goth Regier is one such expert, and he shares his knowledge of "quotology" in this fascinating book.

He explains the parts of quotations; types of quotations; the complex struggles and long history of misquotation; plagiarism; quotations as weapons; quoting out of context; wit in quotations; trends and fashion of quotation; self-quotation (guilty as charged!), among many other topics and of course provides numerous well-chosen quotations to illustrate points. There is also information about the various methods used throughout the ages for indicating quotations in print. Did you know that quotation marks did not become widely used until the 18th century?

I was especially interested by the history of quotation collections, including the types of collections (my favorite of the terms being florilegia - "books of flowers" - which are quotation miscellanies); their pioneers, including an interesting section on the famous Mr Bartlett; the burst of quotation publications starting in the mid-1800s; the gradual inclusion of women authors, etc.

I was shocked to learn that there has been some prejudice against the use of quotation, for various reasons as covered in the book - Maria Edgeworth, for example, who "grumbled against vandals who ruined immortal works by quoting the life out of them." However, Mr Regier also tells of times where one's ability to quote has been prized - e.g., a certain government that seemed to rank women by how well they memorized poetry.

The page notes and works cited list are amazingly detailed and helpful (70 pages of references for 167 pages of content - impressive!). Not only is the content great but the book itself is stylish. The front cover has a beautiful design, and the title page and pages indicating the start of new sections are solid black with white lettering - modern and striking. And there are cool quote marks on the front and back covers as well as on the first and last pages.

In all things quotation-related, I am utterly pleased with this book. I have notes scribbled everywhere inside and passages marked that I want to go back and read later, as well as little hearts drawn in the margins where a particular part reminded me of the same issues or feelings I've had in my life as a quotographer.

My favorite quotation from the book: "Quotology disdains no quotations whatsoever, a duty it bears stoutly, with bloodshot eyes and sagging shelves." I feel as if this must be the ending to a prayer belonging to dedicated quotation collectors everywhere, and that I should quote it aloud followed by a hearty "Amen!" Give us this day our daily bread and our quote of the day, and forgive us our misquotings, as we also have forgiven our misquoters.