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eBook How to Write: Advice and Reflections download

by Richard Rhodes

eBook How to Write: Advice and Reflections download ISBN: 0688149480
Author: Richard Rhodes
Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (October 16, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1599 kb
Fb2: 1613 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mobi lrf rtf azw
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Writing Research and Publishing Guides

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Just finished reading Richard Rhodes's excellent HOW TO WRITE: ADVICE AND REFLECTIONS. In "How to Write," Rhodes provides a succinct overview of the tools and motivation needed to start and complete writing. I picked it up because I so admired Rhodes's THE MAKING OF THE ATOMIC BOMB and other works. HOW TO WRITE is one of the best books about the craft I've ever read (and I've read many dozens). He finishes by providing perspectives from other writers as well.

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How to Write: Advice and Reflections. In this brilliant and gripping medical detective story. Richard Rhodes follows virus hunters on three continents as they track the emergence of a deadly new brain disease that first kills cannibals in New Guinea, then cattle and young people in Britain an. John James Audubon. John James Audubon came to America as a dapper eighteen-year-old eager to make his fortune.

Uniquely fusing practical advice on writing with his own insights into the craft, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Rhodes constructs beautiful prose about the issues would-be writers are most afraid to articulate: How do I dare write? Where do I begin? What do I do with this story I have to tell.

Uniquely fusing practical advice on writing with his own insights into the craft, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Rhodes constructs beautiful prose about the issues would-be writers are most afraid to articulate: How do I dare write? Where do I begin? What do I do with this story I have to tell that fills and breaks my heart? Rich with personal vignettes about Rhode's sources of inspiration, How to Write is also a memoir of one of the most original and celebrated writers of our day. Leer más. Contraer.

The 7 Best Books I’ve Ever Read About Writing. Written by. Ambrose Heron. 975. 23. Darius Foroux. Nov 7, 2016 · 1 min read. How to Write: Advice and Reflections by Richard Rhodes is an excellent book about writing. uk/books/about/How to Write. html?id NJkjmZikSlkC&redir esc y. Write the first response. Welcome to a place where words matter. On Medium, smart voices and original ideas take center stage - with no ads in sight.

Rhodes delivers exactly what he promises: advice and reflections. He illustrates both with examples from his own work, sometimes detailed examples. If you like Rhodes' work, this is a great book to read. If you are a writer or aspiring writer, it is also a great book to read. HOW TO WRITE: Advice and Reflections.

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Rhodes has published 23 books and numerous articles for national magazines. His best-known work, The Making of the Atomic Bomb, was published in 1986 and earned him the Pulitzer Prize and numerous other awards.

Uniquely fusing practical advice on writing with his own insights into the craft, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Rhodes constructs beautiful prose about the issues would-be writers are most afraid to articulate: How do I dare write? Where do I begin? What do I do with this story I have to tell that fills and breaks my heart? Rich with personal vignettes about Rhode's sources of inspiration, How to Write is also a memoir of one of the most original and celebrated writers of our day.

Comments: (7)
Dianalmeena
There are, I think, three great American writers of modern non-fiction. The acknowledged master is John McPhee, whose New Yorker pieces and books laid out a clear and elegant style that writers have tried to emulate for the past half century. Another is Tracy Kidder (author of, inter alia, The Soul of a New Machine), who is very much a devotee of McPhee and has acknowledged as much, saying "McPhee has been my model. He's the most elegant of all the journalists writing today, I think." The third is the author of this book, Richard Rhodes. He differs somewhat from McPhee and Kidder in that he has published both fiction and non-fiction (or "verity," as he likes to call it) and his books have been more historical than contemporary. But he shares with the other two a clear and straightforward style, free from affectation, that paints a vivid, real, picture of his chosen subject. My own writing has been far more modest than that of these three (magazine articles, parodies, and a lot of reviews) but I've tried to emulate, as much as I can, the styles of these three masters.

Rhodes begins with a few assertions that run contrary to much of the accepted wisdom in writing programs. How do you become a writer? You write. As one advert told him, you start by "putting ass to chair." All forms of writing are equally worthwhile, and equally helpful in your development as a writer. It's as difficult to write really good genre fiction as it is to write good literature. Any sort of writing, if done with care and attention to craft, will advance a writer's skills; Rhodes himself began his career writing and editing an in-house newspaper for Hallmark Cards. That job taught him several things, including how to turn out finished, presentable work five days a week without waiting for inspiration to strike.

Writing, Rhodes stresses, is a craft, whether it's editing an industrial newsletter or writing free verse for poetry journals. Creative writing students are often told that there are no rules, but that's not really true; the writer is confronted with a number of choices that will strongly constrain the structure and flow of their work. Rhodes begins with the question of voice: Should I write my story or article or review as a first person narrative? Omniscient point of view? Present tense? Past tense? First person, present tense, narrative is a way of involving the reader more deeply in a story, but at the same time it constrains the narrative to what the narrator has experienced directly. A first person narrator can't know that someone is waiting for him/her just around the corner. How do you begin a story? The question is applicable to both fiction and non-fiction. Do you begin and the beginning, or dive right into the middle to grab the reader's interest, and then fill in the history? And one that non-writers always ask of fiction writers- where do fictional characters come from? For Rhodes, there's a parallel with acting. Characters are extensions of some aspect of the writer, extended, fleshed out, and made whole. Other writers, like F. Scott Fitzgerald, begin by writing a small biography of each character, the likes, dislikes, opinions, and tastes. How do you name them? Baby name books are a very useful tool. What's important is that the characters are distinct people, recognizable as individuals, and not (as can easily happen) all variation on the writers own personality.

Rhodes also devotes a lot of his attention to the mechanics of non-fiction. How do you conduct an interview? (Tip: Make sure your recorder has fresh batteries!) Some of his advice is a bit dated in this age of Google ( was published in 1995, twenty years ago as I write this!) but the underlying principles still hold: Use multiple sources. Make sure you understand the facts you're presenting. Use the right word. Get the context right. And so on. The chapter on editing your own work contains a section in which Rhodes re-creates his own editing process, using selections from his published work, showing how choices were made in phrasing, flow, choice of words and so on. It's particularly inspiring to the novice reader to see that even the best writers still struggle with choices. Rhodes' advice goes beyond the mechanics of writing and into the business of writing. How you you sell a story? What payment can you expect? What's the best way to market your work? Again,some of the advice is somewhat dated, but much still remains applicable to today's Internet-dominated world. Rhodes also reminds the prospective writer that publishing doesn't only mean selling though a publisher. It can mean giving copies away, public readings, or self-publishing- something that's more practical, and easier than ever in today's Internet-enabled world.

I've read a lot of books that attempt to teach the craft of writing, and I've gotten something out of most, but none has been so complete, and so inspirational as this one volume. Strongly recommended for anyone who wants to write better, or wants to publish what they've written, and especially those wondering how to begin.
Saimath
I've recently read several books on writing, and this is the best. I am reading it for the third time. Rhodes encourages and challenges. While not totally discounting the "magic" side of writing, and in fact applauding it, he instructs on the practical necessity of structuring a piece. I recommend him for his openness and personal examples and his nuts-and-bolts advice for starting and finishing.
Taulkree
Got all sorts of great information out of it including how to focus better, and how to set up my writing process. The author is very experienced, and gives great insight into the thought process that has helped him do such an amazing job over the years. He's a master, and I am his student.
kewdiepie
Very informative and helpful book. I like the way he writes!
Aiata
I just received my book. It is unmarked and the the quality is as advertised. Thanks
Lianeni
Just finished reading Richard Rhodes's excellent HOW TO WRITE: ADVICE AND REFLECTIONS. I picked it up because I so admired Rhodes's THE MAKING OF THE ATOMIC BOMB and other works. HOW TO WRITE is one of the best books about the craft I've ever read (and I've read many dozens). Highly recommended.
Kamick
Richard Rhodes' writing chops are unassailable. His majestic "The Making of the Atomic Bomb" combines thorough historiography with a lyrical style that makes reading it educational and enthralling. One learns not only of the history of the single most important invention of the 20th century, but also of the remarkable lives of the men and women involved. Given the pleasure I gained from reading it, I looked forward to reading Rhodes' short primer, "How to Write: Advice and Reflections," to learn more about the author and his writing approach.
In "How to Write," Rhodes provides a succinct overview of the tools and motivation needed to start and complete writing. His chapters progress through topics, in order: motivation to write, tools, research, writing, editing, and publishing. He finishes by providing perspectives from other writers as well. Given his background as a magazine essayist and his drive for fact-based underpinnings, even in his fiction works, Rhodes is best to read for his advice on non-fiction writing. His best section is his chapter on editing where he shows the evolution of a specific non-fiction piece and the author's thought process during writing and editing.
My one issue with this book is that some of his passages come across with a bit of braggadocio -- he often, perhaps rightfully, quotes his own writing, he calls out his extensive publishing history, and even mentions his substantial income level. His pride in how far he has come in life is evident, and yields a somewhat pedantic tone, perhaps stemming from insecurity (a result perhaps of his difficult childhood, noted in the book). This tone is softened somewhat by his last chapter where he brings in thoughts from other authors. My recommendation in the end is to buy this book, less for the autobiographical call-outs, and more for its technical advice and clear depiction of the work and strength needed to truly write well.