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eBook Ferdinand Verbiest, S.J. (1623–1688) and the Chinese Heaven: The Composition of his Astronomical Corpus and its Reception in the European Republic of Letters (Leuven Chinese Studies) download

by Noel Golvers

eBook Ferdinand Verbiest, S.J. (1623–1688) and the Chinese Heaven: The Composition of his Astronomical Corpus and its Reception in the European Republic of Letters (Leuven Chinese Studies) download ISBN: 905867293X
Author: Noel Golvers
Publisher: Leuven University Press; 1 edition (January 1, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 676
ePub: 1818 kb
Fb2: 1648 kb
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Category: Reference
Subcategory: Writing Research and Publishing Guides

Leuven Chinese Studies XII by Noël Golvers. In discussing the development of historical studies of theChinese in North America in the second half of the 20th century, this paper examines how OverseasChinese studies was established as a specific.

Leuven Chinese Studies XII by Noël Golvers. Article · January 2005 with 7 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. From the early 1960s, Chinese immigrant intellectuals inthe Canadian and American West Coast authored histories of the overseas Chinese in Chinese.

By Noël Golvers Golvers sets out the contents of the book and the relationship between the various segments in the various manuscript copies; he considers the public for which Verbiest.

Leuven Chinese Studies, 1. Leuven: Leuven University Press/Ferdinand Verbiest Foundation, K. U. Leuven. Golvers sets out the contents of the book and the relationship between the various segments in the various manuscript copies; he considers the public for which Verbiest was writing and his aims; he outlines the sources upon which Verbiest drew, and gives a detailed material bibliography of the corpus.

This book describes more than 220 copies, nearly all of European provenance, of various astronomical publications by Ferdinand Verbiest, .

Ferdinand Verbiest, SJ (1623–1688) and the Chinese Heaven: The Composition of the Astronomical Corpus, Its Diffusion and Reception in the European Republic of Letters. Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2003. Witek,, John . e. Ferdinand Verbiest (1623–1688): Jesuit Missionary, Scientist, Engineer and Diplomat. Nettetal: Steyler Verlag, 1994. Nicolas Standaert, SJ.

Golvers, Noël, Ferdinand Verbiest, and Ferdinand Verbiest Foundation. Ferdinand Verbiest, . 1623–1688) and the Chinese Heaven: The Composition of the Astronomical Corpus, its Diffusion and Reception in the European Republic of Letters. Leuven: Leuven University Press: Ferdinand Verbiest Foundation, . Jesuit Observations and StarMappings in Beijing as the Transmission of Scientific Knowledge. History of Mathematical Sciences: Portugal and East Asia II, Scientific Practices and the Portuguese Expansion in Asia (1498–1759)

For literary Chinese my reference grammar is Edwin G. Pulleyblank, Outline of Classical Chinese Grammar (Vancouver, 1995).

For literary Chinese my reference grammar is Edwin G. 1 Theodore N. Foss, ‘The European Sojourn of Philippe Couplet and Michael Shen Fuzong, 1683-1692’, in. Jerome Heyndrickx (e., Philippe Couplet, . 1623-1693): The Man who Brought China to Europe (Nettetal, 1990), pp. 121-40; Nicolas Standaert, Handbook of Christianity in China.

Two overlooked letters of Ferdinand Verbiest to A. Kircher. Jesuit correspondence from China: the two ‘Tartary letters’ of Ferdinand. How a. missionary project was shaped, and Kircher's books were received in mid-17th century Spain and Portugal’, in: Humanistica Lovaniensia, LIV, 2005, pp. 267 – 284 (nos 5 and 8). - ‘The missionary and his concern about consolidation and continuity: Ferdinand Verbiest’s astronomica and the public relations of the China Mission in the last decades of the 17th century’, in: N. Golvers &  .

In his Astronomia Europaea, published 1687 in Dillingen, Ferdinand Verbiest (1623-1688), coryphée of the Jesuit Mission in China, describes concisely yet detailed how European astronomy, namely the European way to calculate the Chinese calendar and to predict lunar and solar eclipses.

In his Astronomia Europaea, published 1687 in Dillingen, Ferdinand Verbiest (1623-1688), coryphée of the Jesuit Mission in China, describes concisely yet detailed how European astronomy, namely the European way to calculate the Chinese calendar and to predict lunar and solar eclipses, succeeded in resuming its former position after the persecution under the Oboi regency (1664-1669)

Includesdiscussion of his instruments]. GOLVERS, Noël, Ferdinand Verbiest, . 1623-1688) and the Chinese Heaven.

Includesdiscussion of his instruments]. TheComposition of the Astronomical Corpus, its Diffusion and Reception in the European Republicof Letters (Leuven: University Press, Ferdinand Verbiest Foundation, . ISBN 90 5867 293 X. [Describes more than 220 copies of various publications byVerbiest

This book describes more than 220 copies, nearly all of European provenance, of various astronomical publications by Ferdinand Verbiest, S.J. (1623-1688), either xylographical copies sent from Peking (reports, instrument drawings, eclipse maps, ephemerides, stellar maps), or copies of Astronomia Europaea (a Bencard edition from Dillingen, 1687). This multiplies the number of known copies by ten.

The first part of this book describes the characteristics of this astronomical corpus - one of the most spectacular bibliographical testimonia of the Jesuit presence in 17-18th century China, and disentangles the complex mutual interrelationship between the various items of this corpus.

Moreover, by investigating handwritten dedications and owner's marks, material indications and external testimonia, Golvers sketches the history of the shipments of these documents to Europe, connecting them to the late 1670s, to Ph. Couplet's European 'tour' (1683-1692) and to the presence of A. Thomas, S.J. in Peking (late-1685 - 1709). Behind all these shipments, there is the personal effort of F. Verbiest, and his own handwriting can be recognised in many pieces. After his death, also the French and German Jesuits in Peking continued this diffusion process, albeit to a lesser extent, in their relations with France, the German countries and St. Petersburg.

In the last part of this monograph, several cases are discussed which illustrate how in the 17th-18th centuries European scholars 'received' these documents, for their astronomical, sinological, historical, linguistic or purely bibliophile aspect. In this part of the inquiry, unknown aspects of the history of many early Chinese collections in Europe are discussed.

All in all, this research measures, for the first time, the penetration of Jesuit publications on China in contemporary Europe in quantitative and geographical-historical terms. It also traces the different motivations of these dispatches (i.e.) public relations; apology for the particular evangelisation methods; offering bibliophile curios in return for support).

This abundantly illustrated publication (ac. 60 ill.; 6 tables and 4 maps) represents not only a substantial contribution to the history of the Jesuit mission in China and the methods applied, but is also a advancement in our knowledge of the history of western astronomy in East Asia, and of the Sino-Jesuit printed materials preserved in European collections.