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eBook Molly Ivins: A Rebel Life download

by W. Michael Smith,Bill Minutaglio

eBook Molly Ivins: A Rebel Life download ISBN: 1586487175
Author: W. Michael Smith,Bill Minutaglio
Publisher: PublicAffairs; First Edition edition (November 10, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 334
ePub: 1931 kb
Fb2: 1689 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mbr rtf txt doc
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Writing Research and Publishing Guides

In this book, authors Bill Minutaglio and W. Michael Smith tackle the subject with impressive results

In this book, authors Bill Minutaglio and W. Michael Smith tackle the subject with impressive results to everyone and anyone. Especially praiseworthy is the fact that the authors manage to present, discuss and contextualize every aspect of Ivins' life while staying away from two mistakes that could've easily been made: romanticizing her and judging her alcoholism.

Bill Minutaglio, W. Michael Smith. Hachette UK, 10 нояб. She was a groomed for a gilded life in moneyed Houston, but Molly Ivins left the country club behind to become one of the most provocative, courageous, and influential journalists in American history. Bill Minutaglio is a professor of journalism at the University of Texas and author of several critically acclaimed books, including the first unauthorized biography of George W. Bush, First Son: George W. Bush & The Bush Family Dynasty.

Minutaglio, the author of a well-received Bush biography, First Son, and Smith, who spent six years . While chockablock with colorful anecdotes and psychological insights, Molly Ivins: A Rebel Life isn’t convincing as the biography of a significant figure in journalism.

While chockablock with colorful anecdotes and psychological insights, Molly Ivins: A Rebel Life isn’t convincing as the biography of a significant figure in journalism.

In this book, authors Bill Minutaglio and W. Molly Ivins: A Rebel Life. New York: PublicAffairs, 2009. Molly Ivins: A Rebel’s Life might better have been entitled Becoming Molly Ivins

Bill Minutaglio, W. The Life and Times of Molly Ivins. Molly Ivins: A Rebel’s Life might better have been entitled Becoming Molly Ivins. The book primarily recounts the inner life of the Texas journalist (August 30, 1944 to January 31, 2007). We get a 230-page build-up describing Ivins’s professional and private life from 1944 to 1993, when syndication.

Bill Minutaglio and W. Michael Smith have elegantly bottled up her enduring charm in this winner of a book. A real page-turning hoot. A Rebel Life could easily have reduced Ivins’s life to a kind of ongoing dialectic: public persona versus private person, expectations versus here’s where you can put your expectations. It could have also devolved into a simple study of the journalist’s body of work. But thankfully, the authors resist reductive aesthetics in favor of something both more challenging and more rewarding: empathy.

Burton, Michael C. John Henry Faulk: The Making of a Liberated Mind: A Biography. Austin: Eakin Press, 1993. A World of Ideas II. Main Street Books. ISBN 978-0-385-41665-8. a b c Ivins, Molly (July–August 1990).

Author and University of Texas professor Bill Minutaglio sheds some light on the unknown aspects of the woman's exceptional life with Molly Ivins: A Rebel Life, a book he co-authored with W. Minutaglio will sign and discuss the book today during his appearance at Brazos Bookstore. For information, call 713-523-0701 or visit ww. razosbookstore.

by Bill Minutaglio, W.

She was a groomed for a gilded life in moneyed Houston, but Molly Ivins left the country club behind to become one of the most provocative, courageous, and influential journalists in American history. Presidents and senators called her for advice; her column ran in 400 newspapers; her books, starting with Molly Ivins Can't Say That, Can She?, were bestsellers. But despite her fame, few people really knew her: what her background was, who influenced her, how her political views developed, or how many painful struggles she fought.

Molly Ivins is a comprehensive, definitive narrative biography, based on intimate knowledge of Molly, interviews with her family, friends, and colleagues, and access to a treasure trove of her personal papers. Written in a rollicking style, it is at once the saga of a powerful, pugnacious woman muscling her way to the top in a world dominated by men; a fascinating look behind the scenes of national media and politics; and a sobering account of the toll of addiction and cancer. Molly Ivins adds layers of depth and complexity to the story of an American legend—a woman who inspired people both to laughter and action.

Comments: (7)
Otrytrerl
Molly Ivins was a funny, incisive, brilliant observer of the American political landscape. Her years covering the Texas "lege" had given her a nose for smelling a skunk before it sprayed. She delighted her readers with her witty descriptions and analyses of politicians and their foibles. She called George W. Bush "Shrub" which perfectly described the less than brilliant son of the original Bush. She gave Texas Gov. Rick Perry the name "governor good hair" by which he is still known today.
Molly was an upcruster from a wealthy Republican family who was quick to see how "things worked" by observing her own father and his cronies as they wheeled and dealed in the Houston of the oil boom. She was smart, well-educated, spoke French, and could slide from an East Coast cultured voice into her downhome Texas twang when she needed to in order to get the story that she wanted.
Her life was not an easy one. It's never easy when a person realizes that their parents' life and social milieu and political positions totally conflict with ones own view of the world. She spent her life dealing with that confict. It took a toll emotionally and physically and psychologically BUT at the end of the day, she was a voice that spoke to a lot of people -- even the ones who didn't agree with her political views could never deny that she could get to the heart of an issue quickly and expose it and make it comprehensible to the reading public.
I miss Molly Ivins and reading this book which was written by two people who knew her well made me realize once again that when we lose a voice like hers, we lose a lot.
Rude
Molly Ivins was a larger-than-life character... which makes her a very tough subject to write about. In this book, authors Bill Minutaglio and W. Michael Smith tackle the subject with impressive results.
"Molly Ivins: A Rebel Life" is a loving portrait of an amazing woman who somehow managed to overcome the boring future she seemed destined to live and became a witty writer with guts to spare and much to say... to everyone and anyone. Especially praiseworthy is the fact that the authors manage to present, discuss and contextualize every aspect of Ivins' life while staying away from two mistakes that could've easily been made: romanticizing her and judging her alcoholism. Instead, the book is a bittersweet celebration of a journalist that became one of the most feared/beloved pens both in Texas and the US as a whole.
As a small bonus, the book is written in that brilliantly ironic, fast-paced prose that has become Minutaglio's signature.
I won't bore you to death with my review: this book is thoroughly researched, scrupulously accurate and beautifully written, making it a hard read to put down. Heck, even the pictures are great! If you're even remotely interested in journalists, biographies, Texas, political humor, Molly or journalism in general, this is a must-have for you. Oh, while you're at it, do yourself a favor and pick up "City on fire" too... you'll end up wondering why the hell no one has made it into a movie yet. Happy reading.
Stonewing
I haven't finished it yet, but ran through another 70 or so pages last week while doing jury duty. But this book has so informed me about someone who was literally an icon in progressive thinking. If you can imagine Matt Drudge carrying anyone's column outside of the majority who are slightly to the right of Attila the Hun, then you have to know that Molly had the kind of authority -- earned baby earned -- and grit that few had. Her childhood in Houston, well off with a hard driving unforgiving father and a mother who simply did what dad told her to, to the early loss of the love of her life the book details her meteoric rise in the world of mainstrain (read Republican) newspapers in the Southwest and Midwest. Molly Ivins could say things like no one else could. She covered the Texas Legislature (the lege as she called it) when there were mostly D's and a handful of R's ... and believe me she was as scathing and on point about the D's as she ever was about the R's. When she saw folly, racism, bigotry, financial scams, idolatry whatever --she called it as she saw it. And she was always right on point! This is a wonderful book -- buy it, read it, sleep on it, and keep it in your library forever. It's that good. Written with her assistant and Bill Minutaglio, an author in his own right.
Hadadel
I loved Molly Ivins. Miss her. What a gutsy lady. And from Texas! I lived through most of the history expounded about Molly and read her columns religiously. Didn't know about all the drinking and smoking, but it didn't hurt her style. After this bio, I wish I could have been part of her life in some small way. I went to The University in the 1980s, and this bio captures the Austin spirit and ambiance exactly. Makes me want to go back. God bless, Molly. Hey, maybe a road trip with a couple of her books. Sounds like a f***kin' plan!
Neol
I was a big fan of Molly, so I am glad I read the book to learn more about her life. The book does seem to give an idea of what she was like and how her life was lived. I must admit I struggled with the presentation of all the listings of connections, awards, schools, aquaintances, and multitude of other details. I use the word listing, because they were often noted without much context. At times I felt the authors were writing a resume, rather than a biography. I believe the book would have been much better with more of her quotes and columns. All-in-all, I thought it dry for a biography about such an interesting and lively person. I believe I'm going to order one of her old books as a means of celebrating her wonderful sense of humor.
Banal
What a book!

Being a homegrown Texan, Molly has long been my hero. Minutaglio and Smith did a remarkable job of bringing Molly to us in this book as she really was - warts and all. And still you can't help but love her.

You will be astonished at the demons she lived with her whole life but was still able to write prolifically. And in the end you will cry as she struggles with the cancer that finally killed her.

This is one of the best books I've read in a while.