carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Social Variation in the Creole language: The Middle Class versus the Working Class

eBook Social Variation in the Creole language: The Middle Class versus the Working Class download

by Zahira Mosaheb

eBook Social Variation in the Creole language: The Middle Class versus the Working Class download ISBN: 3838391411
Author: Zahira Mosaheb
Publisher: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing (August 9, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 68
ePub: 1821 kb
Fb2: 1645 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mobi azw txt lit
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Words Language and Grammar

The Middle Class versus the Working Class. By (author) : Zahira Mosaheb.

The Middle Class versus the Working Class. This study aims to observe patterns of variation amongst working class and middle class informants from both genders. At first glance, the dataset seems to yield fairly straightforward results in accordance to the general precepts of the variationist paradigm. Middle class females are in favour of the more formal variants and working class males opt for the most vernacular ones. In addition, males seem to stick to the vernacular in contrast to their female counterparts.

Middle class has an important role because is an intermediate between the classes higher and the laboring class. People in middle class often are employed as professionals, managers,etc. However, they are not rich.

type of social dialect working class speech, upper-middle class speech (or lower). Aka black english/ebonics. this is a variety used by many AA in many different regions of the US. w/ distinct set of social markers. class (a characteristic of a social dialect). pronunciation or word. African american vernacular English (AAVE). the casual speech style used by many African amer.

The term middle class was coined by James Bradshaw in a 1745 pamphlet Scheme to prevent running Irish Wools to France. The term has had various, even contradictory, meanings

The term middle class was coined by James Bradshaw in a 1745 pamphlet Scheme to prevent running Irish Wools to France. The term has had various, even contradictory, meanings.

The new middle class, the information revolution and the dispossessed masses, including migrant workers in the background of the huge concentration of wealth of the ruling regimes represent the socio-economic reality of the Middle East that will be present in international.

The new middle class, the information revolution and the dispossessed masses, including migrant workers in the background of the huge concentration of wealth of the ruling regimes represent the socio-economic reality of the Middle East that will be present in international politics in the next decade.

Codification: standardising its structural or linguistic features (dictionaries, grammar books to be written, et. Elaboration: extending its.

its own unique accent, grammar, and vocabulary features, African-American Vernacular English is employed by middle-class African Americans as the more informal and casual end of a sociolinguistic continuum; on the formal end of this continuum, middle-class African Americans switch to more standard English grammar and vocabulary, usually while retaining elements of the nonstandard accent. The abolitionist papers before the war form a rich corpus of examples of plantation creole.

This study aims to observe patterns of variation amongst working class and middle class informants from both genders. At first glance, the dataset seems to yield fairly straightforward results in accordance to the general precepts of the variationist paradigm. Middle class females are in favour of the more formal variants and working class males opt for the most vernacular ones. In addition, males seem to stick to the vernacular in contrast to their female counterparts. The correlation between gender and class also shows a preference for vernacular variants by the working class male informants. However, when scrutinised further, it has been observed that the variation is to a great extent erratic both at inter and intra speaker level, resulting in atypical variation in some cases. This study, then, attempts to link such instances of atypical variation firstly to hypercorrection resulting from linguistic insecurity and secondly to attitudinal factors impacting on the use of Mauritian Creole. Lastly, this study highlights the difficulty in establishing a post-Creole continuum in the Mauritian context and shows that the notion of style variation proves to be much more helpful.