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by Philip K. Dick

eBook The Man Whose Teeth Were All Exactly Alike download ISBN: 0586085637
Author: Philip K. Dick
Publisher: Paladin; paperback / softback edition (1986)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1573 kb
Fb2: 1989 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: doc lit mobi mbr
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Words Language and Grammar

The Man Whose Teeth Were All Exactly Alike is a realist, non-science fiction novel by American writer Philip K. Dick.

The Man Whose Teeth Were All Exactly Alike is a realist, non-science fiction novel by American writer Philip K. Originally completed in 1960, this book was initially rejected by potential publishers, and posthumously published by a small press in 1984, two years after Dick's death. Sometime between 1958 and 1962, Leo Runcible, a Liberal Jew, is working in the real estate field.

Tor books by philip k. Voices from the Street. Humpty Dumpty in Oakland. In Milton Lumky Territory. Being a grammar school teacher in a small rural town had made him tactful

Tor books by philip k. The Man Whose Teeth Were All Exactly Alike. This is a work of fiction. Being a grammar school teacher in a small rural town had made him tactful. He dealt with parents who were farm people, fundamentalists in religion as well as in politics and all social ideas. In his class he had great lumpy twelve-year-old boys from the ranches, near morons who could barely be taught to read. They would eventually go back to the ranch and become milkers; their lives were mapped out.

With them was a third man whom he had never seen before. There were several cars parked in front. A book fell from his arms and struck the ground, its leaves fluttering. The man started back, hesitated, then continued on towards them. The vet recognized him, now.

Easily the WORST Philip K Dick book I've read. I have to say his non science fiction work is very disappointing. Jan 14, 2012 David rated it liked it. Shelves: 2012, purged-books. His non-scifi books should be the same but they are not they are filled with the dullest and most annoying suburbanities. The Man Whose Teeth Were All Exactly Alike, Philip K Dick, 304 pg. This book is from PKD's selection of non-science-fiction stories. If I remember correctly, he wrote most of these stories early on in his career; they weren't very popular and remained unpublished until fairly recently.

Philip K. Dick shows his humor in this mainstream novel. This is basically about a practical joke gone wild

Philip K. This is basically about a practical joke gone wild. Dick is the author who brought you the stories that so many movies have been made from including Bladerunner. Eventually, I would get them all, but there were still his unpublished books to get: Mary and the Giant, Puttering About in a Small Land, etc.

He may be a man of principle, but Liberal Jewish Leo is an outsider in the lilywhite Carquinez, Marin County. Though not quite as good as his next book, The Man in the High Castle, The Man Whose Teeth Were All Exactly Alike is an extremely readable novel. When he gets into a pointless argument with a customer over his neighbour Walt Dombrosio's house guests, the resulting ramifications follow a bizarre logic of cause and effect to lead in entirely unexpected directions. It is filled with characters and conflict that were to become Dick's trademark. A must read for Philip K. Dick fans.

He’s down in town, at the Chevron Station. He wants to know how to get up here. dly wait to the end. He got up from his desk before she had finished her sentence; striding by her, he picked up the phone. Hello, Tony, he said, with all the force and geniality he could create; he let it flow from him-it rolled out, pleasing him; his own joyfulness buoyed him up, swept him on. How was the drive over our little hill?

He may be a man of principle, but Liberal Jewish Leo is an outsider in the lilywhite Carquinez, Marin County. More by Philip K.

Originally completed in 1960, this book was initially rejected by potential publishers, and posthumously published by a small press in 1984, two years after Dick's death. Between 1958 and 1962, Leo Runcible works in the real estate field.

Comments: (7)
Hamrl
The story here doesn't come to a point in any traditional sense. But the characters are exceedingly well-illustrated, and you get sucked into their strange (and relatively bleak) journey.

If compared against Dick's "science-fiction" books, this novel possesses many similar qualities. It's so imaginative that you can taste it. It's wild, and it's clever. It aims to go deep into its characters' personalities and psyches - and sometimes reveals much about the author's mindset. It's the work of an extremely capable, and ambitious author.

But I can see why this wouldn't work for a straighter "literary" audience. His writing is generally diffuse. He likes to let plot threads ramble and drift, in the style of the Van Vogt books which inspired him; he aims for imitation of nature's chaos rather than genuflecting to accepted norms of writing. A science-fiction audience is more naturally prepared for this approach. If you write for a straighter audience, and the book meditates in parts about race relations and sexual relationships, they're probably going to expect some type of coherent point delivered to them that touches on these matters.

It's a darned good book. I do recommend it. But you should understand what you're in for. 4 1/2 stars.
Skunk Black
This book that I'm more than 3/4 through is turning out to be one of my favorites, right up there with Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? It is not without reason that of Dick's nonsci-fi, this book was the one he liked the most. To my thinking it splits the difference between the drama of Confessions of a Crap Artist and the realism of Milton Lumpkin Territory. One thing that I will say is that publisher gives too much away on the dust jacket, and what would have been an unexpected plot twist is somewhat neutralized. A good read on its own, but it is also great to compare with his other works.
JOGETIME
Philip K. Dick shows his humor in this mainstream novel. This is basically about a practical joke gone wild. Dick is the author who brought you the stories that so many movies have been made from including Bladerunner. His science fiction is awesome, his mainstream less known and not as consistent, but worth checking out, some are very good, others not so, but this is a jewel.
Iseared
I read this book after being very impressed by PKDs Humpty Dumpty in Oakland, which was the first non-science fiction book of the author that I had read. Again I am very impressed by the way the book is written.

The story takes place in the early 60s in a rural community. Interesting as this set-up might be for a European born in 1986 this is admittedly not the most fascinating time and place. However this would not be a PKD book if all of the people living in this rural community wouldn't be paranoid, miserable or, most often, both.

The brilliantly written thought patterns of the characters in this book is so enticing that the main story line about the man whose teeth were all exactly alike is not even that important but more a way by which the author drives the characters into certain thought and action patterns that cause them to be ever more distrustful and destructive to themselves and those around them.

While not the happiest of books (like many of PKDs works) it is wonderfully written and very enticing. The time and place, with for example the pressing idea that women should be at home and men should be earning money made the story all the more interesting.

Highly recommended
Malhala
I first became a fan of Philip K. Dick shortly after his death, before his popularity had hit its full stride. Picking up his books in the early 1980s was sometimes a bit of a treasure hunt: while a few were readily available (such as Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, The Man in the High Castle), others were quite elusive, like The Man Who Japed or The World Jones Made. Eventually, I would get them all, but there were still his unpublished books to get: Mary and the Giant, Puttering About in a Small Land, etc. One title always stood out among these works: The Man Whose Teeth Were All Exactly Alike. At long last, I have had a chance to buy and read this book.

Like much of PKD's posthumously published books, The Man Whose Teeth Were All Exactly Alike is not a science fiction novel but rather a mainstream story of life for a pair of 1950s Marin County, California couples. Leo Runcible is a successful real estate agent who likes to think of himself as liberal: when a neighbor has a black man as a dinner guest, Leo defends the neighbor's right to do so, at the cost of a friendship and a business deal. Nevertheless, Leo is bitter at the neighbor, Walt Dombrosio, for creating the provocative situation, and soon gets his revenge by getting Walt arrested for drunk driving.

Walt loses his license and is dependent on his wife to transport him daily to work. For Walt, this will cause damage to his marriage and eventually lead him to his own revenge against Leo, which will have consequences no one could have anticipated. The wives, meanwhile have their own issues to deal with. Leo's wife, Janet, is almost pathologically neurotic and has an uncanny ability to make any situation worse. Sherry Dombrosio is the only reasonably well-adjusted character among the four, but saddled with the brutish Walt, she will also be the one who suffers the most.

Was the book worth the quarter-century wait? Well, it's good, but it's not THAT good. As with much of PKD's posthumously published books, this is not quite Dick at his best, which is probably why it never was published earlier. Also, for those fans expecting his wonderful science fiction, this work could be disappointing. For PKD completists, however, this should be a worthy addition to their collections.
Nawenadet
This is the first straight PKD book I read and I loved it. All the essential themes are there: troubled marriage, competing professionals, theorising, although no androids this time as it's set in the "real world".

As for the edition itself - the book and its font are rather big and it's inconvinient to carry this book around.
Shomeshet
Not that good