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eBook There Is No Zoo in Zoology: And Other Beastly Mispronunciations download

by Charles Harrington Elster

eBook There Is No Zoo in Zoology: And Other Beastly Mispronunciations download ISBN: 0020318308
Author: Charles Harrington Elster
Publisher: Wiley (January 19, 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 208
ePub: 1313 kb
Fb2: 1849 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf mbr azw docx
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Words Language and Grammar

Elster explains how he was sensitized from a young age to the careful use and pronunciation of words. His special interest led him to produce this book and a sequel ("Is There a Cow in Moscow?).

Elster explains how he was sensitized from a young age to the careful use and pronunciation of words. The core of his efforts is an alphabetical guide to selected words that are commonly mispronounced. Each entry provides the preferred pronunciation.

Charles Harrington Elster is a writer, broadcaster, and logophile-a lover of words. He is the author and narrator of the audio vocabulary-building program Verbal Advantage and the book by the same name. His other books include Tooth and Nail and Test of Time, vocabulary-building novels for high school students preparing to take the college entrance exams; There's a Word for It, a lighthearted look Charles Harrington Elster is a writer, broadcaster, and logophile-a lover of words

Charles Harrington Elster. How to Tell Fate from Destiny: And Other Skillful Word Distinctions. Charles Harrington Elster.

Charles Harrington Elster. Is There a Cow in Moscow?: More Beastly Mispronunciations and Sound Advice : Another Opinionated Guide for the Well-Spoken. Verbal Advantage: Volume 1. Verbal Advantage Volume 3.

item 1 There Is No Zoo in Zoology: And Other Beastly M. .Additional Product Features. Place of Publication.Book condition very good. item 2 There Is No Zoo in Zoology by Elster, Charles Harrington -There Is No Zoo in Zoology by Elster, Charles Harrington. item 3 There Is No Zoo in Zoology by Elster, Charles -There Is No Zoo in Zoology by Elster, Charles.

The Big Book of Beastly Mispronunciations. by Charles Harrington Elster. Although this volume incorporates my two earlier books on pronunciation, There Is No Zoo in Zoology, and Other Beastly Mispronunciations (1988) and Is There a Cow in Moscow? More Beastly Mispronunciations and Sound Advice (1990), it is by no means merely a reprint or rehash of their contents. Every entry in those books has been revised and updated and every ruling rigorously reexamined.

By (author) Charles Harrington Elster. AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window). Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Charles Harrington Elster believes that yes, it does make a difference (and that, for the record, one should pronounce the word AF-loo-int)

Charles Harrington Elster believes that yes, it does make a difference (and that, for the record, one should pronounce the word AF-loo-int). Where pronunciations commonly vary or dictionaries disagree, Elster is an eager arbiter. Easy to use (there aren't any confusing diacritical marks), and with references from Will Shakespeare to Will Smith (for "aunt") and Jerry Seinfeld (for "clitoris"), this is an excellent argument-settler - and debate-starter. A Houghton Mifflin Paperback original. ISBN 10: 0025352806, ISBN 13: 9780025352803. Standard shipping can on occasion take up to 30 days for delivery. List this Seller's Books.

Incorporates two earlier books on pronunciation There is No Zoo in.book cross references to other words that are pronounced similarly

books on pronunciation 'There is No Zoo in Zoology' (1988) and 'Is There a Cow in Moscow?. A free PowerPoint PPT presentation (displayed as a Flash slide show) on PowerShow. com - id: 2b30d-M2RiY. Incorporates two earlier books on pronunciation There is No Zoo in Zoology (1988) and Is There a Cow in Moscow? (1990). book cross references to other words that are pronounced similarly. author references sources such as William Safire in the New York Times Magazine multiple dictionaries encyclopedias modern English usage guides and pronunciation guides.

Charles Harrington Elster believes that yes, it does make a difference (and that, for the record, one should pronounce the word AF-loo-int). Elster, the author of Is There a Cow in Moscow? and There Is No Zoo in Zoology, has chosen more than six hundred of our most commonly mispronounced words, arranged them alphabetically, and written entertaining essays that unapologetically offer his informed opinion as to why a word should be pronounced a particular way.

Lists nearly four hundred of the most commonly mispronounced words and discusses the history and origins of each word
Comments: (7)
Lanadrta
A friend of mine has this book and I perused it while tending her granddaughter. Some of these I knew, but a lot of them I didn't. Oops!
Quphagie
A fun read. Language is a living thing & this book show that.Loved the comment about how a cartoon duck changed the way we say the word 'despicable.' And a perfect explanation of why there is no zoo in zoology. :)
Rgia
I have read this book twice and continue to us it as a Reference book.
The imformation is detailed and to-the-point. A must read, must have.
Hanad
This is an old and rare find. An amusing and educational book for any generation.
Thetalas
Given as gift to grandson. He is enjoying the resource it provides.
Kulasius
Book was in excellent condition, exactly as advertised
Arcanescar
Sure, that is easy for you to say. 90% of my misspelling is because of pronunciation. No pronounce no chance of spelling it like it sounds. Yew, and the other way around (there I have some excuse) may words do not spell as they sound due to the word base history. But that is a matter for a different book. Or in a last few pages of this book.

In “There is no Zoo in Zoology” we are helped with overcoming many of the most common mis-pronounced words. We start with aberrant a-BER-ant and end with zounds ZOWNDZ.

You will have fun trying it out on people.
Mr. Elster explains how he was sensitized from a young age to the careful use and pronunciation of words. His special interest led him to produce this book and a sequel ("Is There a Cow in Moscow?). The core of his efforts is an alphabetical guide to selected words that are commonly mispronounced. Each entry provides the preferred pronunciation. Many entries go far beyond this and provide some explanation of the word's origin and evolution, a discussion of alternative pronunciations, and witty chatter or anecdotes about the particular unit of language. The book is worthwhile on several levels, and yet troubling in several important ways.

First, it provides an eye-opening and entirely useful guide to better speech through better pronunciation. Second, it opens up the world of words in new ways to the uninitiated, including the tug-of-war battles that go on under the surface for control of our language. In addition, the book motivates the reader to pay better attention to how he or she speaks, which has a huge impact on how others perceive us.

How is it troubling? Well, unless you were raised by English teachers or sticklers for accurate speech, you will realize that you have been laying verbal eggs all your life by repeating pronunciation errors you learned first from family and friends and never bothered to check out in the dictionary. You may begin to despair that your errors are so ingrained you'll never get it right. If that were not enough, you'll begin to realize that if you DID clean up your act and say words the "right" way, many people will assume either that you're saying them wrong (so common are the mispronunciations) or else you acting affected. What is a person to do?

Mr. Elster does come to the rescue. He suggests that you do your best and pay attention to the way you say words, but not obsess about it. He realizes that every time we open our mouths and speak a word, we are voting in the great ongoing language referendum. If enough people decide to say a word a particular way, the more popular dictionaries will eventually follow, leaving only the language purists to complain.

So, we have here a book that is fun, useful, thought-provoking, clever, and well-researched. If it ultimately causes you to be more careful and deliberate about how you speak, it will help you speak in a way that reflects well on your obvious intelligence, illustrated by your decision to acquire Mr. Elster's unique book(s).