carnevalemanfredonia.it

eBook On Language download

by Vincent Torre,William Safire

eBook On Language download ISBN: 0812909372
Author: Vincent Torre,William Safire
Publisher: Times Books (1980)
Language: English
Pages: 331
ePub: 1130 kb
Fb2: 1365 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: azw rtf docx lrf
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Words Language and Grammar

And how to use it effectively.

And how to use it effectively. Amazingly, almost all the material has aged well and is relevant today. Moreover, the wit and humanity of the author (not just a "writer"; sorry, Mr. Safire, have to disagree with you on this one) clearly shine through. 3 people found this helpful.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

com's William Safire Author Page. Customers Also Bought Items By. Stephen E. Ambrose.

In his witty way, Mr. Safire enlightens us concerning proper usage, correct pronunciation, the roots of our daily discourse,.

William Lewis Safir (December 17, 1929 – September 27, 2009), better known as William Safire (/ˈsæfaɪər/), was an American author, columnist, journalist, and presidential speechwriter

William Lewis Safir (December 17, 1929 – September 27, 2009), better known as William Safire (/ˈsæfaɪər/), was an American author, columnist, journalist, and presidential speechwriter.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by as on September 18, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

He advises us to make the choice of singular or plural depending on the meaning. For example, I would say ''antiques dealer'' because the alternative, ''antique dealer,'' could be confused with a very old and rickety dealer. in the Reagan Administration, she's my fiancee. ') The speech featured what speechwriters have come to call ''the Sorensen antithesis,'' after Ted (Ask Not) Sorensen. Said Carter: ''America did not invent human rights. Human rights invented America. With some daring - since President Carter has occasionally stumbled over the pronunciation of ''nuclear'' - the phrase ''nuclear conflagration'' was part of the speech.

Select Format: Hardcover. And how to use it effectively. Recently Viewed and Featured.

The former White House speech writer and incorrigibly waggish etymological bloodhound of The New York Times keeps the current state of the language on its toes with this collection of precision-tuned columns
Comments: (5)
Whitestone
At the end of 1979, the late William Safire wrote the "On Language" column for the New York Times Magazine. Proper word-usage ["who" vs. "whom" ... etc.] was his realm of expertise, and his column contained essential style information for his readers, who often submitted comments and corrections. Both the column and the reader-feedback were combined alphabetically into a rich dialogue in this book, copyrighted 1980 and published by AVON BOOKS in December 1981. I am reminded that major publications often have an official style-sheet; lengthy and detailed word- and punctuation-usage which will be adhered to in material they approve for publication. What a shame it may be to have your excellent story or essay or poem rejected because it contained erroneous usage of punctuations or words. This can happen. Even though Safire's "On Language" was copyrighted in 1980, its guidelines still apply, and this book should be a must-read for writers who wish to be published today.
Fearlessdweller
William Safire was a genius with telling us what the English language was all about. And how to use it effectively.
Duktilar
I've been a faithful reader of Bill Safire's column for years and so, when I saw this deeply discounted I could not resist.
Problem is, language changes and a work such as this accurate as it is, is just not very relevant and can't take modern usage into account. If you love language, better pay full price for a contemporary guide to usage. Bill was the best in his time. But that time is past.
Styphe
Yes, yes it is full of good advice, but it is also very funny, not just thanks to Safire himself but to his readers. The book is indeed published with the comments of the readers, and it make me think that most were so much polite and smarter than the readers of the New York Times today, who are rude and not well informed.
For instance, there is a note by Safire on the use of the terms home and house. One commentator writes;" Dear Bill, you referred to Polly Adler as a courtesan. Would she not more properly be referred to as a Madam? Or do you know something about Polly that I don't?"
This comes about because Mrs. Adler of dubious fame wrote a book of memoirs entitled "A House Is Not a Home" in the 50s.
The comments on jargon, and the various words used or disused by the government are just instructive and very funny.
LØV€ YØỮ
This is a compilation of On Language NYT columns from around 1980, by the late and much missed William Safire. Amazingly, almost all the material has aged well and is relevant today. Moreover, the wit and humanity of the author (not just a "writer"; sorry, Mr. Safire, have to disagree with you on this one) clearly shine through.