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eBook Interpretation of Prophecy download

by Partick Fairbaim

eBook Interpretation of Prophecy download ISBN: 0851516548
Author: Partick Fairbaim
Publisher: Banner of Truth; Second Edition edition (December 1, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 128
ePub: 1695 kb
Fb2: 1100 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf docx docx lit
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Encyclopedias and Subject Guides

Patrick Fairbairn (1805-1874) was born in Berwickshire, Scotland, studied at Edinburgh University, and was an outstanding scholar among Scottish Presbyterians

Patrick Fairbairn (1805-1874) was born in Berwickshire, Scotland, studied at Edinburgh University, and was an outstanding scholar among Scottish Presbyterians. After 27 years in pastoral service, he served three years as divinity professor at the Free Church College in Aberdeen before becoming principal of the Free Church College, Glasgow, for 18 years until his death. I enjoyed this book, I recall thinking how sad it is that such a work has been in our modern day, mostly forgotten. Fairbairns work is a jewel and is a great remedy for much light and shallow thought regarding how one ought to interpret the bible- especially how one views the interpretation of prophecy.

Patrick Fairbairn’s most popular book is The Interpretation of Prophecy. Books by Patrick Fairbairn. Showing 30 distinct works. The Interpretation of Prophecy by. Patrick Fairbairn.

Patrick Fairbairn, . University of Edinburgh, 1826) was a minister and theologian of the Free Church of Scotland. Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Patrick Fairbairn's books. Patrick Fairbairn’s Followers (3). in Greenlaw, Berwickshire, Scotland, The United Kingdom.

Prophecy: Viewed In Respect To Its Distinctive Nature, Special Function, And Proper . This was especially difficult for authors to decide before Israel was a nation again and before technology made literal interpretations possible

Prophecy: Viewed In Respect To Its Distinctive Nature, Special Function, And Proper Interpretation The Master's Seminary has 4 copies of this book, indicating substantial historical importance. This was especially difficult for authors to decide before Israel was a nation again and before technology made literal interpretations possible. This book is not light reading, but those with an interest in messanaic prophecy will find value.

1842: Stuart: Interpretation of Prophecy. the Word of the Lord stands forever). 1843: Lee: Dissertations on Eusebius. Date: 24 Apr 2009 Time: 15:03:53.

This volume is produced from digital images created through the University of Michigan University Library's large-scale digitization efforts. The Library seeks to preserve the intellectual content o. .items in a manner that facilitates and promotes a variety of uses.

Patrick Fairbairn, James Dodds. Prophecy Viewed in Respect to Its Distinctive Nature, Its Special Function, and Proper Interpretation. Exposition of the First Epistle of Peter: Considered in Reference to the Whole System of Divine Truth. Patrick Fairbairn, Wilhelm Steiger.

Fairbairn's work on typology was followed by Prophecy viewed in its Distinctive Nature, its Special Functions, and Proper Interpretation (1856) and Hermeneutical Manual; or, Introduction to the exegetical study of th.

Fairbairn's work on typology was followed by Prophecy viewed in its Distinctive Nature, its Special Functions, and Proper Interpretation (1856) and Hermeneutical Manual; or, Introduction to the exegetical study of the Scriptures of the New Testament (1858). Biographical Introduction". In Patrick Fairbairn (e. The Interpretation of Prophecy. The Banner of Truth Trust.

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Comments: (3)
Tygrafym
I enjoyed this book, I recall thinking how sad it is that such a work has been in our modern day, mostly forgotten. Fairbairns work is a jewel and is a great remedy for much light and shallow thought regarding how one ought to interpret the bible- especially how one views the interpretation of prophecy. Obviously this was Fairbairns intent in the work, simply by reading the title. I'd say he did his job well here and would encourage any who are willing to take the time to wade through this book. It can be a bit pricey, so, if desired you can find it for free online at [...], or at google books: [...].

Fairbairn first seeks to biblically define terms, such as what a prophet is, what their work and callings were, how divine revelation was given, what purpose did the prophets fill in the Old Testament, etc. He uses many scriptural examples and illustrations to display his point and does alot of exegesis on harder biblical texts. I've noticed that Fairbairn is one of the gifted teachers that God has given to His church to help with some of the more difficult portions of scripture. I recall Spurgeon commenting on Fairbairns commentary on Ezekiel saying how his work is the best there is on that book. (I'd agree also)

Lastly, this book is not light reading, I don't think any of Patrick Fairbairn's works are, however, I believe all of them are well worth their time reading. For myself, this book has actually made me a better reader due to it's difficulty.

UPDATE - 09/28/2013

I am re-reading the 2nd section of this book where Fairbairn exegetes and guides the reader through Daniel and the Revelation. I find his exegesis reasonable, sound, and fascinating. He sees Nebuchadnezzar's vision in Dan 2 as the external or political viewpoint (suitable to Nebuchadnezzar's person/position) concerning the future all the way up until the end of the world when Christ's Kingdom will have filled the whole earth. Daniel's vision in chapter 7 is the internal viewpoint of what God thinks, and the spiritual man thinks concerning the secular kingdoms (they are described as beasts) whereas Nebuchadnezzar upon his conversion is referred to has a man. Fairbairn then goes on to show how Daniel and Revelation are two descriptions of the same thing, the progress of Christ's kingdom in the world and it's ultimate victory. I admire his exegesis so much and find myself to be greatly delighted in seeing the truth of scripture in a clearer light especially the more difficult sections of scripture like the Revelation. I do still recommend this work, this is my 2nd read through this book and I just find it so meaty and insightful. I am looking forward someday to reading through his work on Typology.
Ber
I enjoyed this book, I recall thinking how sad it is that such a work has been in our modern day, mostly forgotten. Fairbairns work is a jewel and is a great remedy for much light and shallow thought regarding how one ought to interpret the bible- especially how one views the interpretation of prophecy. Obviously this was Fairbairns intent in the work, simply by reading the title. I'd say he did his job well here and would encourage any who are willing to take the time to wade through this book. It can be a bit pricey, so, if desired you can find it for free online at [...], or at google books: [...].

Fairbairn first seeks to biblically define terms, such as what a prophet is, what their work and callings were, how divine revelation was given, what purpose did the prophets fill in the Old Testament, etc. He uses many scriptural examples and illustrations to display his point and does alot of exegesis on harder biblical texts. I've noticed that Fairbairn is one of the gifted teachers that God has given to His church to help with some of the more difficult portions of scripture. I recall Spurgeon commenting on Fairbairns commentary on Ezekiel saying how his work is the best there is on that book. (I'd agree also)

Lastly, this book is not light reading, I don't think any of Patrick Fairbairn's works are, however, I believe all of them are well worth their time reading. For myself, this book has actually made me a better reader due to it's difficulty.

UPDATE - 09/28/2013

I am re-reading the 2nd section of this book where Fairbairn exegetes and guides the reader through Daniel and the Revelation. I find his exegesis reasonable, sound, and fascinating. He sees Nebuchadnezzar's vision in Dan 2 as the external or political viewpoint (suitable to Nebuchadnezzar's person/position) concerning the future all the way up until the end of the world when Christ's Kingdom will have filled the whole earth. Daniel's vision in chapter 7 is the internal viewpoint of what God thinks, and the spiritual man thinks concerning the secular kingdoms (they are described as beasts) whereas Nebuchadnezzar upon his conversion is referred to has a man. Fairbairn then goes on to show how Daniel and Revelation are two descriptions of the same thing, the progress of Christ's kingdom in the world and it's ultimate victory. I admire his exegesis so much and find myself to be greatly delighted in seeing the truth of scripture in a clearer light especially the more difficult sections of scripture like the Revelation. I do still recommend this work, this is my 2nd read through this book and I just find it so meaty and insightful. I am looking forward someday to reading through his work on Typology.