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eBook The Great Encyclopedia of Nineteenth-Century Major League Baseball download

by David Nemec

eBook The Great Encyclopedia of Nineteenth-Century Major League Baseball download ISBN: 0817314997
Author: David Nemec
Publisher: University Alabama Press; 2nd edition (June 4, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 1056
ePub: 1846 kb
Fb2: 1982 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mbr lit txt rtf
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Encyclopedias and Subject Guides

At last an encyclopedia on 19th century baseball David Nemec's work is an absolute masterpiece.

At last an encyclopedia on 19th century baseball. Building on his own obsessive interest in baseball and on the work of other baseball fanatics, David Nemec has succeeded in creating an encyclopedia of major league baseball as it existed in 1900, the dawn of the modern age of the game. David Nemec's work is an absolute masterpiece. Not only have you the complete stats from 19th Century Major League Baseball, but in addition, a world of amazing, colorful and interesting short stories about owners, players and franchises.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Great Encyclopedia of Nineteenth Century. Baseball historian David Nemec presents complete team rosters and detailed player, manager, and umpire information, with a wealth of statistics to warm a fan's heart. The Great Encyclopedia of Nineteenth Century Major League Baseball. Sidebars cover a variety of topics, from oddities-the team that had the best record but finished second-to analyses of why Cleveland didn't win any pennants in the 1890s.

Baseball historian David Nemec presents complete team rosters and detailed player, manager, and umpire .

Baseball historian David Nemec presents complete team rosters and detailed player, manager, and umpire information, with a wealth of statistics to warm a fan’s heart. Sidebars cover a variety of topics, from oddities-the team that had the best record but finished second-to analyses of why Cleveland didn’t win any pennants in the 1890s. This comprehensive reference work covers the early years of major league baseball from the first game-May 4, 1871, a 2-0 victory for the Fort Wayne Kekiongas over the visiting Cleveland Forest City team-through the 1900 season.

David Nemec began the lifetime labor that helped produced this work in 1954 and . An astonishing labor of love.

David Nemec began the lifetime labor that helped produced this work in 1954 and admits it may never end, as there always will be some obscure player whose birth date has not yet been found. Until perfection is achieved, this work offers state-of-the-art accuracy and detail beyond that supplied by even modern baseball encyclopedias. As Casey Stengel, who was born during this era, was wont to say, you could look it up. Now you ca. .The Great Encyclopedia of Nineteenth-Century Major League Baseball. I read this book from cover to cover, statistical tables and all, because I'd enjoyed Nemec's other work.

Baseball historian David Nemec presents complete team rosters and detailed player, manager, and umpire information, with a wealth of statistics to warm a fan’s heart

Baseball historian David Nemec presents complete team rosters and detailed player, manager, and umpire information, with a wealth of statistics to warm a fan’s heart. Nemec also carefully charts the rule changes from year to year as the game developed by fits and starts to formulate the modern rules

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David Nemec is the author of The Great Encyclopedia of Nineteenth Century Major League Baseball, The Beer and Whisky League, 20th Century . Nemec has won numerous SABR national baseball trivia contests.

David Nemec is the author of The Great Encyclopedia of Nineteenth Century Major League Baseball, The Beer and Whisky League, 20th Century Baseball Chronicles, Early Dreams, Major League Baseball Profiles: 1871-1900 and many other works on baseball. He currently lives in Laguna Woods, California.

David Nemec (born December 10, 1938) is an American baseball historian, novelist and playwright. In 1997, Donald I. Fine Books published Nemec’s The Great Encyclopedia of Nineteenth Century Major League Baseball. The book was updated and expanded and reissued in 2006 by the University of Alabama.

Why baseball emerged as a popular sport in US cities, and not in the . 2nd ed. (University of Alabama Press, 2006).

Why baseball emerged as a popular sport in US cities, and not in the pastures of rural America. Why Alexander Cartwright and NOT Abner Doubleday is the the true "father of baseball. How as many as 50 African Americans played major league baseball in the 1870s and 1880s before the surging racism of the day led owners to purge black players and segregate baseball. And why Moses Fleetwood Walker was the first African American to play major league baseball, 60 years before Jackie Robinson re-integrated baseball.

The authoritative compendium of facts, statistics, photographs, and analysis that defines baseball in its formative first decades.

The authoritative compendium of facts, statistics, photographs, and analysis that defines baseball in its formative first decades. This comprehensive reference work covers the early years of major league baseball from the first game—May 4, 1871, a 2-0 victory for the Fort Wayne Kekiongas over the visiting Cleveland Forest City team—through the 1900 season. Baseball historian David Nemec presents complete team rosters and detailed player, manager, and umpire information, with a wealth of statistics to warm a fan’s heart. Sidebars cover a variety of topics, from oddities—the team that had the best record but finished second—to analyses of why Cleveland didn’t win any pennants in the 1890s. Additional benefits include dozens of rare illustrations and narrative accounts of each year’s pennant race. Nemec also carefully charts the rule changes from year to year as the game developed by fits and starts to formulate the modern rules. The result is an essential work of reference and at the same time a treasury of baseball history. This new edition adds much material unearthed since the first edition, fills gaps, and corrects errors, while presenting a number of new stories and fascinating details. David Nemec began the lifetime labor that helped produced this work in 1954 and admits it may never end, as there always will be some obscure player whose birth date has not yet been found. Until perfection is achieved, this work offers state-of-the-art accuracy and detail beyond that supplied by even modern baseball encyclopedias. As Casey Stengel, who was born during this era, was wont to say, “you could look it up.”  Now you can. 
Comments: (3)
Yahm
This is an incredible book for any baseball fanatic. At last an encyclopedia on 19th century baseball. Building on his own obsessive interest in baseball and on the work of other baseball fanatics, David Nemec has succeeded in creating an encyclopedia of major league baseball as it existed in 1900, the dawn of the modern age of the game.

Not only is this book a feast for those who pour over baseball statistics, the narrative is quite good, too. One can watch the rules of the game evolving as the 19th century rolls by. At last I understand William Hulbert role in establishing one of the first major league and how such a league could survive without teams in Philadelphia and New York. There are also many sidebars memorializing some of the characters of the game.

Although not an inexpensive book, it is a good value for the money. It's a University of Alabama Press product, large size and good quality paper. The book also contains an extensive bibliography for further reading. It's the perfect gift for any baseball fan.
Iraraeal
If you're the type of baseball fan who owns a baseball encyclopedia, you might think: "I don't need this book, I already got the stats from those years".

Guess again.

David Nemec's work is an absolute masterpiece. Not only have you the complete stats from 19th Century Major League Baseball, but in addition, a world of amazing, colorful and interesting short stories about owners, players and franchises. Each and every season has his own resume, so you can truly feel the aroma of that particular season.

That book had me glued to it for some time...
Global Progression
This is the definitive work on the subject but not without flaws. The section on the NAPBBP contains several errors and oversights. He implies the Washington Nationals did not attend the St. Patrick's Day meeting and that Kekionga and Rockford Forest City did. Kekionga definitely did not and the best evidence indicates that Chadwick's inclusion of Rockford Forest City is erroneous and that they were actually represented by Harry Wright as proxy.

The section on the first game is a disaster. It is difficult for me to believe that Nemec actually compiled this himself. Five of the Kekionga players are listed at the wrong positions in his box score recreation. I can't even guess how that happened. It also does not balance, presumably because he added the bottom of the ninth which was left out of many accounts and forgot to update the defensive stats to account for all 27 Kekionga outs. The edited play by play also contains errors some because his source was incomplete and at least one because of a misinterpretation. For example, Sutton is noted as out rounding first when in fact he was out after failing to safely return to first after a foul ball, an obvious rule difference between now and then. Frank Selliman was playing under the name Frank Williams and was listed as such in every known contemporary account of the game.
He fails to note where the first game was played, probably because he was not sure because of all the conflicting accounts. At least he does not spread the Hamilton Field myth propagated by virtually every other book on 19th century base ball. Perhaps the most humorous gaffe is the note that nine teams playing each other five times would potentially require 45 games. That would require each team to play itself five times

This is a reference book, not one that anyone would consider reading from cover to cover, but there are plenty of interesting anecdotes included that amplify the statistics. Despite the above-mentioned errors, I still give this four stars and rate it as an invaluable reference, but it does not compare with his Official Rules of Baseball Illustrated which in my opinion is the best baseball book ever written.