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eBook Caring for Your Own Dead download

by Lisa Carlson

eBook Caring for Your Own Dead download ISBN: 0942679016
Author: Lisa Carlson
Publisher: Upper Access Book Pub; 1st edition (July 1987)
Language: English
ePub: 1296 kb
Fb2: 1240 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mbr doc docx rtf
Category: Reference

Carlson, executive director of the Funeral and Memorial Societies of. .

Carlson, executive director of the Funeral and Memorial Societies of America, has compiled an information-packed guide "for those making funeral arrangements with or without a funeral doctor. The book begins with a series of anecdotes that illustrates the experiences of those who have approached end-of-life arrangements in nontraditional ways. The most complete guide to DIY's can be found in Lisa Carlson's Caring for the Dead. God Bless Lisa Carlson for having this vision.

In "Caring for the Dead," Lisa Carlson provides both an informative guide to DIY funerals and cremations, as well as a searing .

In "Caring for the Dead," Lisa Carlson provides both an informative guide to DIY funerals and cremations, as well as a searing exposé of the funeral and cemetery industries

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We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. I know we could charge money, but then we couldn’t achieve our mission: a free online library for everyone. This is our day. Today.

When Lisa Carlson’s Caring for Your Own Dead was published the next year, he felt that disseminating it through .

When Lisa Carlson’s Caring for Your Own Dead was published the next year, he felt that disseminating it through the societies was a matter of importance. It was on his urging that Carlson became involved in the society movement. Karen Leonard-seduced into casket sales for the fun of it-soon found herself the director of the Redwood Funeral Society in Northern California. Taking a page from the funeral industry’s own indispensable Grief Therapy mantra, she perceived the therapeutic benefits of caring for one’s own dead.

And relatively few books have been written to prepare those of us who remain for the challenging work of caring for our deceased loved ones

And relatively few books have been written to prepare those of us who remain for the challenging work of caring for our deceased loved ones. Joining host Peter Bermudes is Lisa Carlson, the author of four such books-including most recently Final Rights: Reclaiming the American Way of Death. She is also the founder and executive director of the Funeral Ethics Organization. This video was created in coordination with Arlington Community Media, Inc. in Arlington, MA.

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In "Caring for the Dead," Lisa Carlson provides both an informative guide to DIY funerals and cremations, as.This is the update version of her original Caring For Your Own Dead and what I said about that book applies here.

In "Caring for the Dead," Lisa Carlson provides both an informative guide to DIY funerals and cremations, as well as a searing exposé of the funeral and cemetery industries. Lost count of the number of copies of this book I have bought, but I love giving it as a gift, and have used it myself actually when helping friends build plain pine burial boxes and oak burial boxes for loved ones. It is a subject that needs to be discussed more, since so many people assume that ONLY a funeral home that.

A good book on the subject is "Caring for the Dead" by Lisa Carlson.

The moment Lisa Carlson pulled open the door of the pickup truck one March night in 1981, she knew her husband was dead. Back then, she was Lisa Brackett, wife of John Brackett, a schoolteacher, and mother of two young children. That night she became the widow of a suicide. Lessening the Mystery. 'Lisa wrote the book,'' Mr. Carlson said. 'I wrote two chapters, but mostly, I tried to do what Lisa didn't have time to do.

In most states you don't need a funeral director. In every state you can take charge of funeral arrangements and body disposition. Caring for your own dead can be the most meaningful way to say goodbye to someone you love. It may save your money. Natural childbirth and hospice, once considered revolutionary ideas, have allowed millions to take control of critical life events. This landmark book tells you how to involve yourself in another of life's most intimate experiences - the final act of love for a friend or relative who has died.
Comments: (5)
Qiahmagha
great book came fast and in great condition. must have reading for those who want to avoid the funeral industry
Jieylau
very helpful
Huston
My husband really enjoyed this book and has learned a lot about this subject. I don't know what else to say. thanks
Ballalune
One thing that has irritated me; if one is in hospital, and perishes, the first phone call is to a local funeral home. It is, in my opinion, not only in bad taste, it is rather wasteful to spend $8,000 on a $20.00 pine box, it is not as if the dead will be aware of it, and it is so wrong to shove that sort of thinking onto the family, especially those who have just been informed, "Your loved one is dead, that will be %8,000 or more to arrange a tasteful memorial."

Lisa gets it right: And I can remember when my grandfather was buried in the local church yard. Family took care of it.

The better thing, in my view, is to realize that no one gets out of this world alive, if possible, arrange for a Pre-paid cremation and take care of the other details while one is still capable of thinking. What I would add: Skip the published obituaries in the local newspapers, those are a relic that need to be retired, but if one must, at least, have a guard at the home on the day of the service.
Wat!?
I once tried to give my body to science. Do you know how hard that is? It is more difficult than getting rid of a broken refrigerator. The closer you are to actually being able to go through with the deal, the harder it gets, too.

Lisa Carlson underestimates the amount of fuss that busybody social workers can cause for people who are getting ready to die, but otherwise "Caring for Your Own Dead" is a thorough explanation of what you have to do to bypass the undertaker.

The motives for doing so seem to be equal parts New England thriftiness and a belief that laying out your loved ones yourself helps the "grieving process."

It is pleasant to report that in Hawaii, unlike some other states, the government doesn't regulate disposal of corpses very much. Burial in private ground requires approval of the County Council, but when I asked the county land use director about it, he said that in 1989 (when this review was first published) nobody had asked for at least 10 years.

Though it may seem incongruous, Americans typically are both squeamish about death and avid for morbid details -- which, because of the squeamishness, tend to be inaccurate. When I was at college, it was a matter of common, although incorrect, knowledge that you could get $250 by selling your body to the medical school, which would tattoo the bottom of your foot to ensure collecting when the time came.

Except for marriage, it is hard to think of any subject upon which more good advice has been ignored than death rituals. Herodotus observed a long time ago (at the end of Book One of the "Histories") that the men who ate the bodies of their fathers would have been shocked by the Greek practice of cremation. Caring for your own dead the Carlson way should usually be cheaper. Whether it is more satisfying depends.

One piece of advice is clearly wrong. She says you can either write or phone in to your newspaper the information about the obituary. If you want it to appear correctly in print, don't phone it in.

2007 update: In the 18 years since I wrote this review, the prank of planting fake obits in newspapers has become so common that most papers no longer accept obits from (alleged) survivors. Most now require that the information come from an undertaker or, if none is used, that a copy of a legal death certificate be provided. As a practical matter, it usually takes too long to get a certificate.