carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Igniting the Reaches

eBook Igniting the Reaches download

by David Drake

eBook Igniting the Reaches download ISBN: 0441000266
Author: David Drake
Publisher: Ace; 1st edition (April 1, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1498 kb
Fb2: 1932 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: doc lrf txt azw
Category: Pseudoscience
Subcategory: Science Fiction

3 primary works, 4 total works. Book 1. Igniting the Reaches.

3 primary works, 4 total works. Thousands of years after the collapse of the hum. ore. Shelve Igniting the Reaches.

Igniting the Reaches book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Igniting the Reaches (1994) is the SF first novel in the Privateer series. In the far future, humans have spread throughout a great volume of space. But then came the Collapse and mankind lost contact with the farthest worlds. Now mankind is beginning a new age of expansion into the galaxy, re-discovering lost worlds, races and treasures. In this novel, the Venusian settlers have funded a voyage of trade and exploration

Igniting the Reaches. To Rana Van Name Who first heard about this one when we were all going off to dinner; And who is special.

Igniting the Reaches. Piet Ricimer stood out like an open flame on the crowded, cluttered bridge of theSultan as she orbited Salute. Stephen Gregg was amused by the young officer's flashy dress. Well, Ricimer was no younger than Gregg himselfтАФbut Gregg, as a member of a factorial family, was. mature in ways that no sailor would ever be. More sophisticated, at any rate

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Man Who Folded Himself. David Drake was born on September 24, 1945, in Dubuque, Iowa. He attended University of Iowa, where he graduated with a degree in History (with honors) and Latin. He then attended Duke Law School. He was drafted out of law school, served in the army for two years and then returned to school. He worked as an Assistant Town Attorney of Chapel Hill and then part-time as a city bus driver before he became a full-time writer. Drake is considered a master of Science Fiction and Fantasy. The Hammer's Slammers, military science fiction, was his first published series. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. t on November 23, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Used availability for David Drake's Igniting the Reaches. April 1994 : USA Hardback.

From the author of the Northworld series comes a remarkable world where renegade pirates race to the farthest reaches of space to seek their fortunes by trading with star colonies. A journey of incalculable odds and unpredictable danger as all seek the countless wealth to be earned in the Reaches.

Millennia after the collapse of human civilization, humankind battles to rebuild an interstellar empire, and Stephen Gregg and Piet Ricimer leave the Free State of Venus to seek their fortune amid the perilous opportunities along the new exploration frontier.
Comments: (6)
Pipet
This is a future-age retelling of some of the adventures of Sir Francis Drake, with some of the experiences of Hawkins thrown in. One engagement, partway through the book, in which Captain Ricimer and party barely escape with their lives, is based on the engagement at San Juan de Ulua in September of 1568, in which the carrack Jesus of Lubeck was captured by the Spaniards, and Hawkins, in a smaller and handier ship, barely got away. There are equivalents to the Spanish (the North American government) trying to dominate all the worlds, Portugal (the Southern Cross confederation, which was granted some of the planets, by the equivalent of the Vatican), the New World (the interstellar worlds all claimed by Pleyal (the equivalent of King Philip), the leader of North America, and his Southern Cross allies), enslaved Blacks (the alien Molts), the Native Americans (the Rabbits, regressed humans from lost colonies in the interstellar reaches), and the Pacific (the Mirror universe, reachable only through certain hazardous routes). When I first read these, I wondered if we might see (for example) Martian colonists fighting a revolution against the North Americans, and taking up the role here of the Dutch separatists (but I was disappointed there). Author Drake, a Vietnam veteran, spends some time mentioning the psychological toll the action and killing takes on the men. (Different men seem to handle it in different ways, some becoming desensitized to a dangerous level, while others are visited by the ghosts of their victims when they try to get some sleep in their rack at night. There was no term yet for PTSD in Sir Francis Drake's time, but even then, I imagine that fellow warriors appreciated there were incidents their friend, just returned from the wars, did not wish to discuss. I would think in the future, there would be some provision to care for psychological casualties, but perhaps counseling was one of those things which became less popular when the previous human civilization collapsed?) While the story is derivative, it still remains interesting. (Of course, your mileage may vary -- I'm an SCA member and interested in the exploits of the English Sea Dogs, the Dutch War of Independence, the Spanish Armada, etc.) By the way, for the Spanish Armada (or its equivalent in this series), check the next book in the series, "Fireships".
Slowly writer
I read the second and third books in this series first and just got around to this one. It's a great opening to a wonderful trilogy.
Super P
Igniting the Reaches (1994) is the SF first novel in the Privateer series. In the far future, humans have spread throughout a great volume of space. But then came the Collapse and mankind lost contact with the farthest worlds. Now mankind is beginning a new age of expansion into the galaxy, re-discovering lost worlds, races and treasures. The Feds and Southerns are becoming rich from new colonies and trading posts among the stars and other nations have sent out trading ships to gain some of these riches.

In this novel, the Venusian settlers have funded a voyage of trade and exploration. The Sultan is a privately armed ship commanded by Captain Choransky. The flotilla also includes the Preakness and the Dove. Stephen Gregg is aboard the Sultan as supercargo, representing his uncle, Gregg of Weyston. Their first port-of-call is Salute ... at least, they think it is Salute.

Piet Recimer, an officer and former shipowner, takes down a crew in the cutter to investigate and finds two Southern Cross ships on the ground, so the flotilla is brought down near the spaceport. Trucks are offloaded from the ships, filled with armed men, and rushed down to the port. There they find that everybody has run away, except for one man who apparently slept through the evacuation.

Loading 98 Molts, an alien race that moved into human space after the collapse, on their ships, the Venusians take off for Virginia (or somewhere near it) to sell their cargo. There they run into a bit of shooting with the North American Federation colony.

This novel is based on the voyages of Francis Drake (and some of his contemporaries). It has the same emphasis on God and Country, the same makeshift technology of shipbuilding, navigation and weaponry, and the same ignorance and cruelty found in the originals. It also reflects the casual attitudes of the Elizabethan era toward slavery. Some of the parallels are rather strained, but the focus of the story is the men themselves, bringing to life the excitement and confusion that resulted from mankind expanding into a mostly unknown frontier.

Recommended for Drake fans and anyone else who enjoys tales of long voyages to strange lands.

-Arthur W. Jordin
LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
This is the second book in the Reaches series. This book deals with Piet Ricimer and Stephen Gregg's supposed mission to the asteroid belt that really is a pirate raid through the breach. The breach is a dangerous passage through the Mirror, a block between our universe and another. The other side holds the treasures of the defunct empire, automated factories churning out the chips that hold civilization together. Gentlemen and aristocracy are the linchpins of the society on Venus. Stagnate and intolerant they fund Ricimer and Gregg as privateers to bring home the riches (chips) so they can hold off the North American Federations attempts to pull them back under control.

Ricimer is venerated and protected by the hulking Gregg. Gregg a disposed minor noble is physically and mentally imposing and capable of any act of violence to protect his leader. Gregg is also plagued with doubt about his acts of violence. Jeremy Moore is a dilettante with cyber abilities who discovers to his dismay that he can be a cold blooded killer. The anguish the characters suffer in probing their psyches is well written and seems quite real. Willing to do anything for the cause, right or wrong, but questioning one's soul in the process provides a realistic look at both leaders and followers. A good book as a stand alone but I recommend you read "Igniting the Reaches" before reading this and "Fireships" after you read this. It isn't a monumental trilogy but it is still well worth reading.