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by Jack Vance

eBook Ecce and Old Earth (Cadwal Chronicles, Book 2) download ISBN: 0312851324
Author: Jack Vance
Publisher: Tor Books; 1st trade ed edition (September 1, 1991)
Language: English
Pages: 436
ePub: 1828 kb
Fb2: 1258 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: azw lrf lrf docx
Category: Pseudoscience
Subcategory: Science Fiction

Ecce and Old Earth", sequel to the thunderous "Araminta Station", is actually more like two novels screwed together than .

Ecce and Old Earth", sequel to the thunderous "Araminta Station", is actually more like two novels screwed together than a single work. The first hundred pages take us back to Cadwal, where we last saw Glawen Clattuc battling Kirdy in the waves of Deucas. Now he has the last letter from Floreste, which tells him where his father is being held. absolutely amazing! I almost feel a separation anxiety: "parting with such sweet sorrow," when I read his stories because I know they're going to end.

Ecce and Old Earth book. The Cadwal Chronicles is less science fiction and fantasy than many of Mr. Vance's other works and more a mystery wrapped in a sociological exploration. The planet Cadwal has an ecosystem unique in the human-explored.

The Cadwall Chronicles. Throy, to the south of Deucas and about equal in area to Ecce, extended from the polar ice well into the South Temperate Zone. The terrain of Throy was the most dramatic of Cadwal. Crags leaned over chasms; dark forests roared in the wind.

Ecce and Old Earth is volume two of the Cadwal Chronicles trilogy, by SF Grandmaster Jack Vance. Glawen Clattuc takes a desperate chance to free his kidnapped father from a prison camp on the viciously primitive continent named Ecce.

Ecce and Old Earth is a 1991 science fiction novel by American writer Jack Vance, the second novel in the Cadwal Chronicles trilogy, set in Vance's Gaean Reach. It follows Araminta Station and precedes Throy. Glawen Clattuc has learned that his father, Scharde, is being held prisoner by an old enemy, Smonny Clattuc. Scharde and others who have earned Smonny's wrath are trapped on the unsettled continent of Ecce, which is teeming with very dangerous animals

The Cadwal Chronicles . Vance Jack - Ecce and Old Earth - скачать книгу. шрифт: 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 32.

The Cadwal Chronicles /. Vance . книга Ecce and Old Earth. On Cadwal the Naturalists of Stroma took no official notice of the event, though now the sole income of Stroma was the yield from private off-world investment. The Charter remained as always the basic law of Cadwal and Araminta Station continued its work as usual. Persons of note, resident at arminta station, stroma and elsewhere. Times New Roman Georgia Courier New Serif Arial Tahoma Helvetica Menlo Consolas monospace Monaco.

Manufacturer: Tor Books Release date: 1 September 1991 ISBN-10 : 0312851324 ISBN-13: 9780312851323.

Jack Vance (1916 - ) Jack Vance was born in 1916 and studied mining, engineering and journalism at the University .

Jack Vance (1916 - ) Jack Vance was born in 1916 and studied mining, engineering and journalism at the University of California. During the Second World War he served in the merchant navy and was torpedoed twice. He started contributing stories to the pulp magazines in the mid 1940s and published his first book, The Dying Earth, in 1950. Among his many books are The Dragon Masters, for which he won his first Hugo Award, Big Planet, The Anome, and the Lyonesse sequence.

Throy concludes the Cadwal Chronicles, which began with Araminta Station and continued in Ecce and Old Earth. From Publishers Weekly. Continuing his tales of Cadwal, governed for generations by the Conservancy, which is dedicated to preserving the planet's natural beauty, Vance posits a scenario in which the Conservancy is now rent by factional conflict between the radical Life, Peace and Freedom Party and the conservative Chartists. Glawen Clattuc, scion of one of the scientific houses of Cadwal, must discover which humans are sabotaging his planet, protected by law and covenant against colonization and exploitation.

The human Conservators on the planet Cadwal, a natural preserve, face a conspiracy of human and aliens to wrest away control of their world and exploit its resources
Comments: (7)
Undeyn
The magical storytelling of Jack Vance continues unabated in this second book in "The Cadwal Chronicles Trilogy"...absolutely amazing! I almost feel a separation anxiety: "parting with such sweet sorrow," when I read his stories because I know they're going to end. He allows his readers to become an integral part of the story which is a truly amazing experience that I find exhilarating and unique to Jack Vance. The characters and worlds are exquisitely drawn and become part of your life by invading your everyday thoughts and nightly dreams. What a wonderful journey...
Thundershaper
The story is actually a very restrained account of a pursuit of lost documents, with one violent confrontation close to the end. The writing makes the whole book sing.
Xor
Vance's stories are incredible. Descriptions are unmatched. The characters come alive. His imagination creates a view of the future which is plausible and fantastic at the same time.
Mpapa
Jack Vance
A Master story teller
Lahorns Gods
A near new item at a bargain price. Excellent quality and fast shipping. I am very happy about this purchase.
Folsa
I've always been a Jack Vance fan sice I was a teenager. His mannered SF novels such as this one, even seem like a Jane Austen type of understated language which gets to the heart of the human condition even though it may be set on a world far removed from the English counties of Austen. I had volume one of the Cadwell Chronicles, which I read long ago. As he had died, I thought there were no more. Even though this one is not exactly up to his work in volume 1, it is still great. Thank you to the publisher for reissuing it.
RMS
Bodwyn
This is the middle book of a trilogy by renowned master Jack Vance.

A reader will never go wrong picking up a Vance book, if only for the sheer delight of his exquisite use of language, both in expansive diction and crafty composition.

The Cadwal Chronicles is less science fiction and fantasy than many of Mr. Vance's other works and more a mystery wrapped in a sociological exploration.

As with most of Mr. Vance's writings, he builds his worlds and cosmos with precision and detail. His books are not recommended for the reader who does not have the patience who can handle random divergences of intricate construction that may only be tangentially related to the main story.

However, even given these digressions, Mr. Vance's masterful command of words makes the reading worth the investment of time. His characters are clever, his dialog filled with wit and delight and his landscapes and backgrounds meticulously and seamlessly built.

Ecce and Old Earth follows the massive first book in the series, Araminta Station, wherein the main drama is established: a world designated as a conservancy, with minimal intrusion by humanity, faces an oppressive and, eventually, violent attempt to transform it into a full colonized world.

As with any Jack Vance tale, the build-up is extremely nuanced, with the main character, Glawen Clattuc, being developed throughout the first book, from teen to early adulthood. About midway through the first book, his eventual love interest is introduced, Wayness Tamms.

The first book leaves several compelling cliffhangers, which begin to be resolved in Book Two. Ecce and Old Earth reads like a play in three acts: first there is Glawen, resolving the significant cliffhanger from Book One; then there is Wayness, attempting to uncover the mystery surrounding the "Charter", the grant that would protect Cadwal from colonization; finally, there is the meeting of all the dramatis personnae in the apparent conclusion of the tale.

Indeed, it would seem at the end of Ecce and Old Earth, there isn't really a need for a third book. Forrtunately, Jack Vance is more a master than we think and the third book uncovers further complexity in the Cadwal conservancy.

Ecce and Old Earth has a considerable amount of planet-hopping, giving free rein to Mr. Vance's strengths in designing and describing unique worlds and species. Like any good detective novel, he wraps each character within their own adventure, all the while letting the reader see the intertwining of their "separate" tales.

There's classic Jack Vance crisp and clever dialog along with adventure, danger, a smattering of romance and, as always, moments of sheer laugh out loud delight.

While not as startling or momentous as some of Mr. Vance's most notable (and awarded) stories, the Cadwal Chronicales, are a satisfying read.
The magical storytelling of Jack Vance continues unabated in this second book in "The Cadwal Chronicles Trilogy"...absolutely amazing! I almost feel a separation anxiety: "parting with such sweet sorrow," when I read his stories because I know they're going to end. He allows his readers to become an integral part of the story which is a truly amazing experience that I find exhilarating and unique to Jack Vance. The characters and worlds are exquisitely drawn and become part of your life by invading your everyday thoughts and nightly dreams. What a wonderful journey...