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eBook Eternal Light download

by Paul J. McAuley

eBook Eternal Light download ISBN: 0380972271
Author: Paul J. McAuley
Publisher: Avon Books (September 1993)
Language: English
ePub: 1306 kb
Fb2: 1991 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mbr azw docx mobi
Category: Pseudoscience
Subcategory: Science Fiction

Ships from and sold by Books Mela. Criminally out of print, this was the book that catapulted McAuley into the science fiction spotlight, I believe this was preceded by two books (making this the third of a trilogy) that were entertaining but mediocre genre SF and indeed there are several references to events that I can only assume happened in previous books but you really don't notice.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Sinister alliances, a mad cyborg, a rich immortal, the Navy, secret and ancient knowledge, and a race to a black hole all complicate Dorothy Yoshida's life after an encounter with an alien life-form.

And the planetoid was in orbit around a massive red supergiant star about five light days from the black hole at the centre of the Galaxy, deep within the ragged oval of its accretion disc.

And the planetoid was in orbit around a massive red supergiant star about five light days from the black hole at the centre of the Galaxy, deep within the ragged oval of its accretion disc vast arc of gas swept across the sky; a braided river of glowing filaments and streamers spiralling around magnetic field lines, so vast that the Solar System would have been no more than a leaf whirled away in its torrential energies, it curved in towards the black hole and extended far through the shell of gas clouds which surrounded the accretion.

The right of Paul ]. McAuley to be identified as the author. I am from God and shall return to God! Dear, merciful God will give me a little light. to light my way to everlasting bliss! Primeval Light. from The boy’s magic horn). of this work has been asserted by him in accordance with. In the realm of light there is no time. PROLOGUE – Primeval Light.

Paul McAuley at Worldcon 2005 in Glasgow. Asimov's Science Fiction. 37 (4&5): 183–191. Paul J. McAuley (born 23 April 1955) is a British botanist and science fiction author. A biologist by training, McAuley writes mostly hard science fiction. Red Dust, set on a far-future Mars colonized by the Chinese, is a planetary romance featuring many emerging technologies and SF motifs: nanotechnology, biotechnology, artificial intelligence, personality downloads, virtual reality.

I asked myself this when I found out what year Paul McAuley's Eternal Light was published. I had assumed it was from the 1970s. This was entirely because it's part of the Gollancz Space Opera collection, those of the sexy monochromatic covers, and all the other works in the collection that I'd read were written in the early ’70s.

Prologue: primeval light

Prologue: primeval light. Or it began long after one Alea family had slaughtered most of the others and forced the rest to flee the core, when a binary star came too close to the black hole at the dead center of the Galaxy.

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Comments: (4)
Gholbimand
compared to Iain M Banks this is quite light on. Rambles on a bit with a fluffy ending.. not something I would read again.
Hap
Criminally out of print, this was the book that catapulted McAuley into the science fiction spotlight, I believe this was preceded by two books (making this the third of a trilogy) that were entertaining but mediocre genre SF and indeed there are several references to events that I can only assume happened in previous books but you really don't notice. Just start reading and dive in. Attempting to describe the plot is probably pointless because there are so many threads and details, needless to say it deals with the center of the galaxy and god-like intelligences and the people who want to use that sort of stuff for their own benefits. And science. Lots of it. These people all do weird things that seem to defy science and McAuley has no problem making it all seem probable. Heck his science seems to make sense so I guess he knows what he's talking about. Go figure. Basically you just let yourself get carried along, the characters are fairly memorable (if a tad flat at points) and frankly he drags out the ending just a little bit, the book should have ended about fifty pages before it actually does but he needs to wrap it up somehow I guess. Alas, it's close to the peaks already set by hypercomplicated science freaks Dan Simmons (read Hyperion! Now!) and Peter Hamilton but their books hang together a little better and don't depend as much on the visceral rush of reading the book. Nevertheless this was a major leap for McAuley and one of the best SF books of the decade easily. You won't be sorry for tracking this one down.
ℓo√ﻉ
Okay, so, I used to be kinda leery of the way the recommendation software seems like it's trying hard to be your friend...I was like, hey, I'll find my own way around, thanks. But then, in a moment of weakness, I followed the link to Paul McAuley's "Eternal Light" when it was recommended to me after I had looked up some other space-opera-like titles. And even though it's currently out of print (which i agree is a shame), i lucked up on a used copy, and now i have to say, the recommendation software seems to know me pretty well by now, 'cause i really liked this book a lot, even though i had never heard of McAuley before. What I liked so much about "Eternal Light" were the strong characterizations, the ins-and-outs of the intriguing plot, and the extra-groovy settings, especially the colorful city of Urbis on Titan. The story did throw me just a little toward the end, when it seemed to roll right on past the climax into a long decline...but, that's not really a complaint, 'cause it was a fun ride the whole way, and i didn't mind spending extra time with the protagonists. Oh, and the aliens were interesting, the mind-blowing hyper-whatsits totally mind-blowing in just the right way, and the echoes of space operas past felt nice...all in all, a fine read for a long spell of midwinter cabin fever. So I guess what I'm saying is, hey Mr. or Ms. Book Publisher, you all oughta print up a few more of this title, to let other folks in on the magic of Mr. McAuley's wild imagination.
Samugul
Dorothy Yoshida is back, and again her telepathic abilities are part of someone's plots and plans. The war in the far flung reaches of space is won, but a bizarre and maybe crazy really old guy has a really large scale crazy idea of his own that he wants to carry out.

Dorothy, along with a couple of others that he has along for the ride, must work out what to do about that, the alien knowledge she has, and a few other star-spanning issues.