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eBook Empire Builders download

by Ben Bova

eBook Empire Builders download ISBN: 0812511654
Author: Ben Bova
Publisher: Tor Science Fiction (March 15, 1995)
Language: English
ePub: 1353 kb
Fb2: 1936 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mbr rtf lrf docx
Category: Pseudoscience
Subcategory: Science Fiction

part of Grand Tour Series. The author and publisher have provided this e-book to you without Digital Rights Management software (DRM) applied so that you can enjoy reading it on your personal devices. This e-book is for your personal use only

part of Grand Tour Series. This e-book is for your personal use only.

A published SF author from the late 1950s onward, Bova is one of the field's leading writers of "hard SF," science fiction based on plausible science and engineering

A published SF author from the late 1950s onward, Bova is one of the field's leading writers of "hard SF," science fiction based on plausible science and engineering. Among his dozens of novels are Millennium, The Kinsman Saga, Colony, Orion, Peacekeepers, Privateers, and the Voyagers series. Much of his recent work, including Mars, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn, The Precipice, and The Rock Rats, falls into the continuity he calls "The Grand Tour," a large-scale saga of the near-future exploration and development of our solar system.

Also like many Bova books, Empire Builders introduced plot elements that seemed to have no purpose. For a book written nearly 17 years ago, Empire Builders feels only slightly dated and the technological bits seem well done and realistic. There are no sweeping plasma cannon battles in space, but we are given a look at what humanity might be capable of 20-30 years from now.

He woke before sunrise, sitting up in his Western bed, beaded with sweat, an oppressive sense of doom weighing down on him. Sai’s not really dead, he muttered to himself as he stumbled through. the dark bedroom toward the toilet. They could revive him tomorrow if they wanted t. .Yeah, maybe, a voice inside his head replied. If they don’t kill him all over again in the thawing procedure. After a quick shower and a decision that he could skip shaving, Dan strapped on his wristwatch and checked the time in Paris. A little after eight in the evening

Empire Builders book. Another good outing by Ben Bova. I like the Dan Randolph Character, but really am not into the female love, Jane Thorton

Empire Builders book. Dan Randolph never plays by the rules. I like the Dan Randolph Character, but really am not into the female love, Jane Thorton. If there is one knock I have against Bova, it is the stereotypical way he writes characters.

The Stunning Sequel to Privateers.

Dan Randolph never plays by the rules.

Empire Builders: The Stunning Sequel to Privateers. Empire Builders - Ben Bova. A hell-raising maverick with no patience for fools, he is admired by his friends, feared by his enemies, and desired by the world's loveliest women. ONE. "I don’t want your crappy little company!" said Dan Randolph. The hell you don’t! Willard Mitchell snapped. Dan gave a disgusted snort and leaned back in the stiff unpadded chair.

Empire Builders Ben Bova Неизвестно 9781433229503 Бова Бен: Dan Randolph never plays by the rules. A hell-raising maverick with no patience for fools, he is admired by his friends, feared by hi. Кол-во: о цене Наличие: Отсутствует. Возможна поставка под заказ. При оформлении заказа до: 6 сен 2019 Ориентировочная дата поставки: начало октября При условии наличия книги у поставщика.

837837837837838 74 5 Author: Ben Bova Narrator: Stefan Rudnicki.

Dan Randolph never plays by the rules. A hell-raising maverick with no patience for fools, he is admired by his friends, feared by his enemies, and desired by the world's loveliest women. Acting as a twenty-first privateer, Randolph broke the political strangle-hold on space exploration, and became one of the world's richest men in the bargain.Now an ecological crisis threatens Earth--and the same politicians that Randolph outwitted the first time want to impose a world dictatorship to deal with it.Dan Randolph knows that the answer lies in more human freedom, not less--and in the boundless resources of space. But can he stay free long enough to give the world that chance?
Comments: (7)
Gnng
This is a direct sequel to "The Privateers", and takes place in the Ben Bova Universe as "Powersat" and others.

Basically, in continues the struggle for control of Space against the GEC (Their future version of the UN basically). Again a continuing story of Dan Randolph, Astro Manufacturing.et al, against..literally..the world. The story now ads the specter of climate change and global warming, and the efforts to combat it.

It can be a bit political I guess, but that is what Ben Bova writes at times. It is Science Fiction, taking place in the "near" future..much in the way Poul Anderson or Fredick Pohl wrote such stories. Science Fiction isn't all rocket ships and aliens after all. Read Robert Heinlein for an example.

It was a great read, and accelerated rapidly about a third of the way in the book. Bova books read very easily, are great to follow, and do not insult your intel;ligence. He gets you involved in the story and its easily followed. Very well written.

It is required reading for readers of this series. Highly recommended.
Dangerous
Not great but an easy reader and helpful to relax after reading something deeper. I wasn't disappointed and it adds to the themes Bova has presented without requiring one read those that came before. The characters appear before and after novels but unlike others yo don't need to read them to enjoy this one. Decent Character development of the good guys but not so good with the bad guys. Good explanation of the possible results of global warming without beating it to death.
Gaxaisvem
For those who like space opera, this will be a bit of a disappointment. The first two installments of the Grand Tour opus have remarkably little science, and instead focus much more on political machinations in a world dominated by the USSR (Privateers) and then by a a global economic organization which seems to be the target of organized crime. Throw in a bit of sex, some greenhouse issues (explained in a very elementary way), and you have quick, light reading. Suitable for a beach or subway ride, perhaps an airplane trip? But not Bova at his best.
JoJosho
As a bit of background for my review, I am attempting to read all (currently 17) of the Grand Tour novels in chronological order (which is not the order they were published in).

Empire Builders is the 2nd (or 3rd, depending on which books one includes in the Grand Tour series) book in a long, loosely affiliated group of books begun with Privateers (or PowerSat) and takes place about a decade after the events in Privateers. Many of the main characters from Privateers are back for a return engagement, including protagonist Dan Randolph as the playboy CEO of Astro corporation and antagonist Malik, Russian council member for the GEC (Global Economic Counsel, responsible for all space industry regulation). Jane Scanwell, former president of the United States and on again/off again love interest of Randoph is also back, along with Randolphs Japanese allies in Yamagato industries.

While Bova is usually classified as a sci-fi writer, Empire Builders (and its chronological predecessors PowerSat and Privateers) could also fall into the category of near future techno-thriller. While there are sci-fi elements, most of the somewhat limited space/technical details in the book are possible in the present day. In Empire Builders, the world stands on the brink of ecological disaster and only Randolph and his nemesis Malik are initially aware. Malik insists that the only way to avoid the greenhouse cliff is to have the GEC take control of the "Big 7" space companies along with major energy corporation on Earth. Randolph is out maneuvered legally and forced to go on the run on both the moon and Earth as the Malik and the GEC take control of his company. However, to avert the threat of a greenhouse disaster, all will eventually have to work together against international crime syndicate intent on leaching funds and supplies away from the GEC in its attempt to avert disaster.

The characters and plot layout of Empire Builders should be familiar to anyone who reads Bova. Randolph is, despite being at least 50 years old, still a billionaire playboy, sleeping with a different super model every month. Malik is still the throw back to the old Soviet Union. Many of the female characters are beautiful but have slept their way into their current positions, although Empire Builders does include one prominent female role where the character has not slept with every male who bats an eye at her. Empire Builders, like many other Bova books, leaves me wondering who Bova is writing for. Does he want to be Dan Randolph, or does he think all his male readers want to be Randolph? While Empire Builders does show Bova's support of environmental causes, the characters are often cliche enough induce wild eye-rolling.

Also like many Bova books, Empire Builders introduced plot elements that seemed to have no purpose. For example, near the end of the book a sub-plot where an earthquake takes place in the Gulf of Mexico creeps in. If there were more of a tie between greenhouse/pollution issues and earthquakes, it might make more sense, but as it stands it's like having the last 30 minutes of the movie Armageddon spliced into your favorite movie in five minute chunks. It probably wouldn't ruin your favorite movie but you'd be left wondering what the heck it was doing there. Perhaps a massive hurricane would have been a better fit, as hurricanes have some probable ties to global warming.

Criticism aside though, Empire Builders had a great pace and there's rarely a dull moment. There might be one or two too many self-reflection moments in which one of the characters reflects on the dumb thing they just did and why they shouldn't have done it, but otherwise Empire Builders builds pace and plot into a real page turner that was, to use a cliché, hard to put down. For a book written nearly 17 years ago, Empire Builders feels only slightly dated and the technological bits seem well done and realistic. There are no sweeping plasma cannon battles in space, but we are given a look at what humanity might be capable of 20-30 years from now.

I'd recommend Empire Builders strongly as long as you don't mind a book that is not terribly deep, the tolerance to put up with a mildy misogynistic protagonist and the understand that in 2011 we know quite a bit more about global warming than we did in 1994.
Xlisiahal
Not what I would call techno sci fi and thankfully not horror si fi, he deals more with human foibles, failings and the strength and courage of the few versus the mislead masses. Bova doesn't like business men or gov't types. He's a real fan of the lone hero even when he's a bit impractical minded. His heroes are exceptional lone wolves who manage to inspire a cadre of sometimes reluctant followers.
Mettiarrb
Although Bova is less than consistent in the details of his Grand Tour series, he always provides interesting characters, lots of action and great settings. A good read
santa
Bova crafts an enjoyable story. The plot is fast paced and his description of the near future is very plausible. His characters and character development, however, is not nearly as sophisticated as the story line. The characters exist only to push to the story along. In any event it is an enjoyable read
I love the way Ben Bova writes. The story keeps you glued to the book and the endings are amazing. I've been reading Ben Bova stories for years.

Charlie R.