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eBook Expiration Date (Fault Lines) download

by Tim Powers

eBook Expiration Date (Fault Lines) download ISBN: 0765317524
Author: Tim Powers
Publisher: Orb Books; 1 edition (March 20, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 384
ePub: 1169 kb
Fb2: 1612 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lit azw docx lrf
Category: Pseudoscience
Subcategory: Fantasy

Expiration Date book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Expiration Date (Fault Lines, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Expiration Date book. Los Angeles is filled with ghosts - and half-ghosts, and ghost.

Expiration Date is a 1996 fantasy novel by American writer Tim Powers. It was nominated for both the Nebula and World Fantasy Awards in 1996. The protagonists are Koot Hoomie "Kootie" Parganas, an eleven-year-old boy, and Pete "Teet" Sullivan, a man in his early forties. The novel takes place mostly in Los Angeles in the year 1992, and there are references to the United States presidential election.

Nebula Award Finalist: In the second book of the Fault Lines Trilogy, Tim Powers dazzles with a dark and extraordinary urban fantasy set in an otherworldly LA, as a young boy finds himself targeted by malevolent ghost hunters

Nebula Award Finalist: In the second book of the Fault Lines Trilogy, Tim Powers dazzles with a dark and extraordinary urban fantasy set in an otherworldly LA, as a young boy finds himself targeted by malevolent ghost hunters. There is a Los Angeles that few people can see, a shadowed metropolis of ghosts, ghost hunters, and ghost junkies who crave the addictive rush of inhaled spirits.

More than just two books for the price of one, this book brings together over 200,000 words of th. Declare.

Similar books to Expiration Date (Fault Lines Trilogy Book 2). "The Dream Daughter: A Novel" by Diane Chamberlain "Exciting and heartfelt. Chamberlain expertly blends the time-travel elements with the wonderful story of a mother’s love and the depths of sacrifice she makes for her child. This is a page-turning crowd-pleaser. Earthquake Weather (Fault Lines Trilogy Book 3). Tim Powers. Last Call: A Novel (Fault Lines Trilogy Book 1).

Expiration Date ranks with his best work. San Francisco Chronicle. athered lines of concrete with a strip of grass growing between. The steady background bump-and-hiss of the wind was punctuated by the hoarse shouts of crows trying to fly upwind.

Nebula Award Finalist: In the second book of the Fault Lines Trilogy, Tim Powers dazzles with a dark and extraordinary urban fantasy set in an otherworldly LA, as a young boy finds himself targeted by malevolent ghost hunters There is a Los Angeles that few people can see, a shadowed metropolis of ghosts, ghost hunters, and ghost junkies who crave the addictive rush. But Koot will not be taken easily. And though not everyone racing to Koot’s side means him harm, they are greatly outnumbered by malevolent forces driven by a terrible, undeniable need

ISBN 10: 0765317524 ISBN 13: 9780765317520. Publisher: Orb Books, 2007.

Los Angeles is filled with ghosts ― and half-ghosts, and ghost hunters, and ghost junkies ― chasing each other in a mad quest for immortality. As a series of disasters strikes Los Angeles, a young boy inhales the last breath of Thomas Edison, and becomes a precious prize in a deadly hunt for the elusive vital spark. Brimming with the wild imagination and heart-stopping escapades that won Tim Powers the World Fantasy Award, Expiration Date is an exuberant and inventive tale from one of fantasy's most original talents.

Comments: (7)
Renthadral
Tim Powers is always weird. He sucks you in to his weird parallel world that exists beside our own. I love the Book One-Last Call poker story, easy to relate luck and power to in my own life. I had to read this sequel. Again truly weird, The ghost eating and the Thomas Edison Ghost really add a creep factor unmatched by any other writer I know. I always read his novel length works, they never disappoint.
Xtani
I read this when it first hit the bookstores and immediately fell into the reality of the Powers-verse. Fantasy made reality, and it still works for me all these years later.
Gavigamand
Tim Powers is one of my favorite authors. He has an uncanny talent for taking crazy paranormal and mythological concepts, weaving them into settings in the modern world (or in a few of his books, the last few hundred years) and making the mixture seem entirely plausible. Expiration Date is a nice blend of the paranormal (ghosts, seances, folk myths (mostly Mexican-American & possibly Caribbean(?)) about the spirit world, telekinesis, etc.) and the modern (Los Angeles, primarily its Hollywood film history), into a weird yet somehow believable and definitely entertaining story. As some other reviewers have mentioned, it definitely is not one of Powers' easiest books to read: the storyline is complex, and he introduces strange ideas that sometimes aren't explained until later (or in some cases, left to the reader's imagination). Thus, reading Expiration Date requires focus and patience and sometimes the willingness to say, "OK, I have no idea what's going on, but I trust it will make sense later". But I found the effort to be well worth it: the story is a wild, crazy, twisty, fast ride, with characters that you really get to know and care about.
Gogul
Powers is hard to classify. He writes fantasy, but there sure aren't any trolls or hobbits or wizards here. His fantasy is a brilliant pastiche of the mystical detritus of several civilizations funnelled into the late twentieth century and then polished to a rare sheen by a fine, fine mind. He knows his stuff, and the more knowledge of Edison and Houdini and mysticism and spiritism you bring to him, the better you'll like this-- Powers gets it all right, and makes an entertaining story something more. This one's a bit more convoluted than Last Call, but just as rewarding. Along with its predecessor and sequel (Last Call and Earthquake Weather), this creation stands as a milestone of late 20th century fantasy, and should be enjoyed by all imaginative readers.
Delaath
I have read my Powers all out of order so far. I began with Earthquake Weather, moved into Last Call, went on to The Anubis Gates and have now finished Expiration Date. I guess of all of them, I like Experation Date the least.

Which is not to say that I did not enjoy it. I think that Powers is one of the most (if not *the* most) creative, inventive and possibly mad fantasy writers working today. It is rarely that I read a writer who really makes me say "How on earth did he think of *that*?"

Powers creates a plot centering around the ghost of Thomas Edison, the idea that ghosts can be inhaled for their essence, and complicated ideas about magic and superstition. Somehow he makes this plot feel almost inevitable-- it never feels odd for the sake of odd.

So why is it my least favorite? I think that it is largely an issue of comparison. For all that the premise in this book is highly believable, it's not quite as real to me as the Last Call world. There are a few too many characters and there are almost places where some of them feel as though they are driving the plot. But largely it is because I don't quite believe the motivation where deLarava is concerned-- I find her one of the weakest of the Powers characters and I have trouble buying her eventual character arc.

Still, any Powers is more worth reading more than the best book by almost anyone else.
Mr_Mole
Great read by Tim Powers. I had read and liked Last Call last year, and was excited to find out that it was considered part of a loose trilogy. Expiration Date read in the same fun and interesting way. I am looking forward to reading the third book in the Fault Lines trilogy.
I really enjoyed the use of existing technology to find and monitor ghosts. It was sort of like the 20th century take on steampunk ideas, but for street people who sell their finds on dirty bedspreads.
Mr.jeka
Great reading
There are too many boring details that don't help move the story along. I was able to skip large chunks of information and still understand the plot. The resolution is a bit simplistic as well and after the huge build-up I expected something that couldn't have been easily predicted. Go read other Tim Powers books to get an idea of how his writing can really draw you into a different world.