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eBook The Somnambulist (Gollancz) download

by Jonathan Barnes

eBook The Somnambulist (Gollancz) download ISBN: 0575082143
Author: Jonathan Barnes
Publisher: Gollancz (January 10, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1502 kb
Fb2: 1502 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: azw doc lrf lit
Category: Pseudoscience
Subcategory: Fantasy

Victoriana 01. by. Jonathan Barnes. This book is a work of fiction. This book was originally published in the United Kingdom in 2007 by Gollancz, an imprint of the Orion Publishing Group.

Victoriana 01. The characters, incidents, and dialogue are drawn from the author’s imagination and are not to be construed as real. Any resemblance to actual events or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental. Printed in the United States of America.

About Jonathan Barnes: Jonathan Barnes is the author of two novels, The Somnambulist and The Domino Me. Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Jonathan Barnes's books.

About Jonathan Barnes: Jonathan Barnes is the author of two novels, The Somnambulist and The Domino Men. He contributes regularly to the Times Literary.

This book has no literary merit whatsoever This is Jonathan Barnes’ first novel.

This book has no literary merit whatsoever. It is a lurid piece of nonsense, convoluted, implausible, peopled by unconvincing characters, written in drearily pedestrian prose, frequently ridiculous and wilfully bizarre. This is Jonathan Barnes’ first novel. Set in Victorian London, the story centers around a man named Edward Moon, a has-been conjurer. He has a mute side-kick named The Somnambulist.

Jonathan Barnes's The Somnambulist pays homage to the eccentricities of 19th-century fiction. Purists will object to some horribly 21st-century turns of phrase and grammarians should balk at Barnes's use, more than once, of 'he was sat'.

The Somnambulist is a 2007 fantasy/horror novel set in the late Victorian period, and is the debut novel by Jonathan Barnes

The Somnambulist is a 2007 fantasy/horror novel set in the late Victorian period, and is the debut novel by Jonathan Barnes. The protagonists Edward Moon, a conjurer and detective, and his silent partner The Somnambulist, a milk-drinking giant who does not bleed when stabbed, are called to investigate a murder that may tie to the poetry and prophecies of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and the fate of London.

The Somnambulist-a giant, milk-swigging mute-doesn't appear to be human at all, yet serves as Moon's moral as well as intellectual compass.

Something has gone wrong with history in this gripping novel about a lie planted among the greatest works of English fiction. Flamboyant, charismatic Matthew Cannonbridge was touched by genius, the most influential creative mind of the 19th century, a prolific novelist, accomplished playwright, the poet of his generation. The Somnambulist-a giant, milk-swigging mute-doesn't appear to be human at all, yet serves as Moon's moral as well as intellectual compass. Together, they wend their way through a London rich in period detail.

Somnambulist by Jonathan Barnes. Steampunk book at Provo Library. The Somnambulist - from a list of core Steam Punk fiction titles. Attention all fans of sensationalist Victorian fiction! If you haven't read The Somnambulist, you are missing out! Jonathan Barnes is a v. The Somnambulist by Jonathan Barnes One of the weirder books I read a number of years ago. Trying to find it ever since, to see if it's as strange as I remember. Victorian Era murder mystery by Jonathan Barnes populated by immensly shady characters. Definitely worth a read.

'Be warned. This book has no literary merit whatsoever. It is a lurid piece of nonsense, convoluted, implausible, peopled by unconvincing characters, written in drearily pedestrian prose, frequently ridiculous and wilfully bizarre. Needless to say, I doubt you'll believe a word of it.' So starts the extraordinary tale of Edward Moon, detective, his silent sidekick the Sonambulist and devilish plot to recreate the apocalyptic prophecies of William Blake and bring the British Empire crashing down. With a gallery of vividly grotesque characters, a richly evoked setting and a playful highly literate style this is an amazingly readable literary fantasy and a brilliant debut.
Comments: (7)
Perius
This is one of the weirdest novels I have ever read. It falls into the 'new weird' classification, with a sense that underneath a normal-seeming skin, the world is a distorted and deeply weird, even disturbing place. It made it a bit of a creepy read--not a bad thing, in my book! I loved the characters, who are correspondingly strange, touched by the shadows they dabble in and also by the choices of their own pasts. It left me unsettled and wanting more.
Hatе&love
"The Somnambulist" is without a doubt one of the oddest books I have read in a long time. Johnathan Barnes has a unique writting style that works well in combining suspense and some very subtle humor.

No plot spoilers from me. Set in Victorian England, the plot follows Edward Moon (AKA: The Conjurer), a once popular stage magician and showman who is also a part time detective, and his partner, The Somnambulist (a hulking mute with an odd ability and mysterious background), as they attempt to solve a truely bizzare series of murders.

I really enjoyed the book right up to the ending which was not as satisfying as it might have been. Still it was worthwhile and I also enjoyed the sequel, The Domino Men.

Recommended!
Yozshujinn
This book is exciting and enjoyable, though the reviews do not do it justice. For one, the setting is NOT Victorian, it is Edwardian. Constant comparison to Sherlock Holmes belittles the character of Edward Moon, who in no way resembles Holmes other than the fact that he is eccentric and lives around (not in) the Victorian era. The plot is complex and suspenseful, laid out skillfully by the untrustworthy narrator to beat them all.
The problem that I do see is that some things from the beginning of the book are not properly explained after the excitement of the second half. The reader is left with the vague suspicion that we haven't gotten the whole story, but a clever mind should be able to fill in the blanks without too much trouble.
Modifyn
Many elements in this book were entertaining, not least of which was the writing style. The characters were interesting and, for the most part, well developed; the storytelling style was fresh; and the steampunk overtones were a welcome distraction. However, the storyline, while interesting, was poorly executed, at times difficult to follow, and the ending falls flat. Worth reading, but not something I think I'll be going back to.
Axebourne
What I liked most about his book was the sense of complicity the author uses to establish a dialog with the reader. It is a good first try, if you keep in mind that it is a fantasy book, entertaining for a rainy afternoon. Do not expect too much: there are too many things not explained, characters not wholly developed and a general atmosphere of a cross between old police-detective-investigation meets vampires-witches-warlocks. Nevertheless, will keep an eye for his new work.
Kekinos
The Somnambulist - who is never named and who never speaks - is only the most featured oddity in Barnes' repetoire of strange men and women who populate turn-of-the-20th-century London. Others include a bearded lady with a formarm growing out of her chest, a man who lives life backwards through time, an albino spy, and various societal castoffs and misfits. The protagonist, a conjorur who merely travels in their circles - Edward Moon - seems almost normal by comparisson. Moon has to unravel a mystery. Who pushed a bit actor out of a window in a London tower in the wee hours of the morning, and more significantly, how did he scale the sheer stone wall of the tower to do it? The tale is narrated by someone who seems to be a part of the story, but we are not quite sure how until much later. Beleive me, it is worth the wait to find out. In the meantime, the old man sleeps far beneath the city. Like "Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrel," The "Historian," "The Alienist," or even Alan Moore's "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen," (see my other reviews, as well as my own book, Neitherworld for similar off-the-wall characters) we are treated to an crossroads time between the superstitious old times, with their myths and monsters, and our new modern age. Like all good scene setters, Barnes makes you feel the dank, dark London of the age in a few carefully chosen words. There is poetry here, as well as adventure. This is an author in control of his craft even in his debut novel. The middle gets a bit soggy but picks up well in the second half when Moon's captivating sister joins the chase. Barnes has enough confidence in himself to evolve his characters, and the bad become the good, and even the good sometimes the very, very bad. The author is taking chances, and pulling them off. Highly recommended.