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eBook Spider-Man: The Secret of the Sinister Six (Spider-Man (Ibook)) download

by Adam Troy Castro

eBook Spider-Man: The Secret of the Sinister Six (Spider-Man (Ibook)) download ISBN: 074345832X
Author: Adam Troy Castro
Publisher: I Books/Marvel; Reprint edition (February 25, 2003)
Language: English
ePub: 1496 kb
Fb2: 1170 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mbr lit lrf azw
Category: Pseudoscience
Subcategory: Fantasy

Spider-Man: Revenge of the Sinister Six. Contents.

Spider-Man: The Secret of the Sinister Six Gallery Title Spider-Man: The Secret of the Sinister Six Universe Earth-616 Novel Details Publisher Berkley Boulevard Books Writers Adam-Troy Castro Previous Novel Spider-Man: Revenge of the Sinister Six Contents Appearances Featured Characters. Spider-Man: Revenge of the Sinister Six.

I love the old time Spider-man shows and these Adam Troy Castro books bring out all the fun memories of wathing the old cartoons and reading the comic books. The title of the book is a little misleading, 90% of the book is about Mysterio and 10% is about the Gathering

I love the old time Spider-man shows and these Adam Troy Castro books bring out all the fun memories of wathing the old cartoons and reading the comic books. The title of the book is a little misleading, 90% of the book is about Mysterio and 10% is about the Gathering. Regardless of that it really is a great book.

And even though Spider-Man has the high-tech help of the super-spy . This is the 3rd book in a series of 3 written by Adam-Troy Castro.

And even though Spider-Man has the high-tech help of the super-spy organization . Adam-Troy Castro is a well-known author of science fiction, fantasy, and horror whose short stories have received five nominations for the Nebula Award, two for the Hugo Award, and one for the Stoker.

As the third book in the trilogy, this is the one where everything gets tied together and the bad guys are soundly defeated while the good guys, despite being battered and pounded and ending up in the hospital, emerge as victorious, once again. Even so, there are a number of nice surprises and a few startling revelations.

X-Men and Spider-Man: Time's Arrow Book 2 The Present, Berkely Boulevard,1998. Spider-Man: The Secret of the Sinister Six, Ibooks, 2002. Spider-Man: The Gathering of the Sinister Six, Berkeley Boulevard, 1999. An Alien Darkness, Wildside Press, 2000. A Desperate Decaying Darkness, Wildside Press, 2000. Spider-Man: The Revenge of the Sinister Six, Ibooks, 2001. Vossoff and Nimmitz: Just a Couple of Idiots Reupholstering Space and Time, Wildside Press 2002. Tangled Strings, Fivestar, 2003.

Spider-Man battles the most dangerous Sinister Six line-up ever: Doctor Octopus, Electro, Mysterio, the Vulture, the tragic but deadly Pity, and the group's mysterious leader, the Gentleman - a villain who had a hand in the deaths of Spider-Man's parents But what neither Spider-Man.

Spider-Man battles the most dangerous Sinister Six line-up ever: Doctor Octopus, Electro, Mysterio, the Vulture, the tragic but . March 2002 : USA Hardback.

Spider-Man battles the most dangerous Sinister Six line-up ever: Doctor Octopus, Electro, Mysterio, the Vulture, the tragic but deadly Pity, and the group's mysterious leader, the Gentleman - a villain who had a hand in the deaths of Spider-Man's parents! But what neither Spider-Man nor his enemies know is that the Gentleman is about to set his master plan into motion: destroying all the financial markets in the world and make himself the richest man in the world. As for the villainess Pity, Spider-Man has become convinced that she is his long-lost sister.

Written by Adam-Troy Castro, Audiobook narrated by Tim Paige

Written by Adam-Troy Castro, Audiobook narrated by Tim Paige.

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Discovering that he has a sister, who has been brainwashed into a life of crime by the Gentleman, the same super-villain responsible for his parents' deaths, Peter Parker finds himself having to confront a team of evildoers that also includes Doctor Octopus, Electro, the Vulture, and Mysterio. Reprint.
Comments: (7)
Sharpbringer
I read the first book of Mr. Adam Troy-Castro's "Revenge of the Sinister Six" by a friend's suggestion. I liked it. I read this one on my own.
It does have some positives. I like how the author breaks down the day into times building suspense like he did with the Day of Terror. I also saw some of Spidey's humor.

While I do like this story, there were some things that detracted from it. Despite what I read about it being for children 7 and up, there were a lot of h*lls, da**, G*d in the first, less in the second, but they were still there.

True, it's aimed towards teens, not sure why another would say it's ok for 7 year olds. Anyhow, I find that just because you are a city cop, and a member of S.H.E.I.L.D doesn't mean it's an excuse to say that all the time. I find it's cliched.

Another thing that detracts is, while I enjoy the Sinister Six team, seeing several 'new' or unheard of characters just show up in a few paragrahs, takes a lot to remember who they are and who they work for.

In addition to, this I see alot of paragraphs of 'tell and show' of Spidey's powers, and what a villain is like. I had to admit I skipped over a few pages of this.

Lastly, the ending with another character was just too random. Sure it was a surprise, but it seemed like any character from any universe was jumping in.
I do however like the ending with the Gentlemen and what happens to him.
Agagamand
"Spider-Man: The Secret of the Sinister Six" concludes Adam-Troy Castro's Sinister Six Trilogy, which began with "The Gathering of the Sinister Six" (1999) and "The Revenge of the Sinister Six" (2001). The story explains the Gentleman's motives in assembling the Sinister Six against Spider-Man and is packed with well-written action sequences. Castro links his novel to previous Spider-Man books such as Diane Duane's "The Octopus Agenda" (one piece of exposition references Doctor Octopus' plan in that novel) as well as to the events of the comics. Each chapter begins with art by Mike Zeck, though the images are rather primitive when compared to the art that accompanied Duane's novels.
Castro has an odd habit of dropping pop culture references in whenever possible. While other writers have done this, it feels more jarring in his case since he often refers to characters from other media as co-existing alongside Spider-Man. This novel alone contains references to a treasure-hunter named Belloque (referencing Belloq from "Raiders of the Lost Ark"), John McClane ("Die Hard"), Detective Lenny Briscoe ("Law & Order"), Casper Gutman (referencing Kasper Gutman from "The Maltese Falcon"), FBI Agent Starling ("The Silence of the Lambs"), and the entire Mystery, Inc. gang from "Scooby Doo" in the epilogue. All of these characters are supposed to exist in the same world as Spider-Man and be just as real as he. In addition, Castro references "Independence Day", "Armageddon", and has Spider-Man quote one of Peter Graves' lines from "Airplane!" just prior to a plane crash. While readers might view some of these as "Easter Eggs," a few derail the narrative (especially the appearance of Mystery, Inc. at the end). What's more, Castro's take on Spider-Man's banter usually involves variations on pookie and bunkie instead of the witticisms employed by the comic's writers.
Speaking of Castro's writing, the novel is populated with typographical errors. Some are minor, but there are often whole words missing from sentences or spaces missing between words. The plot, and the Gentleman's plan, while reminiscent of comics stories in the 1990s, was already dated in 2002 by the events of 9/11. Readers will be struck by the improbability of much of these events occurring without the involvement of Homeland Security or some other real-world counter-terrorism task force.
With these caveats in mind, Castro does write engaging action sequences and Peter Parker/Spider-Man's struggle to save Pity, who may be his sister, elicits genuine emotion from the reader. The epilogue, prior to the sequence with Mystery, Inc., is quite touching. Those who have read the previous two novels will want to check this out for a sense of closure, but those who are only just exploring Marvel's Spider-Man novels might want to start with other books.
Uaoteowi
I am a huge fan of Spiderman comics and the movies. I saw this book in a used book store and I had to pick it up and see what the Webslinger was up to. I had picked up the previous book and it was pretty good, the Day of Terror showed that Spiderman wasn't intimidated by the Sinister Six and he was willing to take them all on.

This book was pretty good and it stayed pretty true to what happened in the comics. There is mention of a lot of the event comics that led up to what happened in this book including Onslaught, the Asgardian fire demons, and the Atlantian invasion just to name a few.

Plus throughout the book we have constant references to other super heroes and other super villains plus things that happened in the comics over the years. That is something I really liked, it made me smile to hear Spiderman reference things that happened in comics I have read.

***SPOILERS*** ***SPOILERS*** ***SPOILERS***

The book does have a LOT of pop culture references, sometimes to the point where you almost wanna say enough is enough! When they start mentioning Super Mario and Homer Simpson it kinda made me roll my eyes and wanted to get back to the action.

There is also WAAAY too much killing in this book. In the comics the Sinister Six are always causing property damage, but we never really see them flat out KILL someone. In this book people are being killed as a result of their actions. It was a different angle on things and it wasn't something I really liked.

Also, the main villain of this book, the guy who is plotting everything and paying the Sinister Six to do what they're doing, is named "The Gentleman." He has his little lackey with him that he named "Pity," and he keeps her in servitude to him, but he is WAAAAAY to rough on this girl! He yells at her, belittles her, insults her, starves her, beats her, makes her sleep in horrible places, and do humiliating things. He goes way too far. Seriously! Emperor Palpatine would tell this guy to lighten up! Even the members of the Sinister Six: Doc Ock, The Chameleon, Electro, The Vulture, and Mysterio, all of which are murderers, have kidnapped people, stolen and caused millions of dollars in property damage even tell him that he's going too far and tell The Gentleman that if he doesn't stop hitting her that they'll quit the team and kick his ass.

A mistake that the author makes repeatedly is that he refers to the Empire State Building as "The Empire State." If you say, "The Empire State" you are referring to New York State, because New York is nick-named, "The Empire State." I know it's a minor thing but it's something that kinda bugs me.

I will admit that this book is awesome the way it shows Spiderman racing all over New York trying to stop the villains from doing what they are doing. The fights are great as well! Setting super hero battles in the middle of the worst snow storm in New York City history was a stroke of genius that I would have never really thought of if I was writing a Spiderman story and I have to tip my hat to the writer for thinking of this!

In the end I was very glad to see that Doc Ock took his revenge on the Gentleman and he refused to be taken advantage of anymore. Also the twist at the end really comes outta left field and was something I didn't see coming. I wondered where the Chameleon had went and we find out at the end that he also had a master plan of his own!

The epilogue was kinda disappointing. The writer has Wolverine show up, ditch the bomb that was hidden in the Parkers' house and tie up the last few remaining loose plot threads. It seemed kinda rushed like it was thrown together at the last minute by the author to wrap up a few things he forgot about.

Then in the final part of the epilogue we find that Pity did survive the crash into the ocean, but she is in Maine on a journey of self-exploration. She is walking along the side of the road and she is literally picked up by the Scooby-Doo gang. I'm serious, a van shows up and four people are inside, their descriptions match the gang perfectly and they even have a Great Dane with them. They want to find out how she got there and they state that, "it's a mystery!" That was just stupid!

***END SPOILERS*** ***END SPOILERS*** ***END SPOILERS***

So in the end I really enjoyed reading this book and it was something I recommend this to fans of Spiderman and the Sinister Six!