carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Blood of Dragons (Rain Wilds Chronicles, Book 4)

eBook Blood of Dragons (Rain Wilds Chronicles, Book 4) download

by Robin Hobb

eBook Blood of Dragons (Rain Wilds Chronicles, Book 4) download ISBN: 0062116851
Author: Robin Hobb
Publisher: Harper Voyager; First Edition edition (April 9, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 448
ePub: 1456 kb
Fb2: 1439 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: azw lit lrf docx
Category: Pseudoscience
Subcategory: Fantasy

The final volume in Robin Hobb's popular Rain Wilds fantasy series, Blood of Dragons completes the story of the . view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook.

The final volume in Robin Hobb's popular Rain Wilds fantasy series, Blood of Dragons completes the story of the dragons.

Blood of Dragons book. I rather enjoyed the finale to Hobb’s Rain Wild Chronicles, but I think it’s unanimously accepted that this series just does not reach the same standards as her other trilogies

Blood of Dragons book. I rather enjoyed the finale to Hobb’s Rain Wild Chronicles, but I think it’s unanimously accepted that this series just does not reach the same standards as her other trilogies. But over the four books I’ve come to really enjoy reading about the clan of dragons, watching them grow and become sassy and powerful!. Apart from the dragons and some recurring characters who shall remain nameless for fear of spoilers, I was a tiny bit disappointed in some of them.

She is the author of five critically acclaimed fantasy series: The Rain Wilds Chronicles (Dragon Keeper, Dragon Haven, City of Dragons, Blood of Dragons), The Soldier Son Trilogy, The Tawny Man Trilogy, The Liveship Traders Trilogy, and The Farseer Trilogy. Under the name Megan Lindholm she is the author of The Wizard of the Pigeons, Windsingers, and Cloven Hooves.

The final instalment of Robin Hobb’s Sunday Times best-selling series The Rain Wild Chronicles. Blood of Dragons is the fourth and final book in the Rain Wilds Chronicles by Robin Hobb. Attacked by hunters, Tintaglia is dying of her wounds. If she perishes, her ancestral memories will die with her and the dragons in the ancient city of Kelsingra will lose the secret knowledge they need to survive.

The dragons' survival hangs in the balance in the thrilling final volume in the acclaimed River Wilds Chronicles fantasy series. The dragons and their dedicated band of keepers have at last found the lost city of Kelsingra

The dragons' survival hangs in the balance in the thrilling final volume in the acclaimed River Wilds Chronicles fantasy series. The dragons and their dedicated band of keepers have at last found the lost city of Kelsingra. The magical creatures have learned to use their wings and are growing into their regal inheritance. Their humans, too, are changing. As the mystical bonds with their dragons deepen, Thymara, Tats, Rapskal, and even Sedric, the unlikeliest of keepers, have begun transforming into beautiful Elderlings raked with exquisite features that complement and reflect the dragons.

Blood of Dragons, . Part of Rain Wild Chronicles series by Robin Hobb. It was another rule they had grown up with. All Rain Wild children knew the danger of dallying in the stored memories in the stones

Blood of Dragons, . All Rain Wild children knew the danger of dallying in the stored memories in the stones. More than one youngster had been lost to them, drowned in memories of other times. Rapskal had shrugged her concerns aside.

The Rain Wilds Chronicles. Blood of dragons Well written, fascinating story. The Tawny Man Trilogy 3-Book Bundle. by Peter on March 20, 2013.

The Rain Wilds Chronicles: The Complete 4-Book Collection. The Dragon Keeper Dragon Haven City of Dragons Blood of Dragons. This novel is entirely a work of fiction.

The complete Rain Wild Chronicles by international bestselling author Robin Hobb. This bundle includes DRAGON KEEPER, DRAGON HAVEN, CITY OF DRAGONS and BLOOD OF DRAGONS. blue dragon Tintaglia, they came from the sea: a Tangle of serpents fighting their way up the Rain Wilds River, the first to make the perilous journey in generations. But the creatures which emerge from the cocoons are a travesty of the powerful, shining dragons of old. Stunted and deformed, they cannot fly. Soon they become a danger and a burden to the Rain Wilders: something must be done.

Blood of Dragons is the fourth and final book in the Rain Wilds Chronicles by Robin Hobb. I don't remember them being an important factor in this series at all until this book.

The final volume in Robin Hobb's popular Rain Wilds fantasy series, Blood of Dragons completes the story of the dragons, their keepers, and their quest to find the lost city of Kelsingra—and the mythical silver wells that the dragons need to survive.

Can Tintaglia and the Elderlings unlock the secrets of the ancient city? Or are they doomed to extinction?

The world of Robin Hobb’s Rain Wilds series has been praised by Booklist as "one of the most gripping settings in modern fantasy," and Publishers Weekly called the Rain Wilds books "a meticulously realized fantasy tale" and "a welcome addition to contemporary dragon lore."

Comments: (7)
Dolid
I actually bought my Kindle in order to read "Assassin’s Apprentice", which was highly recommended but musty. I loved the "The Farseer Trilogy," but think Robin Hobb's writing has gone downhill since then. These four "Rain Wild Chronicles" books could have been easily condensed into two by removing a lot of the angst. It was feeling YA-y towards the end. However, I did very much enjoy the way she wrapped up the Hest plotline :D

Never-the-less, I see there is a "Fitz and the Fool Trilogy" and am going to get that (from the library) after I reread "The Tawny Man Trilogy."
Kamick
Originally I picked up “Dragon Keeper” because I love anything dragon, not because it was Robin Hobb. In actuality truth be told I had never heard of her before. But now… I am a total convert. I absolutely loved the Rain Wild Chronicles. “Blood of Dragons” is a wonderful ending to the series… or is it? Could there be more? Sure but for now I will just have to be content with going back and reading her other books.

While I can’t say too much as to not let go of the ending I will say that reading this book was like watching “All My Children”. There were so many things that just kept pulling me forward and had me on the end of my seat. What happens to Tintaglia? Will the baby survive? How will it end with Hest and Alise? Will Thymara make a decision already? What is happening to Rapskal and will he snap out of it? The Dragons…. Will they get the silver they need, and at what cost? There are so many intricate details regarding the city that it’s hard to not be lost in the pages of Kelsingra.

There was really only one ending that would have been satisfactory for me and it was delivered. Hobbs really does immerse you in a whole new world with so much to explore.
The journey there is priceless and I for one hope that there is much more to come.
Beanisend
This series has drawn a good many complaints from those who think it's all too slow.

Noticing the apparent importance of the word "chronicles" in the series title might help temper expectations.This series doesn't present itself as say, Rivers of Acid, Torrents of Misery or Short Scaly Tales for Midnight Reading. Transformations: A Case Study? Not that either. Leisurely Character Studies Along A River, maybe?

The problem, I think, is that when the first book in this series came out, it was believed to be the first of two. As a fan of Robin Hobbs books in general, it seemed odd to me that a story paced that way COULD be part of a two-book tale, and sure enough, the story kept going, and going, and going. The pace she set at the start, is the pace she continues with, pretty much.

Right near the end, the author does indulge in a bit of paraphrase, but since I was more interested in the stuff she put in than the stuff she truncated, and was ready for her to wrap things up, I'm happy with it. I really didn't need to read every bit of every scene from the perspective of every character we've met along the way, even if it might have been kind of satisfying to know the particulars.

In retrospect, and after having re-read the rest of the series in anticipation of this new title, overall, the pacing in the series is a bit slow, the author clearly could have condensed some of it quite a lot, and I wish that the general tone of the books were a bit less tortured, but over all, I've realized that I'm happy with the story she tells. It's a long, leisurely character based ramble along a river. The villains and the war? Part of the story, but not the goal. If you're looking for lots of fights, or something to translate into a movie, maybe read something else. (Though I do think this world would make for a great video game. Lots of fabulous locations, treasure to find, villains to foil, skills to develop, etc. Plus, the acidic river? what a great obstacle.)

Mercedes Lackey's Chronicles of Valdemar has the same problem of pacing, I think, but I do wonder if Lackey even HAS an overarching story to tell. (I get the feeling that she's just churning out Valdemar stories for the sake of selling books, not because she's got anything especially interesting to say about Valdemar, the Companions or the people of Velgarth)

Robin Hobb clearly does have stories to tell here, slow as they might be, and she does a remarkable job keeping track of the details.

For those who haven't read anything else of hers, give the rest a try. Starting at the beginning is kind of logical, (i.e., Assassin's Apprentice) but I really do think that as long as you begin a series at the start, you shouldn't have any trouble figuring out what's going on. The Soldier's Son series is set elsewhere, and has a somewhat darker, creepier tone.

As for newbies to this author, there are elements of this series that would probably be more interesting to those who've always wondered what's going on in the mysterious Rain Wilds, which kind of implies that you have to KNOW the Rain Wilds exist in order to build up any wonderment, but if you're in the mood for a leisurely read, this might fit the bill. Definitely start this series at the beginning.

I look forward to her next series, no matter where it's set. She's one of my favorite authors (I think Lois McMaster Bujold tops the list.).
Stonewing
I really enjoyed this book while I was reading it, but once it was done I just found it to be a bit underwhelming, which is something I'd never say about any of Robin Hobb's other trilogy endings. The writing is classic Hobb, where it is incredibly enjoyable to read and all of the characters are completely unique and entertaining. There's also a bit of character torture going on here, but it's really only one character, as all of the other good main characters have it pretty easy in Blood of Dragons (which is surprising considering Hobb's track record). The one thing I didn't love about the character development (everything else was great) was that Hobb had a strong tendency in this book to pair up all of the human and dragon characters together like a matchmaker. I'm sure that it's bound to happen when a group of young people (and dragons) go on an adventure and start a new settlement, but it felt a little forced at times.

The story for Blood of Dragons is pretty basic, where the dragons and new elderlings continue to grow/change and they have to deal with the threat to all dragonkind from Chalced. That's basically it beyond all of the different character interactions and development. I expected a bigger climax from the confrontation with Chalced, but because of the chosen viewpoints and the style of storytelling for this section, which mostly occurs with a character recollecting what happened at a later date, it was just a bit of a letdown. Still, the events in this book have really changed the world, and the future books by Robin Hobb could be very interesting.

If you've read the previous books in The Rain Wilds Series, you should definitely read The Blood of Dragons, as it does pretty nicely tie all of the different plotlines in a knot. However, I'd defintely advise a new reader to start with Hobb's Farseer or Liveship Trilogies.