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eBook Dancers at the End of Time (HB) *OP (The Eternal Champion) download

by Michael Moorcock

eBook Dancers at the End of Time (HB) *OP (The Eternal Champion) download ISBN: 1565041860
Author: Michael Moorcock
Publisher: White Wolf Publishing; 1st Hardcover Ed edition (May 1, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 534
ePub: 1873 kb
Fb2: 1236 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lit rtf mobi rtf
Category: Pseudoscience
Subcategory: Fantasy

Definitely the most ornate of the many Eternal Champion books, the Dancers book literally drip with the times of Oscar .

Definitely the most ornate of the many Eternal Champion books, the Dancers book literally drip with the times of Oscar Wilde and company, every sentence is flowering and flowing, wrapping around themselves several times, almost wallowing in their lyrical flavor before leading directly into the next on. and then read Elric at the End of Time, if you can find it. Moorcock mocking himself is truly at his peak.

Treading water between epics, Michael Moorcock here offers us a collection of five short (ish) stories, all taking place within the decadent setting he first introduced to us in "The Dancers at the End of Time" cycle. These stories all span the same time period as the above collection, and take place during Jherek Carnelian and Amelia Underwood's voyages away from the end of time.

The Dancers at the End of Time is a series of science fiction novels and short stories written by Michael Moorcock, the setting of which is the End of Time, an era "where entropy is king and the universe has begun collapsing upon itself"

The Dancers at the End of Time is a series of science fiction novels and short stories written by Michael Moorcock, the setting of which is the End of Time, an era "where entropy is king and the universe has begun collapsing upon itself". The inhabitants of this era are immortal decadents, who create flights of fancy via the use of power rings that draw on energy devised and stored by their ancestors millions of years prior

Book I. Michael Moorcock. The eternal champion. The sword and the stallion. The Dancers at the End of Time.

Book I. Cover art by Robert Gould. Other Books By Michael Moorcock. The dragon in the sword. The end of all songs. Legends from the end of time.

Eternal Champion Tale of the Eternal Champion Dancers at the End of Time The Eternal .

Eternal Champion Tale of the Eternal Champion Dancers at the End of Time The Eternal Champion Sequence - 1. , more. Michael Moorcock’s cycle of three novels is a tribute to the decadent dandyism of fin de siècle England with such colorful personalities as Oscar Wilde, Max Beerbohm and Aubrey Beardsley. Since I'm a huge fan of Decadent classics, Against Nature by Joris-Karl Huysmans comes immediately to mind, and also New Wave SF, I found every page of this singular Michael Moorcock positively scrumptious - so much so, I even created a special black and yellow bookmark from a Victor Vasarely print to match the.

Elric of melniboné the sailor on the seas of fate the weird of the white wolf the vanishing tower the bane of the black sword stormbringer. The Chronicles of Castle Brass. It has been completely reset in a typeface designed for easy reading and was printed from new film. The dancers at the end of time: legends from the end of time. An Ace Book/published by arrangement with the author.

Published June 2000 by White Wolf Publishing. Prefer the physical book?

Published June 2000 by White Wolf Publishing. Prefer the physical book? Check nearby libraries with: WorldCat.

A monumental science fiction epic that blends humor and romance in a story that spans all of space and time.

Enter a decaying far, far future society, a time when anything and everything is possible, where words like 'conscience' and 'morality' are meaningless, and where heartfelt love blossoms mysteriously between Mrs Amelia Underwood, an unwilling time traveller, and Jherek Carnelian, a bemused denizen of the End of Time.

Enter a decaying far, far future society, a time when anything and everything is possible, where words like 'conscience' and 'morality' are meaningless, and where heartfelt love blossoms mysteriously between Mrs Amelia Underwood, an unwilling time traveller, and Jherek Carnelian, a bemused denizen of the End of Time. The Dancers at the End of Time, containing the novels An Alien Heat, The Hollow Lands and The End of All Songs, is a brilliant homage to the 1890s of Wilde, Beardsley and the fin de siecle decadents, satire at its sharpest and most colourful.
Comments: (6)
Funky
Definitely the most ornate of the many Eternal Champion books, the Dancers book literally drip with the times of Oscar Wilde and company, every sentence is flowering and flowing, wrapping around themselves several times, almost wallowing in their lyrical flavor before leading directly into the next one. For once, Moorcock manages to deliver this high minded language without sounding pretentious, not many people could pull that off. And his world here is as far from the blood drenched sword and sorcery conflicts that make up the Elric, Corum, Hawkmoon books, like the Jerry Cornelius books (who both the characters and the plots mostly resemble) nothing seems to happen even as the action is spiraling around, philosophy that most writers would spend entire books on is tossed off in careless comments, the Law/Chaos arugments are brought up again but you don't even notice. The best part is the character interaction, for all their decadence and carelessness, the Dancers are a bit of a lovable bunch because of their innocence and you can't help cheering on the burgoning romance of Amelia and Jherek, both savoring the long drawn out tension and cursing that she doesn't ditch that loser of a husband and go with Jherek. The romance is at the center of the book and Moorcock knows it, he aptly illustrates the passions that just burn underneath the surface of the two lovers and makes you sympathize with their conflicts. Deep down inside you know they're going to be together but since this is a Moorcock book you wonder what form. The happy ending is nice for once as well, one can only stomach Elric's seemingly endless self pity for so long, entertaining and thought provoking as it is. This series basically rewrites the Jerry Cornelius books, takes out the stuff that made it nearly incomprehensible (if you've read them you know exactly what I mean) and layers the plot on thick, some people complain they had trouble following it, coming off some of his more complicated stuff, this couldn't be easier, heck I guessed a lot of the twists before they happened, but I missed nearly as many as well. All in all, one of the more entertaining and well rounded Eternal Champion books, it even has some great guest appearance by other characters from the other series (and what Moorcock book would be incomplete without that?), it offers adventure, romance and some philosophy in a nice package that leaves you with a good feeling when you've finished. Doesn't get better than this.
Antuiserum
I have the original paperback trilogy, which is here presented as one book. You need not have read Moorcock's other works to enjoy this, and it doesn't have the dark and brooding atmosphere of some of his Eternal Champion stuff (though a few of the individual characters do enjoy that sort of thing). Since the playful and jaded people at the End of Time have the power to do anything they want, with no danger (if they happen to die, they can always resurrect, for instance), there are no logical limits or dangers requiring the development of taboos. They don't even have a clear concept of what is pleasant and what is not; their most damning description for an experience is "dull". The most interesting parts of the books, IMHO, deal with the violently clashing sensibilities of the End of Time people and time-and-space travellers who happen upon them, such as Mrs. Amelia Underwood of Victorian England. That and the preposterous visual imagery and terrible historical malapropisms. I find these books hysterically funny. If you're familiar with Moorcock's Elric books, read the End of Time trilogy...and then read Elric at the End of Time, if you can find it. Moorcock mocking himself is truly at his peak.
Mariwyn
This volume, number ten in the Eternal Champion cycle, is a joy to read, having dated little in the couple of decades since the stories were written. (And anyway, what are a few decades when viewed from the sublime perspective of the End of Time?) The fantastical, hedonistic, anything-goes society at the very end of the Universe is depicted with all the imaginative gusto that is Michael Moorcock's hallmark. The romance between Jherek Carnelian (anti-hero Jerry Cornelius in a more sympathetic incarnation) and his staid Victorian Mrs Underwood, set against this backdrop, is all the more touching for the contrast. Familiar time-travellers Una Persson and Oswald Bastable turn up (I kept waiting for Mrs Cornelius to put in an appearance,) to prove that this world is but one aspect of many in the great hall of mirrors that is the Moorcockian Multiverse. To sum up, no swords in evidence but plenty of sorcery. Pure magic, in fact.
Sarin
Michael Moorcock has created an extremely complex work in The Dancers series, making serious comments about the natures of and differences between art, life, religion and love. In the far, far future, humanity is comprised all of artists and their society which is all surface. They have no self-consciouness of this, but live the lives of fin-de-siecle bohemians with the power of gods. Thrust deliberately into this mix are time travellers, space travellers, and coming end of the Universe. Manipulated into falling love, the last human born of a woman, Jherek Carnelian, seeks the English Victorian Christian Amelia Underwood. Jherek is a pure artist, and Amelia is the anti-artist. Still, Jherek pursues her across time, falls in love with her, and changes his nature to please her. By turns funny, moving, and thoughtful, these books are English at their deepest core, speculating on the Nature of the English Soul released from all inhibition, want, and sense of sin, and rediscovering them happily.
Granirad
The "Eternal Champion" series has proven to be a valuable addition to the Moorcock collection. If you never rummaged through used book stores, then you would have never read all Moorcock has to offer. In 'Dancers' you get a comedy that reads like a sit-com on LSD. As previously stated, the prose flows with wit and adds entertaining jabs at English arrogance and religious fanatics. The colorful cast of characters are kept very true thoughout the three stories. I found it immensely entertaining to try to anticipate how the cast of characters would reunite (as they always do.) I had a hard time getting started, but could not stop reading after the first story.