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by Fred Saberhagen

eBook The Third Book of Lost Swords: Stonecutter's Story download ISBN: 0312930739
Author: Fred Saberhagen
Publisher: St Martins Pr; First Edition edition (May 1, 1988)
Language: English
Pages: 247
ePub: 1761 kb
Fb2: 1540 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lit docx lrf azw
Category: Pseudoscience
Subcategory: Fantasy

Cover Art : Harry O. Morris. This is a work of fiction. All the characters and events portrayed in this book are fictitious, and any resemblance to real people or events is purely coincidental. All rights reserved, including the right to reproduce this book, or portions thereof, in any form.

A good book in its own Fred Saberhagen uses his swords setting to write a different genre of book. Fred Saberhagen was an American science fiction and fantasy author most famous for his ''Beserker'' and Dracula stories. The story is pretty good and most of the time pretty well wrapped up with little loose ends. Saberhagen also wrote a series of a series of post-apocalyptic mytho-magical novels beginning with his popular ''Empire of the East'' and continuing through a long series of ''Swords'' and ''Lost Swords'' novels.

The Third Book of Lost Swords: Stonecutter's Story. This book does read like a Sherlock Holmes story, but based in a fantasy setting. The main appeal for this book being Saberhagen using a different style and expanding on the setting for the Lost Swords series

The Third Book of Lost Swords: Stonecutter's Story. The main appeal for this book being Saberhagen using a different style and expanding on the setting for the Lost Swords series. Stonecutter is stolen from an ally of Prince Mark. Also expanded upon are the Blue and Red Temples. Basically, this book is a fun and light read.

into the city with him from the desert. Though it was plain to Kasimir that the Prince would have preferred to leave the palace at once and have a long talk with Wen Chang, there was no opportunity inside the palace for the two men to converse without a high probability of being overheard.

Stonecutter's Story: The Third Book of Lost Swords, (Tor May 1988). Volumes 1, 2 & 3 were reprinted in an omnibus version called The Lost Swords: The First Triad, (SFBC/Nelson Doubleday Sep. Farslayer's Story: The Fourth Book of Lost Swords, (Tor July 1989). Coinspinner's Story: The Fifth Book of Lost Swords, (Tor Dec. 1989). 1988); Volumes 4, 5 & 6 were reprinted in a second omnibus version called The Lost Swords: The Second Triad, (Tor/SFBC May 1991); Volumes 7 & 8 were reprinted in a third and final omnibus version called The Lost Swords: Endgame, (SFBC/GuildAmerica Books June 1994). Original Swords anthology. The Fourth Book of Lost Swords: Farslayer's Story. The Fifth Book of Lost Swords: Coinspinner's Story. The Sixth Book of Lost Swords: Mindsword's Story. The Seventh Book of Lost Swords: Wayfinder's Story. The Last Book of Lost Swords: Shieldbreaker's Story.

Tor books by Fred Saberhagen. The Third Book of Lost Swords: Stonecutter's Story. The berserker series. A Century of Progress.

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Books related to The Third Book Of Lost Swords. The Third Book Of Swords.

series Saberhagen's Lost Swords. Books related to The Third Book Of Lost Swords. The First Book Of Lost Swords. The Fifth Book Of Lost Swords. The Sixth Book Of Lost Swords.

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Four very different people--Prince al-Farabi, Kasimir, a young physician, the wise magistrate Wen Chang, and Natalia, an inhabitant of a House of Pleasure in the city of Eylan--pursue the stolen Stonecutter, the Sword of Siege.
Comments: (5)
Whitemaster
If you've been following this series, this one will throw you off a bit. It's still an interesting read, but pretty much abandons the main characters to go on a Sherlock Holmes-like tangent.

Stonecutter, a magical sword forged by the gods with the power to cut through any stone, is loaned to a desert prince by Prince Mark of Tasavalta and is then promptly stolen under mysterious circumstances. A young doctor, Kasimir, feels bad because he was in the tent when the sword was taken and feels obligated to find the thief and retrieve the sword. He's in luck when he runs into a famous Magistrate, Wen Chang, who agrees to take on the investigation for the prince and takes Kasimir along for the ride. Twists abound as they follow the trail of the sword which keeps changing hands as various underground groups and individuals steal the sword from each other for their own reasons.

The most fun I got out of this book was trying to identify all of the mega inspector and his trusty companion cliches. Amusing, but not the best of Saberhagan's work.
KiddenDan
Having picked up this book after (actually while) reading the First (that should have remained the only) Swords Trilogy I must admit that my expectations were a bit high - afterall, The Stonecutter's story is nothing but a spin-off. However, this book not only doesn't measure up to the first three, it is simply poorly written. In more than a few places in the text the characters refer to the events in exactly the same words as the author himself, not a dozen lines before. Usually economical writing style of Saberhagen deteriorates to the level of a comics book. The story itself has nothing of the grand scale of the First Swords setting - having read these back to back you are bound to have an attack of claustrophobia. Instead it centers on the recovery of the stolen Sword with all usual trimmings of the Sherlock Holmes story, sans the thrill. Moreover, the Magistrate himself looks like a homage (or a rip-off) to the venerable creation of Sir Conan Doyle, with Dr. Kasimir filling the niche of his sidekick, Dr. Watson. Injection of utterly modern political twist in the form of some Steppe democrat (imprisoned for his attempt to institute local councils in his native prairies) makes the entire novel even less readable. "Clues" are so plain and abundant, that the only way to make this book more predictable would be to put the last chapter in the beginning of it... Overall, it's a hastily written (and apparently never proof-read) bad political whodunit which just happens to have a Sword in it.
Duktilar
Saberhagen's lost swords novels are more like episodes in a universe, without being intricately tied together plot-wise (for the most part) but while maintaining a certain style. This book departs from most of the others in having a brand new cast of characters who must solve a mystery regarding the theft of the sword Stonecutter, which was on loan to a prince from Prince Mark of Tasavalta. A thoroughly Sherlock Holmes reminiscent story of fantasy intrigue (It does not approach thriller territory), it is for the most part a book of light fantasy, but an enjoyable one if you're looking for something easy to read and fun.

I've never understood the generally low ratings for these books on Amazon. They certainly aren't Tolkien, but they have a solid premise and the stories are handled competently by Saberhagen.
Dynen
This was a swell book. I enjoyed the way it fell together. Even though the red temple was a little much, I still give it a five star review. This book had twists, and kept you yearning for more. Wen Chang was a great character, but Kasimir was better. If you want a good book to read on the weekend, pick this one up, because you're in store for a great book. Fred Saberhagen shines in this great story of the quest to find Stonecutter.
Shem
'Stonecutter's Story' is better than the previous two 'Swords' books. The plot is more interesting and Saberhagen uses more dialogue to move the story along, but in the end, it's just as pointless as the first two. The good guys will prevail no matter how imposing the opponent.