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eBook Return of the Shadow; History of the LOTR Part One download

by Tolkien J.R.R.

eBook Return of the Shadow; History of the LOTR Part One download ISBN: 0044401620
Author: Tolkien J.R.R.
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin; New Ed edition (1988)
Language: English
Pages: 480
ePub: 1159 kb
Fb2: 1214 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf lit lrf azw
Category: Pseudoscience
Subcategory: Fantasy

Let me admit first off that The Return of the Shadow (book 6 in the History of Middle-earth series) is exactly what I didn’t want to read when I first heard that Christopher Tolkien was putting out a series of books of his father’s unpublished writings. It is often assumed that the LoTR was the centre of the professor’s literary work, that The Hobbit was always an early prequel to it, and that The Silmarillion was a collection of early and/or unfinished material thrown together after the success of LoTR in the hopes of cashing in on that success.

In this sixth volume of The History of Middle-earth the story reaches The Lord of. .

In this sixth volume of The History of Middle-earth the story reaches The Lord of the Rings. In The Return of the Shadow (an abandoned title for the first volume) Christopher Tolkien describes. The only warning, once I read this, the world of Middle Earth was harder for me to enter with suspended disbelief. Parts of the book can be tedious if you’re not particularly interested in maps, coordinating dates, or reading three versions of a scene in a row.

The story in this book ends at the point where . Tolkien halted in the story for a long time, as the Company of the Ring, still lacking Legolas and Gimli, stood before the tomb of Balin in the Mines of Moria. The Return of the Shadow is illustrated with reproductions of the first maps and notable pages from the earliest manuscripts. Скачать (pdf, . 1 Mb) Читать. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

The Return of the Shadow (1988) is the sixth volume of Christopher Tolkien's series The History of Middle-earth. The book begins with the initial compositions of . Tolkien's early Lord of the Rings drafts, and goes through to the episode in the Mines of Moria.

Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco Los Gatos Library Cathedral City Historical Society Palo Alto Historical Association Monterey Peninsula College Western Sonoma County Historical Society Placer County Museums Division.

Of the thrilling and informative History of Middle-Earth series, this is perhaps the most interesting part. A great book for LOTR fans. com User, September 26, 1998

Of the thrilling and informative History of Middle-Earth series, this is perhaps the most interesting part. Normal Tolkien fans will get the rare chance to see how the germ of an idea can explode into the most complex cosmology ever created. Although it may seem boring, as it is not a novel per se, it is an insightful analysis of a very beloved book. com User, September 26, 1998. In the sixth volume of The History of Middle Earth, Christopher Tolkien begins to show us the developement of The Lord of the Rings. This volume reaches the point where Tolkien himself stopped his writing for a long time-the Mines of Moria.

part 3 The Lord of the Rings series. Drawn up within the shadow of the Gate and under the looming walls outside they had waited for his signal: all the mounted men that were left in the City. Yet now under the Lord of Barad-dur the most fell of all his captains is already master of your outer walls,' said Gandalf. King of Angmar long ago, Sorcerer, Ringwraith, Lord of the Nazgûl, a spear of terror in the hand of Sauron, shadow of despair. Then, Mithrandir, you had a foe to match you,' said Denethor. For myself, I have long known who is the chief captain of the hosts of the Dark Tower. Now they sprang forward, formed, quickened to a gallop, and charged with a great shout.

The History of The Lord of the Rings is a four-volume work by Christopher Tolkien published between 1988 and 1992 that documents the process of J. R. Tolkien's writing of The Lord of the Rings

The History of The Lord of the Rings is a four-volume work by Christopher Tolkien published between 1988 and 1992 that documents the process of J. Tolkien's writing of The Lord of the Rings. The History is also numbered as volumes six to nine of The History of Middle-earth ("HoME", as below). Some information concerning the appendices and a soon-abandoned sequel to the novel can also be found in volume twelve, The Peoples of Middle-earth.

In the Hobbit or the Lord of the Rings, you don't learn too much about him, but in the Appendices and the Silmarillion we find a lot of small background story about the Dark Lord and learn about his lore from the LotR books and the Silmarillion, which explains why he gave Aragorn, Gandalf.

In the Hobbit or the Lord of the Rings, you don't learn too much about him, but in the Appendices and the Silmarillion we find a lot of small background story about the Dark Lord and learn about his lore from the LotR books and the Silmarillion, which explains why he gave Aragorn, Gandalf, Fordo, Sam, Gimli and the others so much. trouble with his One Ring. Notes: - I pronounce names as Tolkien described it (so a rolled R) - This video contains spoilers - The books are my main source - There are some mistakes in the video.

The events of Lord of the Rings (LoTR) cover only a minuscule part of the whole Silmarillion timeline. If you are looking books by . R Tolkien then the books are The Hobbit The Silmarillion Unfinished Tales The children of Hurin If you are looking for books written in Middle-Earth then there is 12-volume set published by . R Tolkien's son called The History of Middle Earth (HoME). The set is a vast collection of stories which . R Tolkien left as drafts. These also contain a few extras in LoTR. 1k views · View 3 Upvoters.

Comments: (7)
Alien
How often do fans get to read draft versions of a favorite saga, glimpsing which elements were present from the beginning, how the story evolved, and various alternatives that were considered? For fans who relish such details, this is a book for you!

Tolkien did not know at the outset what his story would be, but just began writing. Although he made numerous revisions to people and events, he stayed within the same framework rather than create something entirely new. Hence, the protagonists remained hobbits, the story opened with the birthday party, the hobbits leave the Shire, they arrive in Bree and meet a helpful stranger, they are pursued, and arrive in Rivendell. Tolkien foresaw the journey to Orodruin, that Gollum would play a role, and that the Shire would suffer, but did not yet Lothlorien, Saruman, Rohan or Gondor. Treebeard was originally envisaged as an enemy and the character who would become Strider/Aragorn as a hobbit ranger named Trotter.

The bulk of Return of the Shadow follows the rewrites of various events from the Birthday party to the arrival in Rivendell. Some of the differences are minor, others more significant. The final two chapters focus on the failed attempt to cross the mountains and the entry into Moria. At this point, the party consisted of Gandalf, the shire hobbits, Trotter, and Boromir, although we see that Tolkien considered adding a dwarf and elf.

Throughout the book, Christopher Tolkien adds his comments about the drafts and the story. It’s amazing enough that Tolkien saved his original material, even those scribbled on scraps of paper, but Christopher’s painstaking work organizing the versions, trying to figure out the order of writing, and deciphering script that was barely legible (in some cases, pencil with a different version overwritten in ink) is truly herculean. He notes discrepancies in maps and chronology, clarifies statements and passages, even admits when he doesn’t know what his father was thinking. What he does not do is describe any philosophical outlook or response to life events that influenced his tale or Middle Earth. You will need to look elsewhere for such an analysis.

Parts of the book can be tedious if you’re not particularly interested in maps, coordinating dates, or reading three versions of a scene in a row. But if you are keen to observe the process of creation that resulted in Lord of the Rings, you will find this book fascinating.
melody of you
The best and most accurate description of this series is a history of WRITING of the Lord of the Rings. It contains Tolkien's numerous revisions of the book before the final, settled account came out. For example, Frodo Baggins in a couple of early drafts presented in this book was named Bingo... Die-hard LOTR fans are saying, yeah, so what?

The book is good for seeing the development of the story, but I hoped to find stories on more the background of Middle Earth itself, even more than in the Silmarrillon and other later additions to the history of Middle Earth. The fall of Numenor would make tremendous reading, wouldn't it? That tale is not in these books though. It is no fault Christopher Tolkien or his father that the tales don't appear. It does give you the feeling that LOTR was one vein in a tremendous gold mine of writing and that the mother-lode is still untapped.
Stonewing
I like reading these books but I don't think very many others will. And I'm starting to get burned out on them. Previously I got the paperback edition of the first 5 books of this series. In the very first book there is a new story and it's a pretty good one. Some of the old stories are introduced to a traveler in the olden days. It's actually very interesting. But then it gets tedious.
What is happening here is that JRR Tolkiens son Christopher went through all his Dads old papers to put these books together to show how JRR went about the process of writing Lord of the Rings. This volume and the next deal with Fellowship of the Ring. The story line you read sticks to the Fellowship line but it's different. This book shows the steps of character development. Ideas coming and going. Editing and rewrites. In short, to some folks this would be intensely boring. But I liked this book and I'm about half way through the next one, The Treason of Isengard. It's the same thing, the Fellowship story. Parts of what you read go from ideas that appeared in the Silmarillion to the end of tale of the Rings. Christopher Tolkien must have loved his father very much because he's put together an analytical series of books that leaves no comment untold, no idea unrevealed.
elegant stranger
Tolkien should be knighted by the british govt! this he deserves,a ld war one officer, a great father and a great writer a great mind who conceved rd of the rings and the hobbit,,its a sad day when he isn't recognized and people like jagger are, what an insult to humanity!
Kelenn
This book is for hard core Tolkien fans. Many people would find this book tedious and boring but I find it very interesting. Christopher Tolkien does over explain and analyze at times but I like that. It is like reading several versions of Lord of the Rings by the same author and I love it!