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eBook Dreadful Sancturary download

by E.F. Russell

eBook Dreadful Sancturary download ISBN: 0749300736
Author: E.F. Russell
Publisher: Arrow (A Division of Random House Group); New edition edition (July 6, 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 255
ePub: 1381 kb
Fb2: 1696 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: txt mbr lrf mobi
Category: Pseudoscience

Dreadful Sanctuary book

Dreadful Sanctuary book.

Eric Frank Russell (January 6, 1905 – February 28, 1978) was a British author best known for his science fiction novels and short stories. Much of his work was first published in the United States, in John W. Campbell's Astounding Science Fiction and other pulp magazines. Russell also wrote horror fiction for Weird Tales and non-fiction articles on Fortean topics. Up to 1955 several of his stories were published under pseudonyms, at least Duncan H. Munro and Niall(e) Wilde.

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In Dreadful Sanctuary, Russell entertains a similar idea. The human race is again being manipulated. The primary weakness of Dreadful Sanctuary is its style, which seems overly pulpish by today's standards. Not by aliens this time, but by a group of super humans known as the Norman Club. Here are some samples, culled at random: "He was deader than last month's bottles" (8); "So you want to make sure Quinn gets back with all the dingbats and the stupendous epic?"

Dreadful Sanctuary is a science fiction novel by British author Eric Frank Russell.

Dreadful Sanctuary is a science fiction novel by British author Eric Frank Russell.

1948) A novel by Eric Frank Russell. Man's fight to conquer space - and space's fight to resist that conquest. July 1989 : UK Paperback.

Dreadful Sanctuary (Lancer SF, 72-149). by Eric Frank Russell. Select Format: Paperback. 16 unmanned rockets had exploded, then the 17th, manned. What would happen to the 18th? There was an invisible menace in space.

Mass Market Paperback in good condition. Heavy rubbing to the covers, tightly bound, squared, with the previous owner's name written on the front free end paper. Dreadful Sanctuary is a fine example of Russell's ability to handle excitement and high adventure. Other Products from bytownbookery (View All). World That Couldn't Be And 8 Other Novelets From "Galaxy", By H. L. Gold.

Published by Four Square Books/ New English Library, London. Dreadful Sanctuary is a science fiction novel by British author Eric Frank Russell. After its serialisation in the American magazine Astounding Science Fiction in 1948, it was first published in book form in 1951 by Fantasy Press. Author: Eric Frank Russell. Approx dims: 180mm h x 110mm w x 20mm d. Intact slightly sunned condition covers with slight creasing and rubbing to edges and corners, plus some signs of handling. Man’s fight to conquer space – and space’s fight to resist that conquest.

Главная Dreadful Sanctuary. org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

1st Mandarin 1989 edition paperback vg book In stock shipped from our UK warehouse
Comments: (3)
Uleran
This was a very enjoyable story, which kept me guessing as to which group of characters were telling the truth! I STRONGLY recommend that anyone interested in Dreadful Sanctuary only read this original (1951) version of the story. The later editions have a different ending, which an editor forced Russell to make, and the story suffers greatly because of it.
Lamranilv
I am a fan of Eric Frank Russell's stories. This was one of his best in the magazine version. Unfortunately, for some unknown reason, he rewrote the ending for the book version, and he spoiled the story. I recommend that you try to find the magazine version -- you'll like it. And you will be surprised by its clever ending. (I would give the magazine version 5 stars.)
lifestyle
The writings of Charles Fort provided inspiration for a number of science fiction writers to spin out some of their stories and novels. Robert A. Heinlein, H. Beam Piper, Damon Knight, Avram Davidson-- all wrote the occasional off-trail Fortean story from time to time.* But the science fiction writer who was arguably the most fascinated with Fort was Eric Frank Russell. His first novel, _Sinister Barrier_ (_Unknown_, 1939; 1943), played with the idea that the human race might be property-- cattle managed and controlled by powerful aliens.

In _Dreadful Sanctuary_, Russell entertains a similar idea. The human race is again being manipulated. Not by aliens this time, but by a group of super humans known as the Norman Club. The Normans claim that they are virtually the only sane people on Earth... and that they would like to keep it that way. The hero of the story finds himself pitted against them.

Perhaps this would be an appropriate place to discuss the different versions of the novel. The earliest version was a three-part serial that ran in _Astounding_ in 1948. The first book edition was published in 1951. My edition is the Lancer edition of 1961, which I assume is essentially the same as the Fantasy House hardback. The _Astounding_ serial closely matches the book-- for the first two thirds of the novel. But the last third of the serial and the book differ drastically from one another. The ending to the book is much more hard-boiled and downbeat.

I know that a number of readers champion the original serial. And if I were making a movie of the novel, that is the version that I would use. It is the more entertaining of the two. But it strikes me that Russell displayed a certain amount of courage in revising his ending in the manner that he did. It was not the sort of story that many mainstream sf writers did in the early fifties. But it is logical. And it does have emotional punch.

The primary weakness of _Dreadful Sanctuary_ is its style, which seems overly pulpish by today's standards. Here are some samples, culled at random: "He was deader than last month's bottles" (8); "So you want to make sure Quinn gets back with all the dingbats and the stupendous epic?" (9); "If she condescends to listen to a wolf whistle, it's solely to study the Doppler effect" (10); "If you want to play Sherlock, I'll stooge along" (15); "If these tomes cunningly had been chosen to suit the situation, he'd best lay off them" (64); "They made him as ready for the roasting as any turkey on a spit" (69); "Came the sharp click of a closing door and three men entered Armstrong's field of vision as he slowly twisted his head around" (87). Russell sometimes gets away with an informal style in his stories. But it doesn't work in this novel, and it prevents me from giving it a top rating.

The basic story-- which involves a series of seventeen rockets to Venus that have all exploded-- may seem a bit dated to modern readers. Nowadays, we have been into space with manned ships and robot probes. We have landed on the Moon. We have probed other planets. But before we get too uppity, we might do well to remember that the question posed by Normans may still apply to us: "How do you know you are sane?"

* One writer who did _not_ do so was H.G. Wells. Theodore Dreiser, a friend of Fort's, kept trying to interest Wells in such a project. But Wells believed that Fort's writing was mostly nonsense. He was never tempted to write such a tale.
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