carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Scurvy: How a Surgeon, a Mariner and a Gentleman Solved the Greatest Medical Mystery of the Age of Sail

eBook Scurvy: How a Surgeon, a Mariner and a Gentleman Solved the Greatest Medical Mystery of the Age of Sail download

by Stephen R. Bown

eBook Scurvy: How a Surgeon, a Mariner and a Gentleman Solved the Greatest Medical Mystery of the Age of Sail download ISBN: 0143002643
Author: Stephen R. Bown
Publisher: Penguin (2004)
Language: English
ePub: 1606 kb
Fb2: 1901 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mobi docx lrf txt
Category: Political
Subcategory: Sociology

The first two chapters created a gruesome backstory of the Age of Sail. It was incredibly interesting to read about the awful conditions that sailors were forced into

The first two chapters created a gruesome backstory of the Age of Sail. It was incredibly interesting to read about the awful conditions that sailors were forced into. The book gave a graphic description of what advanced scurvy actually did to sailors and how quickly it spread through almost all ships. The rest of the book was just how scurvy was unraveled and understood.

In Scurvy, Stephen R. Bown chooses, in a smart but often sensational tone and with no sparing of the blood, guts, and glory of the high seas, to focus on four men: George Anson (whose 1740 voyage brought the ravages of scurvy into the public eye), surgeon James Lind, explorer James. Bown chooses, in a smart but often sensational tone and with no sparing of the blood, guts, and glory of the high seas, to focus on four men: George Anson (whose 1740 voyage brought the ravages of scurvy into the public eye), surgeon James Lind, explorer James Cook, and the young, aristocratic physician Gilbert Blane. A deft historian, Bown weaves the influence of scurvy into the telling of Napoleon’s defeat by the Spanish Armada, and, directing a few less-than-subtle jabs at Dava Sobel, author of the best-selling Longitude, Bown champions the citrus-based cure for scurvy over the determination of longitude in terms of historical importance.

Scurvy took a terrible toll in the Age of Sail, killing more sailors than were lost in all sea battles combined. The threat of the disease kept ships close to home and doomed those vessels that ventured too far from port. The willful ignorance of the royal medical elite. Although the book, including epilogue, is only 217 pages, it actually could have been even more condensed as Brown repeats information a lot. Just when a point seems thoroughly covered, he'll explain it again. Sometimes the story gets bogged down by conjecture, particularly when it was discussed why wort of malt continued to be recommended as a cure (pp. 167-69). The threat of the disease kept ships close to home and doomed those vessels that ventured too far from port

oceedings{Bown2003ScurvyH, title {Scurvy : How a Surgeon, a Mariner and a Gentleman Solved . Surgeon James Lind, Captain James Cook and physician Sir Gilbert Blane undertook to solve the riddle of Scurvy

oceedings{Bown2003ScurvyH, title {Scurvy : How a Surgeon, a Mariner and a Gentleman Solved the Greatest Medical Mystery of the Age of Sail}, author {Stephen R. Bown}, year {2003} }. Stephen R. Bown. In the days of tall ships, one dreaded foe was responsible for more deaths at sea than piracy, shipwreck and all other illnesses combined: Scurvy. Surgeon James Lind, Captain James Cook and physician Sir Gilbert Blane undertook to solve the riddle of Scurvy. Their achievements heralded a new age and cracked the greatest medical mystery of the Age of Sail. View PDF. Save to Library.

Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee: An Indian History of the American Westpic. 14. A Kingdom Strange: The Brief and Tragic History of the Lost Colony of Roanokepic.

Электронная книга "Scurvy: How a Surgeon, a Mariner, and a Gentlemen Solved the Greatest Medical Mystery of the Age of Sail", Stephen R. Bown

Электронная книга "Scurvy: How a Surgeon, a Mariner, and a Gentlemen Solved the Greatest Medical Mystery of the Age of Sail", Stephen R. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Scurvy: How a Surgeon, a Mariner, and a Gentlemen Solved the Greatest Medical Mystery of the Age of Sail" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Brown, Stephen R. Scurvy: How a Surgeon, a Mariner, and a Gentleman Solved the Greatest Medical Mystery of the Age of Sail. Markham, On. Thomas Allen, 2003. Five warships and one sloop began the journey, but only one ship returned. Scurvy had felled so many men that ships had had to be scuttled and abandoned for lack of sufficient crews. Scurvy took a terrible toll in the Age of Sail, killing more sailors than were lost in all sea battles combined.

Comments: (7)
Thozius
It was the fortuitous Gentleman who made all the difference, a lucky stroke quite outside frozen British bureaucracy, and this is a great read. The history of the dogmatic thinking within the British Medical community is revealed here and to our modern minds, trained at least a little in the scientific methods, it's agonizing to read influential Doctors layout their favorite theory about the cause or cure for Scurvy, citing no evidence whatsoever. How many thousands of British Sailors suffered badly and died from their lack of interest in the well-being of their staff. This reminded me of the same British stubbornness having to do with exploration of the South Pole, during the late 1800s and early 1900s, when the leading lights of the day in England deliberately choosing to ignore the latest advances in Polar Exploration technology, using Eskimo dogs and skis for snow-journeys, by the Norwegians, as documented in The Last Place on Earth by Roland Huntford. Speaking of which....this a very enjoyable, well-written book, which states that by 1799 it was official British Naval policy that all British Sailors and the hired help on long journeys MUST have 8 oz. of lemon juice every day, and this was accepted as preventing and curing Scurvy. Then why does Robert Falcon Scott, a hundred years later, NOT know about this and takes NO preventative measures, and, Scurvy becomes one of the many factors, including having feet with frostbite and gangrene, that contributed to the death of all five summit members, and, friends and family afterwards purposely omitted passages from his own diary, before publishing Scott's book, which indicated that he did not pay attention to prevention or treatment of Scurvy, and as Captain of the ship he was ultimately responsible. A few generations later and the whole story came out, but I'm puzzled.....as a British Navy Officer, how did he not know about this "official policy" issued Navy-wide in 1796? I was hoping to find an answer to that question by ordering this book, and this was not addressed, so the mystery remains unsolved, nonetheless, I found this story to be a very enjoyable read.
Weernis
Contains a great deal of medical and nautical history in a very palatable format...The hideous conditions on sailing ships (not the halcyon noble existence suggested by majestic artwork). Entire fleets lost to disease. How cures were found then lost to social, scientific, and political hierarchy. History not on History Channel or in general curricula. History you won't find elsewhere unless you are specifically a student of nautical history and medical science of the era...very interesting and informative read or listen...
Jonariara
This is an informative, interesting history of scurry's discovery and treatment. The "discovery" of vitamin C as both a prophylactic and cure is clearly explained. As such, it is an excellent teaching aid for those interested in learning
about and teaching scientific methods. The control and experimental conditions (ships on which vitamin C was not made
available vs. those on which C was available) are memorable and accurate.

Moreover, the narration is clear, varied, and entertaining. Overall, an excellent audiobook.
Orevise
During the Age of Sail from the time of Columbus to the steam era of the mid 19th century, scurvy was the biggest killer of men at sea, being responsible for more deaths than storms, ship wrecks, combat, and all other diseases combined. It presented a slow and agonizing death to those afflicted. It caused the degeneration of connective tissues that led to wobbly teeth, the resurfacing of old wounds and injuries, and weakness and lethargy that doom the sailor to find his resting place and await his demise. Stephen Brown's book covers the effects of scurvy on the sailor as well as on history and the long process that led to the disease finally being conquered.

Scurvy is caused by a diet deficiency of Vitamin C found mainly in ascorbic fresh fruits and vegetables (lemons being high in ascorbic acid). The maddening part about the history of scurvy, as Brown explains, is how the use of fresh fruits and vegetables had been used stave off the disease various times (even back in the 1500s) but they were not adopted as an official cure. The reasons that prevented the official acknowledgment of the true cure for scurvy are many but, in part, the delays were due to a lack of controlled studies and a clinical approach to medical research, the habit of overcrowding ships with men in anticipation of replacing the dead instead of preventing the disease, disinterest in finding a cure during certain periods of time, and politics that favored certain alleged cures (i.e. wort of malt) that actually had no effect on the disease.

Brown looks at the works of surgeon James Lind, the famous Captain James Cook, and Gilbert Blane, a physician of high social-standing, to present his story on how the medical mystery of scurvy was finally solved. The author explains the importance of the disease on world events, particularly on the American Revolution and the defeat of Napoleon.

Although the book, including epilogue, is only 217 pages, it actually could have been even more condensed as Brown repeats information a lot. Just when a point seems thoroughly covered, he'll explain it again. Sometimes the story gets bogged down by conjecture, particularly when it was discussed why wort of malt continued to be recommended as a cure (pp. 167-69).

Despite the repetition, the book is informative and well-researched. It includes illustrations, an extensive bibliography, source notes, time line, index, and an appendix which lists the amount of Vitamin C found in certain foods commonly consumed during the age of sail. This appendix is a very interesting and useful addition to the book.
Dorintrius
the historical aspects of health and its impact on our world is tied together wonderfully in this tome. scurvy is largely forgotten but limited human progress for centuries. the fits and starts of medical discovery,the human element (some good ,some less pleasant ) is included elegantly. the ultimately simplicity of the solution,its application today and the link to vitamin c are very well done. outlining the amount of vitamin c needed to avoid scurvy,the link to pretrip nutritional status, and the content of vitamin c in fruits/vegetables today were also engaging