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eBook The Problem of Slavery as History: A Global Approach (The David Brion Davis Series) download

by Joseph C. Miller

eBook The Problem of Slavery as History: A Global Approach (The David Brion Davis Series) download ISBN: 0300113153
Author: Joseph C. Miller
Publisher: Yale University Press (December 31, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1633 kb
Fb2: 1815 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mobi mbr txt azw
Category: Political
Subcategory: Sociology

Joseph C. Miller turns this classic question on its head by rethinking the very nature of slavery. Ambitious, incisive, and poetic, The Problem of Slavery as History challenges us to rethink our understanding of African, Atlantic and global history

Joseph C. Ambitious, incisive, and poetic, The Problem of Slavery as History challenges us to rethink our understanding of African, Atlantic and global history. At once a remarkable journey through the past and a manifesto for the future, it is a must-read for all those invested in the work of history. Laurent Dubois, author of Haiti: The Aftershocks of History. A provocative and deeply informed effort to historicize slavery as an evolving practice that has nevertheless remained integral to almost every society in human history.

The David Brion Davis Series

The David Brion Davis Series. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2012. Miller recasts the world history of slavery as a means for marginalized insiders to appropriate outsiders and mobilize them in the slavers' competition with predominant elites.

Joseph C. Miller turns this classic question on its head by rethinking the very nature of slavery, arguing that it must be viewed generally as a process rather than as an institution. Tracing the global history of slaving over thousands of years, Miller reveals the shortcomings of Western narratives that define slavery by the same structures and power relations regardless of places and times, concluding instead that slaving is a process which can be understood fully only as imbedded in changing circumstances.

The David Brion Davis Series. Breathtaking in its erudition, The Problem of Slavery as History speaks forcefully to the canon of slavery scholarship. Joseph C.

David Brion Davis (February 16, 1927 – April 14, 2019) was an American intellectual and cultural historian, and a leading authority on slavery and abolition in the Western world. He was a Sterling Professor of History at Yale University, and founder. He was a Sterling Professor of History at Yale University, and founder and director of Yale's Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition.

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History at Yale University and President of the Organization of American Historians. Winner of the Bancroft Prize, the National Book Award, and the Beveridge Award of the . he is the author of several books, including Slavery and Human Progress and The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution.

The Problem of Slavery as History: A Global Approach, by Joseph C. Miller. Download with Google. The Problem of Slavery as History: A Global Approach, by Joseph C.

Miller, Joseph Calder. David Brion Davis series. Slavery and manumission British policy in the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf in the first half of the 20th century, by: Zdanowski, Jerzy. Corporate Authors: ProQuest (Firm). Subjects: Slavery Historiography. Children in slavery through the ages Published: (2009).

Tracing the global history of slaving over thousands of years, Miller reveals the shortcomings of Western narratives that .

Tracing the global history of slaving over thousands of years, Miller reveals the shortcomings of Western narratives that define slavery by the same structures and power relations regardless of places and times, concluding instead that slaving is a process which can be understood fully only as imbedded in changing circumstances.

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I have long interpreted the problem of slavery as centering on the impossibility of converting humans into the totally compliant, submissive, accepting chattels symbolized by Aristotle’s ideal of the natural slave.

Why did slavery—an accepted evil for thousands of years—suddenly become regarded during the eighteenth century as an abomination so compelling that Western governments took up the cause of abolition in ways that transformed the modern world? Joseph C. Miller turns this classic question on its head by rethinking the very nature of slavery, arguing that it must be viewed generally as a process rather than as an institution. Tracing the global history of slaving over thousands of years, Miller reveals the shortcomings of Western narratives that define slavery by the same structures and power relations regardless of places and times, concluding instead that slaving is a process which can be understood fully only as imbedded in changing circumstances.