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eBook Buried in the Bitter Waters: The Hidden History of Racial Cleansing in America download

by Elliot Jaspin

eBook Buried in the Bitter Waters: The Hidden History of Racial Cleansing in America download ISBN: 0465036376
Author: Elliot Jaspin
Publisher: Basic Books; 58902nd edition (May 6, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 352
ePub: 1178 kb
Fb2: 1308 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: doc docx mbr lit
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Buried in the Bitter Wate. has been added to your Cart. Excellent book for the surpressed history of "cleansing" in my region, mostly going back to the forced removal of African Americans from counties in Georgia and North Carolina.

Buried in the Bitter Wate. Not a single thing in this.

Jaspin exposes a shocking history of racial cleansing in the United States, and one that, alarmingly, continues to. .com User, September 9, 2008.

Jaspin exposes a shocking history of racial cleansing in the United States, and one that, alarmingly, continues to effect the geography of race in America to this. Buried in the Bitter Waters," a look at American ethnic cleansing is inevitably comparable to James Loewen's (slightly) earlier book on the subject, "Sundown Towns. Of the two, I like this one better as Loewen's book, while excellent and informative, is a bit too heavy on the sociology and academia for my liking. This is a bit more layman-friendly.

Detailed digging into censu "Buried in the Bitter Waters" is a book describing forced removal of blacks in a.

Detailed digging into censu "Buried in the Bitter Waters" is a book describing forced removal of blacks in a number of areas of the . around the turn of the (20th) Century. It's a story I hadn't heard of in my exposure to . History, although most of us have heard related stories of forced removal of Native Americans from Indian lands during the 19th Century. Despite having read many books about inequality, this book was novel for me because its focus was not simply a book about the inequality present in todays society or a survey of the practices in slavery and Jim Crow that resulted in lasting patterns of inequality.

The Hidden History of Racial Cleansing in America

The Hidden History of Racial Cleansing in America. Many of these counties remain virtually all-white to this day. In Buried in the Bitter Waters, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Elliot Jaspin exposes a deeply shameful chapter in the nation's history-and one that continues to shape the geography of race in America.

In his book, Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America, author Patrick Phillips describes in graphic detail how white .

In his book, Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America, author Patrick Phillips describes in graphic detail how white people in Forsyth. Audiobooks from Audible – Windows Apps on Microsoft Store.

A new book, Buried in the Bitter Waters, describes this oft-forgotten history of racial cleansing. In Buried in the Bitter Waters, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Elliot Jaspin writes about racial cleansings from Central Texas through Georgia. Between the Civil War and the 1920s, in Corbin and many other American towns, whites forcefully expelled virtually all blacks from their communities. In a sense, it's become America's family secret," Jaspin says. Today, many of Corbin's residents are told a different version of what happened in 1919 - a more benign story in which black workers were forced out not because of their race but because they were causing trouble.

The Hidden History of Racial Cleansing in America. Narrated by: Don Leslie. Length: 10 hrs and 44 mins.

“Leave now, or die!” Those words-or ones just as ominous-have echoed through the past hundred years of American history, heralding a very unnatural disaster-a wave of racial cleansing that wiped out or drove away black populations from counties across the nation. While we have long known about horrific episodes of lynching in the South, this story of racial cleansing has remained almost entirely unknown. These expulsions, always swift and often violent, were extraordinarily widespread in the period between Reconstruction and the Depression era. In the heart of the Midwest and the Deep South, whites rose up in rage, fear, and resentment to lash out at local blacks. They burned and killed indiscriminately, sweeping entire counties clear of blacks to make them racially “pure.” Many of these counties remain virtually all-white to this day. In Buried in the Bitter Waters, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Elliot Jaspin exposes a deeply shameful chapter in the nation's history-and one that continues to shape the geography of race in America.
Comments: (7)
Άνουβις
This is the story of twelve (of approximately 1,800 incidents) of blacks being driven out of communities shared with whites (mostly between the years of 1876-1923), and having their land and possessions taken over by white vigilantes. Although the majority of the incidents were centered in the South -- primarily Georgia and Florida -- occurrences also were reported as far north as Indiana and Missouri. The upshot of a finely researched book is that the communities that were "ethnically cleansed" remain lily white even today, but with no memory of why they are that way?

The stories are all so similar in form that these twelve examples serve adequately as a representative of the many others: Whites established a pretext -- almost always based in a fear of black competition in the labor market, or on some variation of racial mythology, the subtext of which invariably reduced to imagined sexual threats from black men. In every instance, these imagined threats were stoked into hot tribal flames which were then used to threaten and cajole blacks into leaving the communities, cities and counties completely. Their lands and possessions were then taken over by the very vigilantes that had run them out.

Faced after the fact with an inconvenient history, white tribes also had a standard conscience soothing repertory of moral defenses for their collective perfidy. The first and most used defense was the cowardly use of silence. Since the winners get to define history, and "ethnic cleansing" was nothing to be proud of -- not only because it was criminal but also because it was morally reprehensible -- why mention it ever again? Therefore the first line of defense was a combination of silence and willfully strategic forgetfulness.

Failing this, "blaming the victim" was the next best line of defense. It was the old "blacks brought in all upon themselves defense." The final defense -- denial that the ethnic cleansing had taken place at all -- was perhaps the best of all because if whites could claim that it never happened, history is then permanently edited and blacks certainly can make no claims for reparation for events that did not happen, now can they? Plus nothing was worse than having to repay blacks for the land and goods stolen from them.

So, in summary, what we get here is the restoration of the history of yet another pattern of strategically forgotten and collectively mis-remembered American history about race. And sadly, we also get another firmly established but very well hidden pattern of white racism, the pogrom, to add to slavery, genocide and Jim Crow. The book thus brings into the light of day another sad chapter in the white inability to deal with race, and thus underscores the fact that America still remains a nation divided, physically, socially, economically, and in its history, by race. Kudos to the author for very imaginative computerized use of U.S. census statistics. Five stars
Blackseeker
A shocking but not surprising analysis of the ethnic cleansing throughout American history experienced by African Americans. We don't talk about it; we don't teach it; we don't acknowledge it. This book forces us to look at our past...and fear for America's future.
Madis
Mr. Jaspin is not unlike that one great-uncle, there's one in every family, who, no matter how young you are, nor how unsettling the story is, can be counted on to tell you the dispassionate, the reasoned, the unvarnished truth.

Regardless of familial-censure, of possible shunning, or of the unspoken rules of cover-up, i.e.: denial, silence and deliberate amnesia. Inchoate, yet hard rules which keep the family dysfunctional, repressed. And which rules are sustained by the rest of the family out of duty, habit, stupidity.

The author does every American a grand service. Even an Altanta newspaper which preferred to duck.
Fhois
An incredible read. Not a single thing in this book for any American to be proud of.
Budar
I was channel hopping and came across a PBS independent file "Banished" and was quite surprised when the 1st place they mentioned was Washington County, Indiana, where I am orginally from and where my family still is. I was curious, so I did a search on Amazon and came across this book. Again, 1st thing mentioned, Washington County, Indiana. Then, later on in the book I came across Laurel County, Kentucky, where my maternal grandmother's people are from! I never thought I could be so ashamed of where I came from. It hurts to read this book, that people can be so ignorant and cruel.

I definitely suggest reading this. As I mentioned, it hurts, but we all should know our history, and hopefully quit repeating it.
Irostamore
I do not love the content of this book but felt compelled to read it. I which everyone would read it. It helps me to understand why we have the racial problems we gave today.
Uleran
Excellent book for the surpressed history of "cleansing" in my region, mostly going back to the forced removal of African Americans from counties in Georgia and North Carolina.
Every African descended person in America who feels they have been assimilated into American society really needs to just read a chapter or two of this writing. All myths will be dispelled .