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eBook The Street: A Novel download

by Ann Petry

eBook The Street: A Novel download ISBN: 0395901499
Author: Ann Petry
Publisher: Mariner Books; unknown edition (March 15, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 435
ePub: 1833 kb
Fb2: 1982 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: txt azw doc docx
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Ann Petry’s first novel, The Street, was a literary event in 1946, praised and translated around the world - the first book by a black woman to sell more than a million copies. It’s the story of a catastrophe in agonizingly slow motion

Ann Petry’s first novel, The Street, was a literary event in 1946, praised and translated around the world - the first book by a black woman to sell more than a million copies. It’s the story of a catastrophe in agonizingly slow motion. A mother and her young son living in Harlem in the 1940s are ground down by poverty and the bitter racism and constant predation in their neglected neighborhood. Streets like the one she lived on were no accident. They were the North’s lynch mobs, the mother, Lutie, thinks. The method the big cities used to keep Negroes in their place.

Ann Petry, the woman, had it all, and so does her insightful, prescient and unputdownable . LOA books are distributed worldwide by Penguin Random House. N° 314 Library of America Series.

Ann Petry, the woman, had it all, and so does her insightful, prescient and unputdownable prose. Tayari Jones, The New York Times. Both novels, as Coretta Scott King once said of The Street, are uncompromising work of social criticism that reveal the devastating impact of racial injustice. They are also impossible to put down: full of characters, to borrow Petry’s words, as real as one’s next-door-neighbor, predictable and yet unpredictable, lingering in the memory, in situations as powerfully pertinent today as when they were first written.

In her novel, Petry uses personification in the interest of establishing a relationship between the setting and Lutie Johnson. At the end of the third paragraph, the wind is described ‘assaulting’ people on the street, the wind grabbed their hats, pried their scarves from around their necks, stuck its fingers inside their coat collars, blew their coats away from their bodies. Lines 31-34) Personifying the wind as having fingers is enough to create a tense and eerie tone.

Ann Petry's first novel, The Street, was a literary event in 1946, praised and translated around the world - the first book by a black woman to sell more than a million copies. Her work endures not merely because of the strength of its message but its artistry' NEW YORK TIMES. insightful, prescient and unputdownable' TAYARI JONES.

14 best poetry books. Poetry is powerful, inspiring and good for the soul. Carol Ann Duffy was appointed poet laureate in 2009 and this collection was published two years later. To mark National Poetry Day, we've picked our favourite collections of poetry from Larkin to Wordsworth. Emma Lee-Potter LeePotter. Many schools get their pupils to learn poems by heart in the hope that children will develop a lifelong enthusiasm for poetry, and some people continue the habit throughout their lives. In it she includes drinking songs, love poems, political poems and the moving Last Post, written for the last surviving soldiers to fight in the 1914-1918 war.

Ann Petry (originally Ann Lane) was raised in Old Saybrook, Connecticut, and grew up. .Her observations inspired her to begin working on her first novel. The Street is the story of Lutie Johnson, a single black mother living in World War II-era Harlem with her 8-year-old son, Bub.

Ann Petry (originally Ann Lane) was raised in Old Saybrook, Connecticut, and grew up as part of a middle-class black family. Her father, a pharmacist, and her mother, a podiatrist, provided a relatively sheltered life for Ann and her siblings. In 1943, she applied for the Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship by submitting the first few chapters of The Street, and won the award. The fellowship, which came with a handsome cash award, allowed her to finish the novel.

The Street is a novel published in 1946 by African-American writer Ann Petry. Set in World War II era Harlem, it centers on the life of Lutie Johnson

The Street is a novel published in 1946 by African-American writer Ann Petry. Set in World War II era Harlem, it centers on the life of Lutie Johnson.

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. THE STREET tells the poignant, often heartbreaking story of Lutie Johnson, a young black woman. Australian Authors Reading Online Thing 1 Fiction And Nonfiction Classic Literature Famous Novels American Women Black Authors Book Nooks. Don't judge a book by its cover essay pdf The tools you need to write a quality essay or.

Ann Petry (October 12, 1908 – April 28, 1997) was an American author who became the first black woman writer with book sales topping a million copies for her novel The Street. She turned up in college and graduated with a P.

The Street, naturalistic novel by Ann Petry, published in 1946, that was one of the first novels by an African American woman to receive widespread critical acclaim. Set in Long Island, New York, in suburban Connecticut, and in Harlem, The Street is the story of intelligent, ambitious Lutie.

THE STREET tells the poignant, often heartbreaking story of Lutie Johnson, a young black woman, and her spirited struggle to raise her son amid the violence, poverty, and racial dissonance of Harlem in the late 1940s. Originally published in 1946 and hailed by critics as a masterwork, The Street was Ann Petry's first novel, a beloved bestseller with more than a million copies in print. Its haunting tale still resonates today.
Comments: (7)
Shak
This book is nothing short of a CLASSIC. This novel is a timeless work that is powerfully and beautifully written. It was one of the first books written by an African-American to sell a million copies. I first read this book as a course requirement in a graduate English class about American novels. I remember feeling furious about the fact that I had not known about the novel before -- and I am a voracious reader. Why hadn't this brilliant novel been assigned at the "mainstream" university I attended as an undergraduate? It appears that, some years back, this groundbreaking novel was “rediscovered;” and, currently, it is being used at the high school, college and graduate school level. Indeed, it is the kind of book that, like Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn, one can plumb more and more from the book as one grows older and and becomes more advanced intellectually. The Street, set in the 1940s, is about a beautiful African American female, separated from her husband, who attempts to advance, as a single parent with a small son, against the forces of racism, discrimination, sexism, poverty and a gritty, crowded, segregated Harlem ghetto environment that is filled with challenges to living a decent quality of life, but is, nevertheless, reassuring, in some aspects, to its African American inhabitants. The 18 chapter book is a tour de force, and easily could have been written today because it brings forth a number of societal issues that are still highly problematic. Those problems include the ways in which Black male/female relationships are impacted by racism and poverty, and the shameful ways in which African American children in urban areas are often negatively, and unjustly, perceived and improperly educated.
Kajikus
Very much in the vein of Richard Wright’s “Native Son”, Petry leads us step by step into the murderous descent of Lutie Johnson.
It is a sad tale, filled with sad characters. However, each one’s own quiet madness is fully developed.
Petry’s personification of the street itself verges on Stephen King-style horror, as does her vivid descriptions of the interior apartments.
But it is the hunger of her characters that strikes the most melancholy chord. They are all people we hope we don’t know, and don’t want to know. They are all lost souls caught up in an un-winnable battle against The Street. And although we know from the first gust of wind blowing through the street that none of them will win - none of them can even HOPE to win - we still pray for their success with each turn of the page, until the soft snow falls at last on The Street - blotting out their mere existence.
Netlandinhabitant
From beginning to end, we follow the life of a Black mother wanting to get her child out of poverty and getting knocked back at every turn. Poverty is prevalent for Black men not being able to find jobs and Black women having to work at menial, low paying service jobs for condescending Whites who treat them as though they were invisible, or worse, make comments very derogatory regarding sex, lack of morals and low intelligence.

Lutie is young, attractive and has an 8 year old son she has dreams for. Instead she is trying desperately to get him out of a three room slum apartment where a super is trying to rape her. She attracts the attention of unsavory men, both Black and get influential White.

When she needs money to save her son, She must decide how far she will go to get money to pay for a lawyer. Her decision presents a huge moral dilemma and what she did absolutely surprised me.

Other characters are presented who also have life changing decisions to make. All of the characters in this book are like layers of an onion - you just keep going layer by layer and get to know more and more about them.

It is also interesting that this story takes place in this 1940s yet could have been written today. It is just as relevant and the issues are the same.

While I thought the book was well written and enjoyed it for that reason, I did not enjoy knowing that the world is still so unfair.
Agarus
I read this on the recommendation of a friend and thoroughly loved the writing. I gave it 5 stars because I can't give it 4.5. My only quibble was the ending of the book. I just don't see the main character doing what she did at the end. That said, any other ending would have been quite complicated and probably added another 100 pages or so.

What I don't understand is why this book has disappeared? If it was such a classic in the 1950's why didn't it carry through like so many other classics?