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eBook Young people in Post-Conflict Northern Ireland: The past cannot be changed, but the future can be developed download

by Dirk Schubotz,Paula Devine

eBook Young people in Post-Conflict Northern Ireland: The past cannot be changed, but the future can be developed download ISBN: 1905541341
Author: Dirk Schubotz,Paula Devine
Publisher: Russell House Publishing (August 31, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 129
ePub: 1859 kb
Fb2: 1717 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: txt rtf azw lit
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Northern Ireland's young people are now coming of age with no memories of the "Troubles. They face all the same issues and opportunities as young people elsewhere.

Northern Ireland's young people are now coming of age with no memories of the "Troubles. This critically important book reflects on a broad-based, holistic, and participative survey of 16-year-olds over the first decade of post-conflict Northern Ireland.

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2007) Young People in Post-Conflict Northern Ireland: The Past Cannot be Changed, but the Future can be. .

2007) Young People in Post-Conflict Northern Ireland: The Past Cannot be Changed, but the Future can be Developed, London: Russell House. Stout, B. (2007) 'Should Northern Irish probation learn from NOMS?', Irish Probation Journal, 4, 25–31. Supervising Offenders in the Community: A History of Probation Practice, Aldershot: Ashgate.

Finding out what young people think about the changes But how do young people perceive the changes over the .

Finding out what young people think about the changes But how do young people perceive the changes over the past 15 years? Whilst growing up in a society coming out of conict sets adolescents from Northern Ireland apart from their counterparts in other parts of the UK, a 16 year old in Belfast deals with the same issues, relating to adolescence, and the developments and decisions young people face en route to adulthood as do their counterparts in London, Edinburgh or Cardiff. This present publication follows on from Young people in post-conict Northern Ireland (Schubotz and Devine, 2008) which focussed on the ndings of the rst ve years of the YLT attitude surveys.

Dirk Schubotz and Paula Devine (Ed. (2014). Young people in post-conflict Northern Ireland

Dirk Schubotz and Paula Devine (Ed. Teenage attitudes across a decade of change in Northern Ireland. Dirk Schubotz and Paula Devine (Ed. (2008). Young people in post-conflict Northern Ireland. The past cannot be changed, but the future can be developed.

Topics addressed include perceptions of sectarianism, poverty, mental health and the structure of schooling, but the two standout chapters for me were on bullying, by Ruth Sinclair of the National Children's Bureau, and sex education, by Simon Blake of the Brook Advisory Clinic.

Most widely held works by Dirk Schubotz. Young people in post-conflict Northern Ireland : the past cannot be changed, but the future can be developed.

s and Kids' Life & Times surveys.

Northern Ireland’s economy is closely connected with Great Britain. Unemployment is higher than in other areas of Britain. But the Protestants who lived in the northern part of the island wanted to stay with Great Britain. in 1922 the island was divided. In former times the production of linen and shipbuilding were the two traditional industries. In the past decades manufacturing has decreased mostly because companies feel they are not safe on the island. Farming still plays a major role in Northern Ireland. Pigs and chicken are raised for meat and eggs. Six, mostly protestant, counties in the north stayed a part of the UK.

Northern Ireland's young people are now coming of age with no memories of the "Troubles." They face all the same issues and opportunities as young people elsewhere. This critically important book reflects on a broad-based, holistic, and participative survey of 16-year-olds over the first decade of post-conflict Northern Ireland. The book contains messages that readers can draw out when considering other post-conflict, segregated, or troubled societies. It highlights young people's frustration toward those who seek to make a difference in society, yet who often approach the issue while holding stereotypical assumptions. It is also a reminder that making a difference in young people's lives requires a need to work across all parts of their lives, not just on the issues that most powerfully present themselves. Young People in Post-Conflict Northern Ireland examines issues such as violence, sectarianism, faith-segregated schools, cross-community contact, politics, the peace process, inward migration, mental health, suicide, bullying, pupil participation, sexual health, poverty, and class. It directs the reader toward these issues in a robust way and suggests the involvement of young people in shaping the process. Also included is the prize-winning essay by 16-year old Shaun Mulvenna titled Is Anybody Listening?