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eBook Joe Cinque's Consolation: A True Story of Death, Grief and the Law download

by Helen Garner

eBook Joe Cinque's Consolation: A True Story of Death, Grief and the Law download ISBN: 0330421786
Author: Helen Garner
Publisher: Pan Macmillan Australia; 1st edition (2006)
Language: English
ePub: 1278 kb
Fb2: 1979 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: azw rtf doc mbr
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Compassionate but unflinching, this is a book about how and why Joe Cinque died.

Compassionate but unflinching, this is a book about how and why Joe Cinque died. It probes the gap between ethics and the law; examines the helplessness of the courts in the face of what we think of as "evil"; and explores conscience, culpability, and the battered ideal of duty of care. It is a masterwork from one of Australia's greatest writers.

Joe Cinque’s Consolation: A True Story of Death, Grief and the Law is a non-fiction book written by Australian author Helen Garner, and published in 2004. The book was adapted into a 2016 film of the same name.

A true story of death, grief and the law. First published 2004 in Picador by Pan Macmillan Australia Pty Limited. 1 Market Street, Sydney.

NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTUREA true story of death, grief and the . Compassionate but unflinching, this is a book about how and why Joe Cinque died

NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTUREA true story of death, grief and the law from the 2019 winner of the Australia Council Award for Lifetime Achievement in Literature. In October 1997 a clever young law student at ANU made a bizarre plan to murder her devoted boyfriend after a dinner party at their house. Compassionate but unflinching, this is a book about how and why Joe Cinque died. It probes the gap between ethics and the law; examines the helplessness of the courts in the face of what we think of as 'evil'; and explores conscience, culpability, and the battered ideal of duty of care.

Focussing on how and why Joe Cinque died, this book probes the gap between ethics and law, explores . This book goes some small way to redressing that. Would that every victim of crime had a Helen Garner to be their voice. A thought-provoking read.

Focussing on how and why Joe Cinque died, this book probes the gap between ethics and law, explores conscience, culpability and more.

No-one can make sense of the death of Joe Cinque. Helen Garner's book explores a bizarre true case of a young Australian woman killing her boyfriend and the ensuing court case.

book by Helen Garner. No-one can make sense of the death of Joe Cinque. It is now almost ten years since he was killed.

Helen Garner does much scouring of her soul throughout Joe Cinque's Consolation.

It flashes out silent signals. Without knowing what she is doing, the writer receives the message, drops everything, and turns to follow. Helen Garner does much scouring of her soul throughout Joe Cinque's Consolation. As she begins to follow the story of the young engineer, Joe Cinque, and his lover, ANU law student Anu Singh, who killed him in October 1997, her own state of mind is stark

Helen Garner, Joe Cinque’s Consolation, A True Story of Death, Grief and the Law (2004).

Helen Garner, Joe Cinque’s Consolation, A True Story of Death, Grief and the Law (2004). Pan Macmillan Australia. And the death is a traumatic event, not only for those involved at its centre and margins but culturally, bringing culpability for killing and mental illness and its legal definitions together in a perfect storm. Traumatic events, by definition do not make sense and often come back in flashback form, looking for a framework or context that enables biography, story and history to form. On a cultural level, Dounoukos’s latest iteration cannot be the last word.

She becomes interested and begins attending hearings in Canberra. It was praised for its writing and its positioning as Joe Cinque's story

Joe Cinque’s Consolation: A True Story of Death, Grief and the Law" is a non-fiction book written by Australian author Helen Garner, and published in 2004.

Joe Cinque’s Consolation: A True Story of Death, Grief and the Law" is a non-fiction book written by Australian author Helen Garner, and published in 2004. Main article: Anu Singh". Anu Singh killed Joe Cinque on October 26 1997 with a lethal dose of heroin

In October 1997 a clever young law student at ANU made a bizarre plan to murder her devoted boyfriend after a dinner party at their house. Some of the dinner guests-most of them university students-had heard rumours of the plan. Nobody warned Joe Cinque. He died one Sunday, in his own bed, of a massive dose of rohypnol and heroin. His girlfriend and her best friend were charged with murder. Helen Garner followed the trials in the ACT Supreme Court. Compassionate but unflinching, this is a book about how and why Joe Cinque died. It probes the gap between ethics and the law; examines the helplessness of the courts in the face of what we think of as 'evil'; and explores conscience, culpability, and the battered ideal of duty of care. It is a masterwork from one of Australia's greatest writers. Winner of New Kelly Award for Best True Crime 2005 Winner of ABA Book of the Year 2004
Comments: (7)
Anayalore
I first heard about this case on Deadly Women "In Cold Blood", and I’ve never forgotten it. The murder of Joe Cinque at the hands of girlfriend, Anu Singh, is one of Australia’s most bizarre murders. What makes the murder of Joe Cinque so tragic is that many people knew it was going to happen, and did nothing to stop it. Prior to the murder, Anu told numerous people that she was planning to kill Joe. But none of those people bothered to warn Joe.

Anu Singh was, and still is, a very manipulative person. And to this day, she doesn't really feel remorse for what she did to Joe or his family. I saw an interview that she did recently. She said she was sorry for what she did, and wished she could "turn back the clock"; but she soon began to talk about how she was suffering mentally at the time she killed Joe. It's all about her, even 20 years later. She only cares about herself and how her life’s been affected. The most shocking thing about the outcome of this case is that she was convicted of manslaughter (a travesty) when it’s so clear that it calculated, premeditated murder. How the judge that presided over the case found her guilty of manslaughter is beyond me. Her defense lawyer presented an argument for “diminished responsibility” brought on by supposed mental illness. Diminished responsibility, my foot. She knew exactly what she was doing. She was manipulating people then, and she's manipulating people now. The worst part is she received a sentence of just 10 years for manslaughter and served only 4 before being released. Anu Singh got away with murder, no doubt about it. And the people who knew of her plan and stood back and let it happen, are guilty right along with her. People say she's crazy. She's crazy like a fox.

Helen Garner gave dignity back to Joe Cinque. A young man who has been largely overlooked and forgotten. Anu Singh has portrayed herself as the victim from day one, but she's no victim. The real victim is Joe Cinque. Joe Cinque was not only a victim of Anu Singh, but also of the Australian justice system.
Kearanny
It is so fortunate that Helen Garner wrote this book. The events are so shocking and unbelievable that the story could easily have been written with the populist in mind and turned into a sordid, little crime novel.

But Garner provides us with so much more. The book is a retelling of the events punctuated with the author’s own reflections as she questions the motives of the main players and struggles with the law’s inherent failures.

She (and we) are incredulous that the law offers no protection and leaves the victim’s family reeling in their grief. To have their son killed by someone with “diminished responsibility” is difficult enough for them to grasp but to know there were so many “spectators” who aided and abetted and did nothing to stop the farcical madness is just too much. The victim’s family listen and endure as Counsel manoeuvre and “normalise” such events; “the spin Mr Lasry [defence Counsel] put on the events of Joe Cinque’s last days was breathtaking in its gall.”

Garner provides us with analysis and questions from all angles: does a judge suffer “from the icy chill, the moral failure of the law”? And what of grief and anguish – where does it go when “formal” retribution fails? And would vengeance and anguish go quietly even if a “just” penalty was imposed? And is it simply a person’s right to choose suicide unquestioned? Her style is thought provoking and has us constantly searching our own beliefs and values.

However the narration does seem to lack a little sequence and coherence - Garner admits she struggled to make sense of it all particularly when reading the joint trial court documents.

It is also grating that Garner would foist herself into the story, wanting to be judged like Singh. Admittedly she wrote the book when she was at a low point and suffering herself but it does seem to seriously clang with the gravity of Joe’s death.

Overall a thought provoking and often disturbing read.
Clodebd
courtroom drama...fierce defense of victims...a woman's subjectivity captivates the narrative.
Мох
The portraits Helen Gatrner drew of the mother, Maria Cinque particularly, and the father Nino, are very real and honest. The grief they felt was heart wrenching as was the unbelievable tragedy that the justice system inflicted on these two earnest and sincere parents. All superbly expressed as is usually the case with Garner.
Browelali
I found this to be quite a fascinating book that considers the impact on the family when a member is murdered. It looks at our justice system and the difficulties for the family when the perpetrator has a mental illness; and the pain it causes when the sentence given is not considered by the family of the victim to be appropriate for the crime. It also raises the question of the victims family to be able to be heard in court.

This book is an insightful memoir (to me) of Ms Garner's experience of the trial and meeting the families.
Cel
Interesting case of how the justice system works in Australia. One families story, the writers friendship with them. Well told and does justice to the story of the young man murderd Joe Cinques. His family should be proud of the book Helen produced basical for them to get some juctice and resolution. A good quick read.
Jogas
This book is so much more than a "true crime" story. Helen Garner offers an insight into the life of Joe Cinque's family and friends dealing with the aftermath of his tragic and pointless murder. The book details the court proceedings and the impact they have on both Cinque's family, Singh's family, and the author herself. It's an uncomfortable and disturbing read but a fascinating one, and I found myself reading well into the wee hours.
The story of the murder/trial is fantastic. I didn't care for the author talking about herself so much, while there is such a fascinating and complex murder trial going on.

This reads like a persons journal almost