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eBook Morphology of the Folktale download

by V. Propp,Louis A. Wagner,Laurence Scott

eBook Morphology of the Folktale download ISBN: 0292783914
Author: V. Propp,Louis A. Wagner,Laurence Scott
Publisher: University of Texas Press; 2nd edition (January 1, 1968)
Language: English
Pages: 184
ePub: 1428 kb
Fb2: 1377 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf mbr txt lrf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Morphology of the Folktale. This page intentionally left blank. University of Texas Press Austin.

Morphology of the Folktale. International Standard Book Number 978-0-292-78376-8. Twentieth paperback printing, 2009. Requests for permission to reproduce material from this work should be sent to

Morphology of the Folktale by. V. Propp.

Morphology of the Folktale by.

Vladimir Propp's "Morphology of the Folktale" is considered to be the seminal source for any study of folklore .

Vladimir Propp's "Morphology of the Folktale" is considered to be the seminal source for any study of folklore and fairy tales (terms which seem interchangeable in this text). And it is easy to see why his study of the structures of fairy tales has remained relevant for almost one hundred years, for Propp argues for a pattern of structure that all fairy stories seem to follow, regardless of which country they spring from.

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years. This book is the classic work on forms of the European folktale.

Propp V Wagner Louis a and Scott Laurence. Show results for. Product Type.

Morphology of the Folktale (Paperback) Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Morphology of the Folktale (Paperback). V Propp (author), Laurence Scott (translator), Svatava Pirkova-Jakobson (author of introduction). Paperback Published: 12/03/2015. Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. Austin: U of Texas P, 1968. Phoenix Books P 756. Chicago: U Chicago P, 1976. Siegel, Paul N. Willy Loman and King Lear. Redfield, James M. Nature and Culture in the Iliad : The Tragedy of Hector. College English 17, March 1956, 341-5. Reprinted in Twentieth Century Interpretations of Death of a Salesman. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1983. Herbert Spencer's Sociology: A Study in the History of Social Theory. New York: Atherton, 1965. Stanford, W. B. The Ulysses Theme: A Study.

Propp, Laurence Scott, Louis A. Wagner.

Morphology of the folktale Vladimir I︠A︡kovlevich Propp Snippet view - 1968. Vladimir Propp was born in Petersburg, April 29, 1895. Translated by. Laurence Scott. Morphology of the folktale Vladimir I︠A︡kovlevich Propp Snippet view - 1968. View all . Common terms and phrases. In 1932 he was called to a position at the University of Leningrad and went on to make major contributions to Russian folklore studies, comparative mythology, and the classification of folklore genres. His international fame is closely tied to the contributions he made to the structural analysis of folklore in Morphology of the Folktale.

Morphology of the Folktale book. Propp, a Russian Formalist, unpacks the genre of folktale paring them down to their essential elements

Morphology of the Folktale book. Propp's foundational work on the structure of fairy tales is impressive, and it's a wonder that his work didn't find its way into English literary circles sooner than it did (it didn't show up for several decades). Propp, a Russian Formalist, unpacks the genre of folktale paring them down to their essential elements. Aug 18, 2016 Cmoreglass rated it really liked it.

This book is the classic work on forms of the European folktale.

Comments: (7)
Priotian
Modern narratology tends to forget that narrative theory, if not
structuralsim itself, came of age with this book. Why?
Because m.n. likes to cast its net wider that folk-tales,
not just into fiction, but also into the way we tell stories in 'fact' -
in our everyday life (including law). The real attraction of
this book, though, is not just its exegesis of Russian folk art,
but its steely, unsentimental discipline, its awareness of what it
sets aside to reveal deep structures, and its sensitivity to the
crossing of categories. It is concise, easy to read, and the folk-tales
Propp examines are also available in translation in p/back.

Propp is not like Genette: he doesn't need you
to read the whole of Proust first. But he is essential,
not least for those who plunge into the turbulent
waters of comparative literature.
Fenritaur
Vladimir Propp's "Morphology of the Folktale" is considered to be the seminal source for any study of folklore and fairy tales (terms which seem interchangeable in this text). And it is easy to see why his study of the structures of fairy tales has remained relevant for almost one hundred years, for Propp argues for a pattern of structure that all fairy stories seem to follow, regardless of which country they spring from. While certainly not the entirety of his research on this subject, "Morphology of the Folktale" is an interesting and challenging read for any scholar studying this topic.

Propp argues that there are thirty-one "functions" (as he terms them) that all fairy stories follow, beginning with an absentation and interdiction (where a character is told not to do something or something bad will happen - sound familiar?). The story is set in motion by the villain and the hero enters the story to make amends or to return home victorious. Most stories end with the defeat of the villain, the return/transformation of the hero, and oftentimes, a marriage. For anyone who has read (or watched) a fairy tale, they will certainly see most if not all of Propp's functions in these tales. Critics have argued that Propp did not take into account the cultural background of these tales or examine why we can have so many versions of one story the world over. Why does almost every culture have a Cinderella tale? But Propp does address this issue, but emphasizes that it isn't specific characters and their characteristics that drive the story, but the function they play. Therefore, it doesn't matter if stories vary in different times and different places due to cultural differences, because it is still the same story structurally.

First written in the 1920s but not well-known until the 1950s, Propp's work can be a challenging read, especially for modern readers. This is due to the fact that Propp confined his research to Russian fairy tales and mentions them by code numbers. If one is not familiar with these tales, it can cause some pauses while reading. Also, Propp makes his structural list into a sort of algorithm to be followed, which can cause confusion as well for all its letters and symbols and subscripts. Yet the heart of Propp's argument is easy to follow and clearly explains why "Morphology of the Folktale" has stood the test of time as a premier examination of those tales which certainly are not only for children.
Hbr
I like this book for so many reasons. The number one reason why I like it is because it goes so far to explain how we tell stories. It's a great reference for someone who studies the evolution of writing.
Fek
Great book to read if you are taking a course in literature and you want an in-depth analysis of Propp's 100 folktales and children stories. I thought I love my Cliffnotes until I read this little gem! I am pleased to have purchased it as it allows me to understand the analogy and comparison of his beautiful work.
Vonalij
In this book, Propp attempts to map out the plot functions of the characters of Russian Fairy Tales in Alexander Afanasẻv. Propp finds over thirty such functions and assigns them alphabetic letters. There are many variations of each function, and these Propp designates by adding a number to the letter as a superscript. He also makes use of a few symbols to represent some important functions: (↑), (↓), (-), (+), (<), (§), and (⋮). Additionally, he uses lower-case letters of the Greek alphabet for introductory functions. He not only uses these symbols to define and represent plot functions, he devises a specific ordering scheme for these symbols and identifies four different possible (fairy) tale types based on this order. Propp's work proves that these Russian (fairy) Tales are all specifically structured. Though he was a Russian Formalist, this work is an important contribution to structural critical theory.

The flaws of this book are as follows:

1) Propp cites most of Afanasẻv's tales by their number, and this numbering system has changed a number of times since he wrote Morphology. The book does have a section that presents the numbering system Propp used and the new numbers of the newer editions of the same 100 tales whose structure Propp studied. But the problem is that these are all Russian editions. The only compilation of Afanasẻv's Russian Fairy Tales in English is the Pantheon edition, which reorganizes the tales and does not number them. Since Propp rarely refers to the titles of these tales, and rarely describes the contents of any tale, it is not possible to verify his conclusions if one does not speak Russian and does not have access to one of the Russian versions of Afanasẻv's collection. A new critical edition of this work is needed that identifies the title of the tale nos. he cites, or the significance of this book will continue to be overlooked, though it deserves much more consideration by literary scholars of any genre. I have obtained the contents pages of the Russian 3-volume version and will soon have it translated in order to be able to use Propp's study more capably. But this is the most significant problem of the book, and it does not begin or end with any problem of the Author's.

2) The functions Propp proposes are incomplete. They apply to the 100 Russian tales he studied. In a preparatory paper for my own Master's Thesis on folk and fairy tale literature, I applied his method to twelve Grimm's tales and found so many possible functions that were undesignated by Propp, that if they were added to Propp's functions, would make his system too unwieldly to use. The varieties of plot functions possible could be infinite, but if not, would make Propp's system too complicated for most researchers to remember.

3) Propp's functions are imprecise and assume too much of a modern viewpoint when the makers of the tales held a pre-modern world-view and were expressing ideas based on that. For an example of Propp's imprecision, his Donor (D) functions are probably meant to refer to magical or supernatural entities encountered in the tales, but they can be applied equally to kings or other powerful natural beings the main character comes into contact with and by whom he/she must obtain some beneficence (magical, as in a magic item; material, as in a monetary reward or food or lodging; or relational, as when a king gives his daughter in marriage to the main character). Propp makes no distinction between natural and supernatural donors. Also, the forms of the magical effect (F--for fantastic elements? But this is an English term and Propp wrote in Russian) do not represent all the kinds of magical possibilities. These elements could be objects, or they could be magical people: if the latter, they could be individuals on their own account or else only exist in our world when called upon by the character, as part of the power of a magic item--Propp lumps them all together in this category, but is that prudent?

4) Propp's functions do not work in the order he prescribes in the Grimm's Tales I studied. For example, the plot functions involving reconnaissance by the villain of the hero, by the hero of the villain, or by other people (of anyone?) Propp organizes as only part of the introductory material and designates them with lower case Greek ε. But I discovered, in the German tales of the Brothers Grimm, that these functions often happened later in the tale, and nothing could prevent these functions from being part of the ending section of the tale. It seems that Propp ignored the creative variety and placement of plot functions in general.

5) Propp is a modern evolutionist, convinced of the claims of empiricism. If one simply posits his designated functions in the right order, one will have a certifiably proper fairy tale. Compound or complex tales could be had by simply adding tales to tales. However my own study revealed that the Grimm's tales, though they often seemed to be constructed of two tales, in reality the second part was really only another representation or furtherance of the tale's main theme. Propp derives themes from the proper elements arranged in the proper way--the result has an evolved "thematic" meaning. But the tales of the Grimm's seem to be the reverse of this: they can be seen, using Propp's own methods, to be built around a main theme--the plot functions seem to be selected æsthetically to support the idea or ideas of the main theme of the tale, and also the arrangement or structure of the tale is also so arranged to support the main theme. This makes Propp's view too partitive to be of definitive use. However, as part of a larger, more inclusive world-view of æsthetic possibilities, his analytical methods can still be very useful--just not in his own terms.

6) The physical form of the paperback book has cut signatures. One will want to use this book over and over again if one studies the structure of literature. The pages easily fall out, necessitating, for me, the purchase of the Kindle version of the book. I have not seen the hardcover version, but if it also has cut signatures, the same problem will occur. The problem with the Kindle version is that it does not mark the page number divisions, which make the Kindle version useless for study, except for its facility of easier searches and the copy and paste abilities making it easier to quote the text and one's own notes added to the text, as is often needed when writing a research paper in a word-processor.

So is the book worth buying--if you are a literary scholar or a lover or writer of fairy tales who is interested in their structure, or interested in how to make fairy tales by using a predefined structural model, then this book is definitely worth buying. It is readable, but is written for professional adults, and requires some thoughtful effort on the part of the reader. Overall, it is an excellent study as a place to begin a structural investigation of stories in general. I have only docked it one star because of its flaws listed above--its value and readability earn it the other four I gave it.
happy light
Thank You!
Flamehammer
This book is key to understanding the form and function of fairy tales. I use it in many of my classes.