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eBook Working Like a Homosexual: Camp, Capital, Cinema download

by Matthew Tinkcom

eBook Working Like a Homosexual: Camp, Capital, Cinema download ISBN: 0822328895
Author: Matthew Tinkcom
Publisher: Duke University Press Books; First Edition edition (March 18, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1339 kb
Fb2: 1904 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: rtf lrf txt lit
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Anyone working on camp will hereafter have to reckon with this book. Steven Cohan, author of Masked Men: Masculinity and the Movies in the Fifties

Anyone working on camp will hereafter have to reckon with this book. Steven Cohan, author of Masked Men: Masculinity and the Movies in the Fifties. A brilliant, innovative study of camp that exceeds the terms in which this topic traditionally has been conceived. Tinkcom's text is hard to digest at times, especially the lengthy introduction that exposes the manuscript's origin as a dissertation. Work through the intro pays off for tenacious readers, as the book is an insightful inquiry into camp using Marxist theory and a menagerie of examples drawn from both "high" and "low" forms of filmic art.

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Tinkcom's text is hard to digest at times, especially the lengthy introduction that exposes the manuscript's origin as a dissertation.

Why is cinema central to camp? With chapters on the films of Vincente Minnelli, Andy Warhol, Kenneth Anger, and John Waters, Working Like a Homosexual responds to these questions by arguing that post–World War II gay male subcultures have fostered their own ways not only o. .

Why is cinema central to camp? With chapters on the films of Vincente Minnelli, Andy Warhol, Kenneth Anger, and John Waters, Working Like a Homosexual responds to these questions by arguing that post–World War II gay male subcultures have fostered their own ways not only of consuming mass culture but of producing it as well.

Working Like a Homosexual book.

This is probably a function of his historical moment, and camp thinkers have been at work on those moments beyond what appears in Marx as the terminus of the commodity-cycle beyond production

In his introduction Tinkcom deftly underscores and examines modernist culture debates around camp, bad taste, kitsch, and fine art.

In his introduction Tinkcom deftly underscores and examines modernist culture debates around camp, bad taste, kitsch, and fine art.

The book also claimed that Lupe Vélez was found drowned in her own vomit with her head in a toilet after she . Tinkcom, Matthew (2002). Duke University Press. p. 211. ISBN 978-0-8223-2889-6.

The book also claimed that Lupe Vélez was found drowned in her own vomit with her head in a toilet after she committed suicide by swallowing more than 500 sleeping tablets  .

Duke University Press.

The projector lamp fits following Epson projectors

The projector lamp fits following Epson projectors

What does camp have to do with capitalism? How have queer men created a philosophy of commodity culture? Why is cinema central to camp? With chapters on the films of Vincente Minnelli, Andy Warhol, Kenneth Anger, and John Waters, Working Like a Homosexual responds to these questions by arguing that post–World War II gay male subcultures have fostered their own ways not only of consuming mass culture but of producing it as well.With a special emphasis on the tensions between high and low forms of culture and between good and bad taste, Matthew Tinkcom offers a new vision of queer politics and aesthetics that is critically engaged with Marxist theories of capitalist production. He argues that camp—while embracing the cheap, the scorned, the gaudy, the tasteless, and what Warhol called “the leftovers” of artistic production—is a mode of intellectual production and a critical philosophy of modernity as much as it is an expression of a dissident sex/gender difference. From Minnelli’s musicals and the “everyday glamour” of Warhol’s films to Anger’s experimental films and Waters’s “trash aesthetic,” Tinkcom demonstrates how camp allowed these gay men to design their own relationship to labor and to history in a way that protected them from censure even as they struggled to forge a role for themselves within a system of “value” that failed to recognize them.