carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » The Transforming Image: Painted Arts of Northwest Coast First Nations (Ubc Museum of Anthropology Research Publication)

eBook The Transforming Image: Painted Arts of Northwest Coast First Nations (Ubc Museum of Anthropology Research Publication) download

by Karen Duffek,Bill McLennan

eBook The Transforming Image: Painted Arts of Northwest Coast First Nations (Ubc Museum of Anthropology Research Publication) download ISBN: 0295980249
Author: Karen Duffek,Bill McLennan
Publisher: Univ of British Columbia Pr (November 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 291
ePub: 1243 kb
Fb2: 1121 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: doc lrf lit azw
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Bill McLennan is project manager for the UBC Museum of Anthropology.

by. Bill McLennan (Author). Bill McLennan is project manager for the UBC Museum of Anthropology. Karen Duffek is the author of Bill Reid: Beyond the Essential Form. This book is a catalog of sorts of a whole collection of very old painted images which were miraculously recovered via infrared photography, then skillfully rendered into reproductions on paper by an extremely skilled artist.

Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia

Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. We are proud to announce that the book The Transforming Image by MOA curators Bill McLennan and Karen Duffek has made the top 25 list of American Indian Art magazine’s most influential books on Native American Art published over the last four decades. Below is the excerpt from the magazine.

Struck by the dynamic character of a 19th-century Northwest Coast painted chest that he had walked past many times at the museum where he worked, Bill McLennan decided to photograph it for closer study. Infrared film produced surprising results. Painted areas that had been obscured with a patina of oils and soot could now be clearly seen, as the complete painting emerged from beneath the weathered surface.

The Transforming Image book. The story of Northwest Coast painting is continuous and unfolding. All who have seen the results so far agree that. It begins with the emergence of the painted line on cedar and skin: the first brushstrokes of an expressive tradition thousands of years in the making. Like the painted images themselves, this story has been shaped by the hands of generations of painters and by the forces of history. Its forms speak of space and balance, of tension and release.

An analytical study of First Nations painted objects from the Northwest Coast showed . First Nations of British Columbia.

An analytical study of First Nations painted objects from the Northwest Coast showed that green earth (celadonite) was used as a green pigment by Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian artists. Green earth appears to have been used less frequently by Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka’wakw artists and was not found on Coast Salish or Nuu-chah-nulth objects. Eight contributors provide essays on Coast Salish art and carving, adding to the author’s portrayal of Joe’s philosophy of art in Salish life, particularly in the context of twentieth century intercultural relations.

by Karen Duffek Exhibition organized by the UBC Museum of Anthropology (MOA) and toured to several venues, including the National Gallery o. .

An essay in the catalogue "Paint: The Painted Work of Lyle Wilson," 2012. Maple Ridge Pitt Meadows Arts Council, ed. Barbara Duncan. Publication accompanying exhibition of same name, UBC Museum of Anthropology, 2011. Museum note no. 40. Includes essay by John O'Brian. Exhibition organized by the UBC Museum of Anthropology (MOA) and toured to several venues, including the National Gallery of Canada (NGC). Published by MOA in association with the NGC. 64 pp.

Bill McLennan is Curator, Pacific Northwest, at the UBC Museum of Anthropology. Robin K. Wright, Bill Holm Center Endowed Professor of Art History, School of Art, Curator of Native American Art and Director of the Bill Holm Center,.

Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1962. McLennan, Bill and Karen Duffek. The Transforming Image: Painted Arts of Northwest Coast First Nations. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2000. Art of the Northwest Coast. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2006. Art of the Northern Tlingit. Cedar: Tree of Life to the Northwest Coast Indians. Douglas & McIntyre, 1984. Sturtevant, William C. Boxes and Bowls: Decorated Containers by Nineteenth-Century Haida, Tlingit, Bella Bella, and Tsimshian Indian Artists.

Coined by Bill Holm in his 1965 book Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form, the "formline is. University of British Columbia.

Coined by Bill Holm in his 1965 book Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form, the "formline is the primary design element on which Northwest Coast art depends, and by the turn of the 20th century, its use spread to the southern regions as well. It is the positive delineating force of the painting, relief and engraving. Formlines are continuous, flowing, curvilinear lines that turn, swell and diminish in a prescribed manner. They are used for figure outlines, internal design elements and in abstract compositions.

The Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia (UBC) campus in Vancouver, British Columbia . Walter and Marianne Koerner's 1975 donation of their extensive collection of Northwest Coast First Nations art to the museum formed a large part of the building's contents.

The Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia (UBC) campus in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada is renowned for its displays of world arts and cultures, in particular works by First Nation band governments of the Pacific Northwest. In 1997, Ruth Phillips became museum director. In 2002, Ames returned as acting director.

Struck by the dynamic character of a 19th-century Northwest Coast painted chest that he had walked past many times at the museum where he worked, Bill McLennan decided to photograph it for closer study. Infrared film produced surprising results. Painted areas that had been obscured with a patina of oils and soot could now be clearly seen, as the complete painting emerged from beneath the weathered surface. With this find, the Image Recovery Project was born, whose object was to produce a database of infrared photographs of historical Northwest Coast paintings. The Transforming Image brings together some of the most intriguing images, many revealed for the first time since the objects were collected at the beginning of the 20th century. The written text by Karen Duffek brings forward new insights derived from the project's detective work, linking painted images to communities, histories, and the hands of individual painters.

The Transforming Image arose from the need of current generations to gain access to the creative achievements of their ancestors and to build on the cultural knowledge that the old paintings could reveal.

Comments: (4)
Dalallador
Utterly incredible! This book is a catalog of sorts of a whole collection of very old painted images which were miraculously recovered via infrared photography, then skillfully rendered into reproductions on paper by an extremely skilled artist. Without the enormous efforts that went into creating this treasure, it is likely that each of the images portrayed would have soon been lost forever- but now they have been safely preserved on paper and in this book for future generations.

If you have any interest whatsoever in Northwest Coast art, this book will fascinate you.
JoJogar
This is a great book.
Gavinranara
Each object of Northwest Coast art can been seen in many different ways: as a work of art, a tool, a commodity, a family treasure, a cultural icon, a religious artifact. A meaning is assigned to each of these viewpoints, and a valuation is attached to each meaning. Deep significance and deeper cultural implications accrue around these objects in multiple layers. This is a complicated aspect of their provenances.

This book cuts through some of these complications--literally and figuratively. While acknowledging that each object has its own inherent values and that these values function on many different levels, the level that is examined here is the most basic one--it is that of the form-line, and the "language" of the designs. The visual alphabet of the paintings is made clear. Though it's a fundamental investigation, in the sense that it doesn't stray very far into the metaphysical realm or the political arena, it's fascinating.

In an attempt to preserve and share this language of the form-line, Bill McLennan, curator of the UBC Museum of Anthropology, photographed many old bentwood boxes, storage chests, boards and screens with infared and high contrast film. This revealed new intricacies of design, style and coloration that were otherwise invisible under layers of oil and soot or that were faded from exposure.

Compositional skills and variations, slight asymmetries of forms, and even nuances of brushstrokes suddenly emerged--and with these came a deeper awareness of, and appreciation for, individual artists.

Lyle Wilson, a contemporary Haisla artist, has carefully drawn and painted numerous "reconstructions" of the designs. His contributions, set next to the originals, are remarkable in their clarity and precision.

Karen Duffek has written a knowledgeable text to accompany the comprehensive imagery. There are numerous color photographs of the various objects; page after page of infared photographs of the bentwood boxes next to reconstructed drawings of their designs; many great black-and-white archival photographs; a wonderful chapter on pigments; information on compositional styles and schools; and the work of some contemporary artists. It's a good resource book for anyone who has a dedicated interest in Northwest Coast art. It would be of particular interest for artists, who will find the clarity of the lines to be helpful and the great diversity of the designs to be illuminating.
Danrad
A lot of great research has gone into this book. They have some incredibly wonderful examples in clear understandable photographs, including marvelously, the box Bill Reid was buried in, by the master of the Black Form.

If you're interested in Northwest coast graphic art, I think this is on par with Bill Holm's book - it's the best there is.