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by Erica Fischer

eBook Aimee and Jaguar: A Love Story, Berlin 1943 download ISBN: 0060183500
Author: Erica Fischer
Publisher: Harpercollins; 1st edition (October 1, 1995)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1113 kb
Fb2: 1644 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: txt lrf doc azw
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

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Aimée & Jaguar book.

Erica Fischer was born in 1943 in England. Her parents were refugees there and returned to Austria with their two children in 1948. Erica Fischer studied at the Interpreting Institute of the University of Vienna, was a founding member of the second wave women's movement in Vienna, and started working there as a journalist in the mid-1970s. She has been living in Germany since 1988 as a freelance journalist, writer, and translator, residing in Berlin since 1994. Every film critic remarks of Aimee and Jaguar that the story is too strange for fiction: the Nazi housewife in love with the ultra-spunky Jewish lesbian nd resistance fighter.

Aimée (Lilly) and Jaguar (Felice) started forging plans for the future Erica Fischer was born in 1943 in England.

Aimée (Lilly) and Jaguar (Felice) started forging plans for the future. They composed poems and love letters to each other, and wrote their own marriage contract. When Jaguar admitted to her lover that she was Jewish, this dangerous secret drew the two women even closer to each other. But their luck didn't last. Erica Fischer was born in 1943 in England.

Every film critic remarks of Aimee and Jaguar that the story is too strange for fiction: the Nazi housewife in love with the ultra-spunky Jewish lesbian nd resistance fighter.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Erica Fischer (Author). If, like me, you walked away from the film with an uneasy sense that some of the story's more astonishing turns and fantastic characters were merely the products of stellar film-making, this book is for you.

Fischer, Erica, 1943-. Wust, Elisabeth, Schragenheim, Felice, 1922-1944?, Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945). Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on August 15, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Aimee & Jaguar: A Love Story, Berlin 1943. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Fischer, Erica (1995). Aimée & Jaguar: A Love Story, Berlin 1943. Erica Fischer, Das kurze Leben der Jüdin Felice Schragenheim, Deutscher Taschenbuch Verlag, 2002, ISBN 978-3423308618. Los Angeles: Alyson Publications, Inc. ISBN 978-1555834500. "Wust, Elisabeth," in "The Righteous Among the Nations.

A unique and tragic love story between two women, set against the Holocaust and brought to life with letters, diaries .

A unique and tragic love story between two women, set against the Holocaust and brought to life with letters, diaries, documents, and photographs. Aimee was a housewife, mother of four, married to a Nazi officer. Jaguar was a Jewish woman living underground in Berlin during World War II. This is Aimee’s remembrance of their unlikely romance. Discussion Questions.

Aimée & Jaguar: Eine Liebesgeschichte, Berlin 1943" bietet bewegende Einblicke in das Leben zweier . I think Fischer's mistrust and judgment came into her writing and storytelling.

Aimée & Jaguar: Eine Liebesgeschichte, Berlin 1943" bietet bewegende Einblicke in das Leben zweier außergewöhnlicher Frauen und in ein wichtiges Stück deutsche Geschichte. It was love almost at first sight. Aimée (Lilly) and Jaguar (Felice) started forging plans for the future. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Aimee & Jaguar: A Love Story, Berlin 1943 by Erica Fischer (Paperback, 2015). Brand new: lowest price.

Out of the vacuum created by history's scant attention to Nazi persecution of homosexuals comes a unique and maddeningly tragic story of love between two women of startling contrast. Aimee & Jaguar is the first book of its kind: it tells, through Rashomon-like firsthand accounts, of the horrors - and the joysshared by Felice Schragenheim, who did not survive the war, and Elisabeth Wust, who lived to finally tell their story after more than fifty years of silence. Aimee & Jaguar is set against a compelling historical backdrop of increasing pressure placed on Jews, homosexuals, and non-Aryans in Nazi Germany beginning in the early 1930s.
Comments: (7)
Meztisho
Every film critic remarks of Aimee and Jaguar that the story is too strange for fiction: the Nazi housewife in love with the ultra-spunky Jewish lesbian journalist/underground resistance fighter. If, like me, you walked away from the film with an uneasy sense that some of the story's more astonishing turns and fantastic characters were merely the products of stellar film-making, this book is for you. Ms. Fischer treats her text as an honest-to-goodness historian should and provides a wealth of primary source documents -- interviews, letters, post cards, receipts -- to support every anecdote.

It differs in from the film in that it is less a story of dramatic seduction (although that certainly figures in; you could hardly tell the story without it) and more about the larger narrative of how one short life and one long life intersected. The nuts and bolts of Lily's character remain a subject for valid debate, although it is worth noting that Ms. Fischer makes no secret of her intention to portray the troubled woman in a less than flattering light.

Felice Schraggenheim continues to be the real too-colorful-to-be-true scene-stealer, as she was in the film and, apparently, in life. It is neither cinematic genius nor the flair of a novelist that exaggerate her character into something larger than life; primary source documents confirm that this remarkable young woman built that pedestal herself and unabashedly climbed on top of it. Up to the very last, her letters were eloquent, warm, loving, brave, and -- impossibly! -- funny.

Caveat: if you are looking for an unblemished love story, you will have to willfully ignore a lot in order to find it here. Lily and Felice were real people, and they had accrued some serious psychological issues before they met. The film relies on viewers to infer that by 1944, both women -- like most Berliners -- were carrying far too much baggage to be genuinely well-adjusted. Ms. Fischer is more frank about it. For my ten bucks, that makes for a richer and more compelling tale in which two profoundly imperfect people find a dangerous and unsustainable comfort in each other's arms. But if you were looking for a romance so flawless that only the Holocaust could ruin it, best stick to fiction.
Flamehammer
A Holocaust story that will take you into that hideous time in history but will give you hope because there were good Germans who cared. Such a deep, lasting love. Felt so sorry for Lilly, she was so lost without Felice from the time the Nazis taken Felice until Lilly's death decades later. Also showed the devastation that war brings during the fight and when the rebuilding begins.
Burisi
This is such a powerful book. It lays out an incredibly chilling chapter in history in such a plainspoken, personal way. This is a beautiful love story. The two main characters are fascinating and dynamic, so the relationship that unfolds between personal letters and meticulous research has a great chemistry. Maybe because I read it now -- during the first two weeks of the Trump presidency -- I found it gut-wrenching, heartbreaking, and all too real. The march of bureaucracy might be dry if not for the context. Suddenly, reading this book at this moment in America, I can totally see how the good people of Germany were sucked into the quicksand of a fascist regime. Tiny details brought me to tears. Like one of the earliest actions of the Third Reich: removing Jews from the national healthcare system as a first step toward exterminating them. Because I was diagnosed with blood cancer in my early 30s, Obamacare was my only hope for having insurance. It's paperwork to most people, but to those who are affected by that small, cold stroke of the pen -- they feel it like a knife in the back. I really applaud Erica Fischer for the extraordinary job she did on the research and writing of this important book. I found it profoundly moving. Unforgettable. Highly, highly, highly recommending, especially for book clubs, historical fiction readers, and high school libraries.
Landaron
A love story of incredible importance. Love is love is love, and when it is true, it brings with it, incredible acts of courage. This is one of the most original stories that I have read about the Holocaust, that is is also true makes it even more powerful.
Cointrius
This book is the very first book to ever make me cry, and I'm one of those people who've read all types of genres. It was captivating and compelling. Like many, I saw the movie first, but when I saw it was a true story, I simply had to have the book as well. I am glad I did. The book provided the background and meaning that the movie left out. Because of the book, I will probably have to rewatch the movie again.

The courage, bravery, and love shown in this novel is beyond compare. It's a read worth reading slowly.
Shak
Great read. I liked how the author took me into the conflicted complicated emotions of the characters.
Wafi
Although the beginning was a little rough, the overall story is an interesting perspective on life in WWII Germany; especially as portrayed on all sides of the race issue: the victims, the perpetrators, and the non-participants who are forced to particpate. I was not so impressed with the personal correspondence/love letters but I guess in hindsight, they did contribute to the circumstances of the moment. I would recommend this book to persons interested in the study of Nazi Germany.
I bought this after seeing the film. I think the book does fill in a lot of the gaps that the film might leave a subtitle-reader such as myself.
I loved that there are actual photos inside the book. Well researched.
I don't share the shock of some of the previous reviewers about the epilogue written by the author. The author is a German Jew and is upset. Who wouldn't be?