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by Renya K. Ramirez

eBook Native Hubs: Culture, Community, and Belonging in Silicon Valley and Beyond download ISBN: 0822340062
Author: Renya K. Ramirez
Publisher: Duke University Press Books (July 9, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1587 kb
Fb2: 1137 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: rtf doc azw lit
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Renya K. Ramirez makes compelling use of ethnographic interviews to explore broad issues of cultural citizenship and transnational migration.

Renya K. Her analysis of Laverne Roberts's notion of 'hubs' connecting Native people across time and space is a significant contribution to the all too sparse scholarship on urban American Indian communities. -Susan Applegate Krouse, Director of the American Indian Studies Program, Michigan State University.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Native Hubs: Culture, Community, and Belonging in. .Renya K. Ramirez makes compelling use of ethnographic interviews to explore broad issues of cultural citizenship and transnational migration

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Native Hubs: Culture, Community, and Belonging in Silicon Valley and Beyond.

Culture, Community, and Belonging in Silicon Valley and Beyond.

Native Hubs : Culture, Community, and Belonging in Silicon Valley and Beyond. Most Native Americans in the United States live in cities, where many find themselves caught in a bind, neither afforded the full rights granted .

Page 1. native hubs CULTURE, COMMUNITY, AND BELONGING IN SILICON VALLEY AND BEYON D VV RENYA K.Abstract Too often there is the assumption in Native communities that we as indigenous. Publication Date: Jan 1, 2007. RAMIREZ Page 2. Page 3. Native Hubs Page 4. Page 5. Native Hubs Culture, Community, and Belonging i. Julia Sanchez's story: An indigenous woman between nations more. Publication Name: Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism.

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Download PDF book format. Introduction Disciplinary forces and resistance : the Silicon Valley and beyond Gathering together in hubs : claiming home and the sacred in an urban area Roberts's relocation story : through the hub Who are the "real Indians"? : use of hubs by Muwekma Ohlones and relocated Native Americans Empowerment and identity from the hub : indigenous women from Mexico and the United States "Without papers" : a transnational.

Event in Chicago, IL by Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture on Wednesday, February 24 2016. CRES Talks presents "Native Hubs: Culture, Community, and Belonging in Silicon Valley and Beyond". Hosted by Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture.

cle{, title {Native Hubs: Culture, Community and Belonging in Silicon Valley and Beyond}, author {Joely Proudfit}, journal {Western Historical Quarterly}, year {2010}, volume {41}, pages {375-376} }. Joely Proudfit.

Bibliographic Details. Title: Native Hubs: Culture, Community, and. Publisher: Duke University Press Books. Publication Date: 2005. Standard shipping can on occasion take up to 30 days for delivery. List this Seller's Books.

n can be seen in the Yalalteco community in Los Angeles through the perseverance of their cultural . Ramirez, Renya (2007). Native Hubs: Culture, Community, and Belonging in Silicon Valley and Beyond. Duke University Press Books. p. 288. ISBN 0822340305.

n can be seen in the Yalalteco community in Los Angeles through the perseverance of their cultural solidarity from Oaxaca to California, and the maintenance of community ties that traverse national boundaries.

Most Native Americans in the United States live in cities, where many find themselves caught in a bind, neither afforded the full rights granted U.S. citizens nor allowed full access to the tribal programs and resources—particularly health care services—provided to Native Americans living on reservations. A scholar and a member of the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, Renya K. Ramirez investigates how urban Native Americans negotiate what she argues is, in effect, a transnational existence. Through an ethnographic account of the Native American community in California’s Silicon Valley and beyond, Ramirez explores the ways that urban Indians have pressed their tribes, local institutions, and the federal government to expand conventional notions of citizenship.

Ramirez’s ethnography revolves around the Paiute American activist Laverne Roberts’s notion of the “hub,” a space that allows for the creation of a sense of belonging away from a geographic center. Ramirez describes “hub-making” activities in Silicon Valley, including sweat lodge ceremonies, powwows, and American Indian Alliance meetings, gatherings at which urban Indians reinforce bonds of social belonging and forge intertribal alliances. She examines the struggle of the Muwekma Ohlone, a tribe aboriginal to the San Francisco Bay area, to maintain a sense of community without a land base and to be recognized as a tribe by the federal government. She considers the crucial role of Native women within urban indigenous communities; a 2004 meeting in which Native Americans from Mexico and the United States discussed cross-border indigenous rights activism; and the ways that young Native Americans in Silicon Valley experience race and ethnicity, especially in relation to the area’s large Chicano community. A unique and important exploration of diaspora, transnationalism, identity, belonging, and community, Native Hubs is intended for scholars and activists alike.

Comments: (2)
Gavidor
Overall I really liked this book. I would have liked to see more about alternative urban communities because there is a lot left out by just talking about those urban indians who fit into a kind of generic mold of having no other identities that might have conflict around them (not wanting to associate with indian identity, gay, youth, etc.). However, Ramirez does show some of the identity politics of indian communities which is what I really enjoyed reading - having experienced much of this myself it was cool to see a researcher actually tackling it head on and challenging some of these issues.
Iriar
Highly recommended