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eBook Intercultural Dispute Resolution in Aboriginal Contexts download

by Bell

eBook Intercultural Dispute Resolution in Aboriginal Contexts download ISBN: 0774810270
Author: Bell
Publisher: UBC Press (February 1, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 384
ePub: 1881 kb
Fb2: 1894 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: docx txt docx azw
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Start by marking Intercultural Dispute Resolution In Aboriginal Contexts as Want to Read .

Start by marking Intercultural Dispute Resolution In Aboriginal Contexts as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This book will appeal to students and scholars of Aboriginal law and alternative dispute resolution; legal and political theorists; dispute resolution practitioners; and anyone involved in land claims, treaty, and self-government agreements in Canada or abroad.

With contributions from Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal theorists and practitioners, Intercultural Dispute Resolution in Aboriginal Contexts presents an array of insightful perspectives. This book will appeal to students and scholars of Aboriginal law and alternative dispute resolution; legal and political theorists; dispute resolution practitioners; and anyone involved in struggles around land claims, treaty, and self-government agreements in Canada or abroad.

Intercultural Dispute Resolution in Aboriginal Contexts.

Intercultural dispute resolution in aboriginal contexts Princeton: Princeton University Press. New York: Basic Books. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Oman, N. Forthcoming. Omi, M. and H. Winant.

Book Notes: Laws Quandary, by Steven D. Smith Book Notes: Laws . Productive Confusion: Advancing Intercultural Perspectives. Smith Book Notes: Laws Quandary, by Steven D. Smith. Working at the interface in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health: focussing on the individual health professional and their organisation as a means to address health equity Productive Confusion: Advancing Intercultural Perspectives Through A Multicultural Professional Development Program For Educational Leaders. Catherine Bell, David Kahane (You?) 2005. 9. Taking a cross-disciplinary approach, it explains the cognitive, social, organizational and developmental psychology theories that influence ADR and its approaches. From mediation to arbitration to hybrid processes, it helps students understand the strengths and weaknesses of the many varieties of ADR, and why various approaches succeed or fail.

Intercultural Dispute Resolution in Aboriginal Contexts, 2004

Intercultural Dispute Resolution in Aboriginal Contexts, 2004. Osi, Carlo, ‘Understanding Indigenous Dispute Resolution Processes and Western Alternative Dispute Resolution: Cultivating Appropriate Methods in Lieu of Litigation’ Cardozo Journal of Conflict Resolution 10: 163, 2008. Sarfaty, Galit, ‘International Norm Diffusion in the Pimicikamak Cree Nation: A Model of Legal Mediation’ Harvard International Law Journal 48, 2007.

Generalizing about Aboriginal and Newcomer Perspectives in Bell, Catherine & Kahane, David, eds, Intercultural Dispute Resolution in Aboriginal Contexts (Vancouver: UBC Press, 2004) at 33-42 [Kahane.

In the last twenty years, there has been a growing interest in alternative dispute resolution (ADR), as scholars and practitioners seek more effective, context-sensitive approaches to conflict. Where formerly conflict was tackled and "resolved" in formal legal settings and with an adversarial spirit, more conciliatory approaches - negotiation, mediation, problem-solving, and arbitration - are now gaining favour. These new methods are proving especially appropriate in intercultural contexts, particularly for Aboriginal land claims, self-government, and community-based disputes.The essays collected here by Catherine Bell and David Kahane provide a balanced view of ADR, exploring its opportunities and effectiveness alongside its challenges and limits. They are international in scope, with examples of efforts (some successful, some not) at dispute resolution involving Inuit and Arctic peoples, Dene, Gitxsan and Wet'suwet'en, Tsuu T'ina, Cree, Metis, Navajo, Maori, Aboriginal Australians, and Torres Strait Islanders. They have been written by theorists and practitioners, and by Aboriginals as well as non-Aboriginals. The book is divided into four sections: theoretical perspectives, international contexts, Canadian contexts, and issues of design and implementation. Each offers a focused examination from several different viewpoints.This book will appeal to students and scholars of Aboriginal law and alternative dispute resolution; legal and political theorists; dispute resolution practitioners; and anyone involved in land claims, treaty, and self-government agreements in Canada or abroad.