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eBook Race, Class, And Gender In The United States: An Integrated Study download

by Paula S. Rothenberg

eBook Race, Class, And Gender In The United States: An Integrated Study download ISBN: 0312153511
Author: Paula S. Rothenberg
Publisher: Worth Pub; 4th edition (April 7, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 604
ePub: 1951 kb
Fb2: 1552 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf lit rtf lrf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

If a book holds info about race, class, gender. This is a great book for people who are uneducated in the inequalities that exist in America. This book was a requirement for my first class discussing issues such as these.

If a book holds info about race, class, gender. expect sectionality/and your stuff to flip. I was very fond of this book. I took this class with no history of discussions with issues that this book discusses.

Rothenberg offers students 126 readings, each providing different perspectives and examining the ways in which race, gender, class, and sexuality are socially constructed. Rothenberg deftly and consistently helps students analyze each phenomena, as well as the relationships among them, thereby deepening their understanding of each issue surrounding race and ethnicity. Race, Class, and Gender in the United States: An Integrated Study.

Race, Class, and Gender in the United States: An Integrated Study. Скачать (pdf, 1. 7 Mb) Читать.

Paula . othenberg is a Senior Fellow at The Murphy Institute, City University of New York and Professor Emerita at. .I used this book for an introductory class to Race, Class and Gender at my university. othenberg is a Senior Fellow at The Murphy Institute, City University of New York and Professor Emerita at William Patterson University of New Jersey. From 1989 to 2006 she served as Director of The New Jersey Project on Inclusive Scholarship, Curriculum, and Teaching. I have taken a few classes that have discussed these topics in the past, but not to the extent that we covered.

Race, Class, and Gender in the United S. Online Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound. Paperback, 674 pages.

Paula S. Rothenberg is a Senior Fellow at The Murphy Institute, City University of New York and Professor Emerita at William . 1. Immigration in the United States: New Economic, Social, Political Landscapes with Legislative Reform on the Horizon Faye Hipsman and Doris Meissner. Rothenberg is a Senior Fellow at The Murphy Institute, City University of New York and Professor Emerita at William Patterson University of New Jersey. She is the author of several books including the autobiographical Invisible Privilege: A Memoir about Race, Class, and Gender. 2. Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of America Mae Ngai.

Paula Rothenberg; Christina Hsu Accomando. Part I, The Social Construction of Difference: Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality.

They also get to hear about actual activism and social change efforts historically and in the present. Paula Rothenberg; Christina Hsu Accomando. 1 What Race Isn’t: Teaching about Racism-Aurora Levins Morales. 2 Racial Formation-Michael Omi and Howard Winant. 3 Derailing Rebellion: Inventing White Privilege-Pem Davidson Buck. Race, Class, and Gender in the United States: An Integrated Study presents students with a compelling, clear study of issues of race, gender, and sexuality within the context of class

by. Rothenberg, Paula . 1943-.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. by.

Like no other text, this best-selling anthology effectively introduces students to the complexity of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States and illustrates how these categorie. com/?book 1464178666.

Race, Class, And Gender In The United States: An Integrated Study [paperback] Paula S. Rothenberg [Apr 07, 1998]
Comments: (7)
fire dancer
I used this book for an introductory class to Race, Class and Gender at my university. I have read more than 60% of the book and almost all of the articles were enjoyable, especially those in section 6, which cover several author's personal experiences with racism. I have taken a few classes that have discussed these topics in the past, but not to the extent that we covered. This book is highly valuable to those interested in learning about race, class, and gender in America. Some of the articles I had read before, but the fact they were included in the text only highlights their validity. It has also been helpful in my daily conversations with people, and I tend to reference information from it. If it weren't so expensive, I would purchase my rental for future reference.
Xal
The textbook came in good condition, practically brand new. Content-wise, the book is set up in a simple way that is easy to understand, go through, and have plenty of resources.
However,I am giving 2 stars because the book is misprinted; there are 40 pages missing and another 30 pages are printed twice. So, it does get in the way of reading for classes and studying for tests.
Roram
Systemic racism and how its rooted into many institutions. Most of the chapters are all short 1-3 or 5 page stories that do hit "Race, Class, Gender, and Some." Some "chapters" were extremely liberal...but that was due mainly to the author for those stories. So think of it overall as a collection of stories. If you're looking for voices from narratives you normally don't see at the front of Barnes & Nobles (i.e., young girl's version of life in WWII Japanese internment camps), then this would be a good start.

Some of my classmates were angry and uncomfortable. Great! That meant the reading wouldn't be too boring. Made me uncomfortable as well reading stuff that many choose to ignore/or refuge in it being in the past. Others started to use the usual political rhetoric/charges to defend either why the book wasn't great to them, to what they "really" needed to learn, etc. If a book holds info about race, class, gender....in the United States...expect multi-cultural/intersectionality/and your stuff to flip.

This ain't some textbook mentioning a few things, some dates, and where we are now for $30.

Unfortunately, you're probably going to learn a few things.
Miromice
This is a great book for people who are uneducated in the inequalities that exist in America. This book was a requirement for my first class discussing issues such as these. I was very fond of this book. I took this class with no history of discussions with issues that this book discusses. I feel the book presents writings that are really easy to understand, even for people who don't have prior knowledge on these issues. If you want to learn about issues on disparities in America, this is a great book to start. It isn't intimidating in anyway.
August
Great
Gann
On the surface, this text is fairly devoted to discussing issues of diversity and discrimination within the groups noted on the cover. However, even in this most recent version, there are glaring omissions and badly chosen inclusions which frankly perpetuate the problem this collection is attempting to help resolve. On matters of race and class, it does a fairly solid job from where I sit. I'm finding its handling of gender and sexuality to be rather short-sighted and sometimes downright erasing. For what it includes, I'd fault it for choosing the Lorber essay for its over-reliance on the claim that "doing gender" is gender identity. That approach contributes heavily to the philosophy of anti-trans radical feminists who claim trans women are faking it to gain access to women's spaces. It also directly contradicts the lived experiences of trans people, who perform gender in a myriad of ways but first and foremost know our gender from within as a core state of being.

That last sentence includes people whose gender identity is fluid or otherwise outside the binary, which brings me to my second problem. Every last essay on gender spoke only of the binary genders. In a 2017 edition, that is a gross omission. When even Bill Nye or Adam Savage can look at the research and see the diversity within human biology and psychology, this text's failure to do so is almost mind-boggling. It also entirely omits trans men from the discussion, and there are writers from that group with piercing analyses of both feminine and masculine gender roles who could be heard from. The least they could've done is check in with Chaz Bono.

As for its approach to discussing sexual orientation, it again commits the error of only discussing the assumed binary of heterosexual vs homosexual. Worse, it does so by relying on discussing gay identities only. It has no essays from lesbians discussing themselves. It also completely fails to account for bisexuality (by which I mean the umbrella term for non-monosexual identities) or asexuality. Some of the essays even erase bisexuals from existence entirely until they use the acronym LGBT as a short form for "gays, lesbians, and drag queens" or swaps in transgender women for the third group (see "The Ghosts of Stonewall" for one example).

I shouldn't have felt erased by a text that wants to reduce discrimination and increase understanding. And yet, there I was, absent from the conversation because Rothenberg couldn't be bothered to realize more exists beyond the binaries she's comfortable with maintaining. She also committed a faux pas against the trans women she included by letting in someone who claimed all gender is constructed and performed. Some might argue this is an introductory text and should be forgiven. But when a social introduction tells you about most of the faces in the room and ignores the rest, the ones who are passed over are right to see that as rude. We who were ignored by Rothenberg's choices are just as present as the snubbed people at the hypothetical gathering. I hope she improves her approach for the next edition so future readers receive a better introduction, not a curated one that rejects valid voices in the name of whatever ideal she thought she was serving.
Whitescar
This book was required for a class. I liked it so much I will keep it
This textbook is really written as an anthology of pertinent articles related to the topic. It is a very easy read in terms of textbooks, as the individual articles are well-written and are short enough to get through and take a breath before diving into the next.