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by Frederick Douglass

eBook The Heroic Slave (Dodo Press) download ISBN: 1409949877
Author: Frederick Douglass
Publisher: Dodo Press (January 29, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 48
ePub: 1339 kb
Fb2: 1877 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mbr docx lrf docx
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Frederick Douglass, The Heroic Slave.

Frederick Douglass, The Heroic Slave. Part 2: contemporary responses to the creole rebellion, 1841–1843. 2 Douglass then serialized the novella in March 1853 in his newspaper, Frederick Douglass’ Paper.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is an 1845 memoir and treatise on abolition written by famous orator and former slave Frederick Douglass during his time in Lynn, Massachusetts

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is an 1845 memoir and treatise on abolition written by famous orator and former slave Frederick Douglass during his time in Lynn, Massachusetts. It is generally held to be the most famous of a number of narratives written by former slaves during the same period

1818 In February Frederick Douglass is born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey in Tuckahoe, Maryland. However, its publication exposes his identity, and fearing capture as a fugitive slave, he leaves the country.

1818 In February Frederick Douglass is born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey in Tuckahoe, Maryland. His mother, Harriet Bailey, is a slave; his father’s identity is unknown, though many believe he was Douglass’s white master, Aaron Anthony. He begins traveling through England and Ireland, speaking against slavery.

Famed abolitionist Frederick Douglass based his only fictional work on the .

Famed abolitionist Frederick Douglass based his only fictional work on the gripping true story of the biggest slave rebellion in . The Heroic Slave was inspired by a courageous uprising led by Madison Washington in 1841. Washington rallied 18 of the 135 slaves aboard a ship bound for New Orleans, the country's primary slave-trading market. Douglass presents Madison Washington's heroism less as a matter of violent escape and more as a voluntary act of claiming self-ownership. Douglass's retelling encouraged readers to engage in the abolitionist cause.

The Heroic Slave was Frederick Douglass' only piece of fiction. He wrote it in response to the Rochester Ladies' Anti-Slavery Society's request for a submission to be included in their anthology Autographs for Freedom

The Heroic Slave was Frederick Douglass' only piece of fiction. He wrote it in response to the Rochester Ladies' Anti-Slavery Society's request for a submission to be included in their anthology Autographs for Freedom. The Heroic Slave is a retelling of an actual rebellion led by Madison Washington on the slave ship Creole. Douglass shows how the rebellion is part of a revolution and therefore fundamentally American. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Douglass shows how the rebellion is part of a The Heroic Slave was Frederick Douglass' only piece of fiction

Похожие книги: CliffsNotesTM on Douglass? Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Clotelle; Or, the Colored Heroine (Dodo Press).

Похожие книги: CliffsNotesTM on Douglass? Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Cliffs Test Preparation Guides help students prepare f. т 619. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. The powerful story of slavery that has become a classi. т 972. eloquence gives a clear indication of the powerful prin от 1853. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass – An American Slave, Written by Himself. The Heroic Slave, a Thrilling Narrative of the Advent. т 563.

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Ex-slave Frederick Douglass's second n after ten years of reflection following his legal .

Ex-slave Frederick Douglass's second n after ten years of reflection following his legal emancipation in 1846 and his break with his mentor William Lloyd Garrison-catapulted Douglass into the international spotlight as the foremost spokesman for American blacks, both freed and slave. First published nearly a decade prior to the Civil War, The Heroic Slave is the only fictional work by abolitionist, orator, author, and social reformer Frederick Douglass, himself a former slave.

Frederick Douglass circa 1874

Frederick Douglass circa 1874. In September 1862, Abraham Lincoln gave notice that he intended to free the slaves held in states still in rebellion against the Union, a promise fulfilled by the Emancipation Proclamation issued on January 1, 1863. The book eventually went out of print

The Heroic Slave, subtitled "A Thrilling Narrative of the Adventures of Madison Washington, in Pursuit of Liberty" is a short piece of fiction written by famous abolitionist Frederick Douglass. When the Rochester Ladies' Anti Slavery Society asked Douglass for a short story to go in their collection, Autographs for Freedom, Douglass responded in turn with The Heroic Slave. The novella, published in 1852, was Douglass' first and only published work of fiction (though he did publish several autobiographical narratives). Frederick Douglass (born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, 1818-1895) was an African- American, born into slavery, who became an editor, orator, author, publisher, statesman and reformer. Douglass was among the most prominent African-Americans of his time, and one of the most influential lecturers and authors in American history. His most well-known work is his first autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845). Critics frequently attacked the book as inauthentic, not believing that a black man could have produced so eloquent a piece of literature. It was an immediate bestseller. He went on to write a second autobiography; My Bondage and My Freedom (1855), his most accomplished account of his life on literary and philosophical terms.
Comments: (6)
Malogamand
Frederick Douglass's 1852 venture into fiction is a short tale of a slave, Madison Washington, and his attempts to escape enslavement and flee to Canada. Along the way, Madison meets Mr. Listwell, a white abolitionist, who befriends him and aids him in his escape. For fear of giving too much away - you'll have to read it for yourself - in the end, we hear of Madison landing on the shores of Nassau, Bahamas.

Although it didn't reach the prominence in anti-slavery fiction as Uncle Tom's Cabin (Thrift Edition) of the same year, The Heroic Slave is substantial in the fact that it was written by distinguished abolitionist, Frederick Douglass.
Yozshunris
Great story. Frederick Douglas was a great orator and writer.
Frlas
Great book, I had to read it for my African American lit class and it felt more like a pleasure than assignment
JOIN
I couldn't put it down. It is actually based on a true story. This is a must-read.
Uylo
Although he is best-known for his autobiographies, the great abolitionist and African American leader Frederick Douglass (1818 - 1895) also wrote an important novel. I learned of it in reading about Douglass. I was pleased to have the opportunity to find the book and to discuss it here. Douglass's novel, in fact an extended short story, is available in this new, inexpensive edition as well as in anthologies of his writings.

Written in 1853, "The Heroic Slave" is among the first works of fiction by an African American. It is based upon a historical incident: the slave mutiny in November,1841 on the American ship, Creole. The Creole had sailed from Richmond with a cargo of 134 slaves to be sold in New Orleans. A slave with the name of Madison Washington escaped his irons and, together with 18 other slaves, took over the ship and sailed it to the British port of Nassau in the Bahamas. The British refused to return the slaves to their owners, and they remained in Nassau as free people. The United States government did not object. Many Americans responded to the incident by debating whether the United States should have been more aggressive in approaching Britain. However, Madison Washington became a hero to many abolitionists, including Douglass. The Creole incident is similar to the better-known slave rebellion involving the Amstead.

Douglass' equates the actions of Madison Washington in commandeering the Creole with the actions of his namesakes, (Madison and Washington) among others, in the Revolutionary War of 1776. Here is how he opens the novel:

"The State of Virginia is famous in American annals for the multitudinous array of her statesmen and heroes. She has been dignified by some the mother of statesmen...... Yet not all the great ones of the Old Dominion have, by the fact of their birth-place escaped undeserved obscurity. By some strange neglect, one of the truest manliest, and bravest of her children .... hold now no higher place in the records of that grand old Commonwealth than is held by a horse or an ox. Let those account for it who can, but there stands the fact, that a man who loved liberty as well as did Patrick Henry, - who deserved it as much as Thomas Jefferson, - and who fought for it with a valor as high, an arm as strong, and against odds as great, as he who led all the armies of the American colonies through the great war for freedom and independence, lives now only in the chattel records of his native State."

Douglass' short novel is in four parts, the last of which recounts the story of Madison Washington and the Creole. In the preceding three parts of the book, Douglass gives an imaginative portrayal of the earlier life of Madison Washington and his struggle for "freedom and independence". The earlier three parts tell of encounters over a space of years between Washington and a white northerner named Listwell. The first encounter was in 1835 when Listwell was traveling in Virginia and, on a Sunday, hears a lone bloodied slave praying and denouncing the inhumanity of his bondage. Listwell does not speak to the man but resolves instead to become an abolitionist and work towards the end of slavery.

In 1840, Listwell and his wife, on their farm in Ohio are approached by a lone traveler who turns out to be Madison Washington. Listwell tells Washington of the earlier encounter in 1835. Washington explains his various attempts at escape and the five years he spent in a swamp before a fire destroyed this site of refuge and threatened him with capture. Listwell helps Washington secure passage on the Underground Railroad to Canada.

Part 3 of the book occurs in 1841. Listwell is again in Virginia and staying at an inn. He observes a long coffle of slaves to be sold and sees Madison Washington among them. Listwell manages a few moments alone with Washington and learns that he was recaptured when he returned to Virginia in a failed attempt to rescue his wife. Listwell is able to smuggle three files to Washington, together with ten dollars, before, the group is put on board the Creole to be sold in New Orleans.

The final part of the book is recounted in the words of the first mate of the Creole, who describes the manly courageous character of Marcus Washington. Washington spared his life, navigated the Creole through a treacherous storm and led the slaves to freedom.. The mate concludes that he will "never endanger my life again in a cause which my conscience does not approve. I dare say here what many men feel, but dare not speak, that this whole slave-trading business is a disgrace and scandal to Old Virginia." The mate also recounts the justification Madison Washington offered for his actions in terms that recall the Revolution:

"God is my witness that LIBERTY, not malice, is the motive for this night's work. I have done no more to those dead men yonder, than they would have done to me in like circumstances. We have struck for our freedom, and if a true man's heart be in you, you win honor us for the deed. We have done that which you applaud your fathers for doing, and if we are murderers, so were they."

This short, eloquent novel speaks of the value of independence, freedom, and courage. The novel has been compared to Stowe's "Uncle Tom's Cabin" which had appeared about a year earlier. The best parallel to the book, however, is Melville's masterful story of a slave mutiny, "Benito Cereno" Benito Cereno (Bedford College Editions) which appeared in 1855, two years after Douglass' book. Readers interested in American literature or in the African American experience will enjoy getting to know Douglass' "Heroic Slave".

Robin Friedman
Mash
Frederick Douglass was one of the foremost leaders of the abolitionist movement, which fought to end slavery within the United States in the decades prior to the Civil War.

A brilliant speaker, Douglass was asked by the American Anti-Slavery Society to engage in a tour of lectures, and so became recognized as one of America's first great black speakers. He won world fame when his autobiography was publicized in 1845. Two years later he bagan publishing an antislavery paper called the North Star.

Douglass served as an adviser to President Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War and fought for the adoption of constitutional amendments that guaranteed voting rights and other civil liberties for blacks. Douglass provided a powerful voice for human rights during this period of American history and is still revered today for his contributions against racial injustice.