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eBook Conflicting Commitments: The Politics of Enforcing Immigrant Worker Rights in San Jose and Houston download

by Shannon Gleeson

eBook Conflicting Commitments: The Politics of Enforcing Immigrant Worker Rights in San Jose and Houston download ISBN: 0801451213
Author: Shannon Gleeson
Publisher: ILR Press; 1 edition (October 30, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1314 kb
Fb2: 1629 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lit mobi lrf mobi
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

In Conflicting Commitments, Shannon Gleeson goes beyond the debate over federal immigration policy to. .This book provides a detailed analysis of the practical dimensions of workers' labor rights in San Jose, California, and Houston, Texas.

In Conflicting Commitments, Shannon Gleeson goes beyond the debate over federal immigration policy to examine the complicated terrain of immigrant worker rights. Federal law requires that basic labor standards apply to all workers. offers proposals for 'making rights real' for undocumented workers and creating procedures for enforceable claims. As the study shows, the task is administratively complex and politically problematic. Summing Up: Recommended.

In Conflicting Commitments, Shannon Gleeson goes beyondthe debate . This book has offered tools for understanding the process of enforcing rights

In Conflicting Commitments, Shannon Gleeson goes beyondthe debate over federal immigration policy to examine thecomplicated terrain of immigrant worker rights. 3 Place Matters: How Local Governments Enforce Immigrant Worker Rights. This book has offered tools for understanding the process of enforcing rights. There is often a wide gap between formal protections and the experiences of rights holders, and as Tilly (1990) argues, in the absence of effective enforcement, rights cannot be said to exist. Federal law requires that basic labor standards apply to all workers, yet this principle clashes with increasingly restrictive immigration laws and creates a confusing bureaucratic terrain for local policymakers and labor advocates. Gleeson examines this issue in two of the largest immigrant gateways in the country: San Jose, California, and Houston, Texas

13) On one side of the divide sits anti-immigration law, with its "increasingly robust immigration enforcement apparatus," (14) and on the other sits domestic human rights law, with its "sustained rights for undocumented immigrant workers.

Shannon Gleeson is the author of Conflicting Commitments: The Politics of Enforcing . Matt Grossman and David A. Hopkins, Asymmetric Politics: Ideological Republicans and Group Interestadded 2 years ago.

Shannon Gleeson is the author of Conflicting Commitments: The Politics of Enforcing Immigrant Worker Rights in San Jose and Houston (Cornell University Press, 2012).

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: With undocumented workers constituting up to 5 percent of the . Conflicting Commitments: The Politics of Enforcing Immigrant Worker Rights in San Jose and Houston by Shannon Gleeson.

immigrant gateway cities. Shannon Gleeson's approach is careful and nuanced, and the comparative methodology produces rich analytic dividends. The city-level focus is particularly timely, given the current political impasse on immigration reform at the national level and the proliferation of state and local government initiatives in this area.

The Political Psychology of the Gulf War: Leaders, Publics, and the Process of Conflict. This report outlines the status of foreign law in Tunisia. It explains that the application of conflicts rules in Tunisia is always mandatory for the judge

The Political Psychology of the Gulf War: Leaders, Publics, and the Process of Conflict. It explains that the application of conflicts rules in Tunisia is always mandatory for the judge. However, these rules are imperative for the parties to the extent that the object of the dispute is a category of rights that the parties cannot dispose of freely. Foreign law is treated as law and not fact; and Tunisian judges, without being. obligated to, have the power to ascertain, with the assistance of the parties when necessary, the content of the foreign law.

Conflicting Commitments: The Politics of Enforcing Immigrant Worker Rights in San Jose and Houston. Agnieszka Kubal, "Conflicting Commitments: The Politics of Enforcing Immigrant Worker Rights in San Jose and Houston by Shannon Gleeson," American Journal of Sociology 119, no. 3 (November 2013): 854-856. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. On the Relation Between Sociology and Ethics. Eviction and the Reproduction of Urban Poverty.

Request PDF On Apr 16, 2014, Park and others published Conflicting commitments: the politics of.

In case of violating such right; especially by a foreign person, the issue shall be represented in determining the law applicable, while there is three opinions assumes the application of law of country of origin, law of country claiming the protection. and the personal law of the author Thereupon, the purpose for this study is to clarify these opinions and determine the most applied opinion; namely, the law of Country of Origin.

In Conflicting Commitments, Shannon Gleeson goes beyond the debate over federal immigration policy to examine the complicated terrain of immigrant worker rights. Federal law requires that basic labor standards apply to all workers, yet this principle clashes with increasingly restrictive immigration laws and creates a confusing bureaucratic terrain for local policymakers and labor advocates. Gleeson examines this issue in two of the largest immigrant gateways in the country: San Jose, California, and Houston, Texas.

Conflicting Commitments reveals two cities with very different approaches to addressing the exploitation of immigrant workers―both involving the strategic coordination of a range of bureaucratic brokers, but in strikingly different ways. Drawing on the real life accounts of ordinary workers, federal, state, and local government officials, community organizers, and consular staff, Gleeson argues that local political contexts matter for protecting undocumented workers in particular. Providing a rich description of the bureaucratic minefields of labor law, and the explosive politics of immigrant rights, Gleeson shows how the lessons learned from San Jose and Houston can inform models for upholding labor and human rights in the United States.