carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Guantanamo: Violation of Human Rights and International Law? (Point of View-point of Law)

eBook Guantanamo: Violation of Human Rights and International Law? (Point of View-point of Law) download

by Not Available

eBook Guantanamo: Violation of Human Rights and International Law? (Point of View-point of Law) download ISBN: 9287162948
Author: Not Available
Publisher: Council of Europe (August 1, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 110
ePub: 1778 kb
Fb2: 1542 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lrf txt azw lrf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Points of view - Points of Law. Guantánamo: violation of human rights .

Applicability of international humanitarian law A. Character of the armed conflict B. Categories of persons concerned. V. Applicability of human rights treaties.

This book contains all the Assembly's arguments, along with the study by the Venice Commission, which brings . States in Afghanistan or in Guantánamo Bay1 Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights Rapporteur: Mr Kevin McNamara, United Kingdom, Socialist Group.

This book contains all the Assembly's arguments, along with the study by the Venice Commission, which brings all its legal expertise to bear in considering whether the detention of people by the United States in Guantánamo Bay is lawful and if there is a need for a change in international la. Summary In this report the Assembly deplores the fate and the treatment of persons, includ- ing minors, being held in Afghanistan or Guantánamo Bay, whom the United States designates as unlawful combatants.

What are the rights of the prisoners held by the United States at the base in Guantanamo Bay? Is their imprisonment lawful? Should we be thinking about strengthening the Geneva Conventions and changing international law? The Parliamentary Assembly, and hence the 47 member states o. .

What are the rights of the prisoners held by the United States at the base in Guantanamo Bay? Is their imprisonment lawful? Should we be thinking about strengthening the Geneva Conventions and changing international law? The Parliamentary Assembly, and hence the 47 member states of the Council of Europe, has spoken with one voice, condemning this flagrant violation of human rights and demanding the closure of the Guantanamo detention centre.

Human Rights is a legitimate subject for international law, and international scrutinyiii. Law enforcement officials shall report violations of those laws, codes and sets of principles which protect and promote human rightsx. Law enforcement officials are obliged to know, and to apply, international standards for human rightsiv. Ethical and Legal Conduct. Human rights derive from the inherent dignity of the human personv. Law enforcement officials shall at all times respect and obey the lawvi. All police action shall respect the principles of legality, necessity, non-discrimination, proportionality and humanityxi. Policing in Democracies.

Yet, the law of armed conflict is almost completely silent on the subject

Yet, the law of armed conflict is almost completely silent on the subject.

The mandate for this mission is explicitly limited to violations of international human rights and humanitarian law by Israel, and does not include violations by Hamas and other Palestinian armed groups.

However, it is debatable whether human rights law could and should apply to acts of terrorists, as such acts are perpetrated mostly b.

Terrorist acts have occurred frequently throughout the history of human civilization. The final part of the book explores the distinctive prohibitions and crime of 'terrorism' in armed conflict under international humanitarian law. View. However, it is debatable whether human rights law could and should apply to acts of terrorists, as such acts are perpetrated mostly by non-state actors.

Our views reflect Human Rights Watch’s experience of over twenty years . They certainly deserve all of the rights and privileges that would accrue to somebody who is obeying the laws and customs of war.

Our views reflect Human Rights Watch’s experience of over twenty years in applying the Geneva Conventions of 1949 to armed conflicts around the world. Article 17 of the Third Geneva Convention provides that POWs shall not be exposed to any unpleasant or disadvantageous treatment of any kind for their refusal to provide information beyond their name, rank, serial number, and date of birth. And they carry a card.