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by Paul Gilroy

eBook The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double-Consciousness download ISBN: 0674076052
Author: Paul Gilroy
Publisher: Harvard University Press (September 1, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 280
ePub: 1162 kb
Fb2: 1221 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lit mbr docx rtf
Category: Political
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Awards & Accolades. Paul Gilroy Is Winner of the 2019 Holberg International Memorial Prize.

Challenging the practices and assumptions of cultural studies, The Black Atlantic also enriches our understanding of modernism. See all Product description. Customers who bought this item also bought.

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Double consciousness is a term describing the internal conflict experienced by subordinated groups in an oppressive society. The Black Atlantic : Modernity and Double Consciousness, Paul Gilroy. It was coined by W. E. B. Du Bois with reference to African American "double consciousness", including his own, and published in the autoethnographic work, The Souls of Black Folk. The term originally referred to the psychological challenge of "always looking at one's self through the eyes" of a racist white society, and "measuring oneself by the means of a nation.

The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness is a 1993 history book about a distinct black Atlantic culture that incorporated elements from African, American, British, and Caribbean cultures. It was written by Paul Gilroy and was published by Harvard University Press and Verso Books. Listing at Verso Books.

In The Black Atlantic, Gilroy offers a model both for reconsidering the history of ideas in the modern West and for understanding how a putative margin moves to the . The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness. Cambridge: Harvard University Pres, 1992.

In The Black Atlantic, Gilroy offers a model both for reconsidering the history of ideas in the modern West and for understanding how a putative margin moves to the center once we examine how a small but intense group of writers and performers attach their scholarly or aesthetic considerations to the lived experience of a social group.

delving into the double consciousness blacks experienced living in two cultures, gilroy argues that blacks were no strangers to. .The book The Black Atlantic deals with the journeys of . DuBois and Richard Wright

delving into the double consciousness blacks experienced living in two cultures, gilroy argues that blacks were no strangers to modernity in europe and the americas, that modernity was not exclusive to whites, and that europe and the americas benefited from the contributions of blacks, slave, traveler, and citizen alike. the writers, frederick douglass and richard wright, and their books, are given chapters, as is the fisk choir, and, more recently, the record in the hands of producers and performers of the hip hop generations. DuBois and Richard Wright. Gilroy explains that contact with Europe were seminal for both authors.

There is, Paul Gilroy tells us, a culture that is not specifically African, American, Caribbean, or British, but all of.Whilst others scarcely put a toe in the water, in The Black Atlantic Gilroy goes in deep and returns with riches. Guardian Afrocentrism, Eurocentrism, Caribbean Studies.

There is, Paul Gilroy tells us, a culture that is not specifically African, American, Caribbean, or British, but all of these at once; a black Atlantic culture whose themes and techniques transcend ethnicity and nationality to produce something new and, until now, unremarked. Challenging the practices and assumptions of cultural studies, The Black Atlantic also enriches our understanding of modernism.

The Black Atlantic - Gilroy, Paul. Gilroy's main contribution to scholarship is that by inserting black people as central participants in the creation of the modern world he thereby rewrites the history of modernity and modernism. Spike Lee and Jazzie . Walter Benjamin and the Jubilee Singers, Sonia Boyce and Keith Piper, Richard Wright, Theodor Adorno, .

Afrocentrism. Eurocentrism. Caribbean Studies. British Studies. To the forces of cultural nationalism hunkered down in their camps, this bold hook sounds a liberating call. There is,Paul Gilroy tells us, a culture that is not specifically African, American, Caribbean, or British, but all of these at once, a black Atlantic culture whose themes and techniques transcend ethnicity and nationality to produce something new and, until now, unremarked. Challenging the practices and assumptions of cultural studies, The Black Atlantic also complicates and enriches our understanding of modernism.

Debates about postmodernism have cast an unfashionable pall over questions of historical periodization. Gilroy bucks this trend by arguing that the development of black culture in the Americas arid Europe is a historical experience which can be called modern for a number of clear and specific reasons. For Hegel, the dialectic of master and slave was integral to modernity, and Gilroy considers the implications of this idea for a transatlantic culture. In search of a poetics reflecting the politics and history of this culture, he takes us on a transatlantic tour of the music that, for centuries, has transmitted racial messages and feeling around the world, from the Jubilee Singers in the nineteenth century to Jimi Hendrix to rap. He also explores this internationalism as it is manifested in black writing from the "double consciousness" of W. E. B. Du Bois to the "double vision" of Richard Wright to the compelling voice of Toni Morrison.

In a final tour de force, Gilroy exposes the shared contours of black and Jewish concepts of diaspora in order both to establish a theoretical basis for healing rifts between blacks and Jews in contemporary culture and to further define the central theme of his book: that blacks have shaped a nationalism, if not a nation, within the shared culture of the black Atlantic.

Comments: (7)
Todal
gilroy writes of forms of transmission, historically describing communication of experience and culture by blacks from periods of history when direct communication was regimented, curtailed and silenced up to the post-literate musical culture of the twentieth century.

during slavery, ways of communication were found in song and dance, in utterance and gesture. in the case of margaret garner, an escaped slave on trail for killing her child, the violence of slavery and its effects were made known in several forms: the act of infancide, the publication of the act through the media, personal published accounts such as in a memoir by an abolitionist, levi coffin, the championing of the case by a noted suffragist of the day, lucy stoner, and, a century later, continued by the fictionalization of margaret garner's story by toni morrison in her novel, Beloved.

gilroy looks at two forms of transmission, sea travel and the artifact: books, records, and choirs. situating his book in the countries on the continents connected by the atlantic ocean, africa, europe and the north and south americas, he touches on communication on slave ships from africa, with deeper probing into communication by 19th century free black intellectuals, those fortunate to travel to other countries, and communication by blacks during the slave trade, free and enslaved, who worked on ships. for gilroy, the travels resulted in interaction, and the exchange and transmission of ideas.

delving into the double consciousness blacks experienced living in two cultures, gilroy argues that blacks were no strangers to modernity in europe and the americas, that modernity was not exclusive to whites, and that europe and the americas benefited from the contributions of blacks, slave, traveler, and citizen alike.

the writers, frederick douglass and richard wright, and their books, are given chapters, as is the fisk choir, and, more recently, the record in the hands of producers and performers of the hip hop generations.

although gilroy has included some interesting stories of black intellectuals that should appeal to the general reader, a word to the wise, The Black Atlantic is work by a serious scholar, highly researched, and part of an informed conversation among black intellectuals.
Cobyno
An important book for anyone who enjoys black history and social constructs. Used in a class in Graduate School and Gilroy is very eloquent but a boatload of difficult words even for Master level students so have a dictionary at hand....
Swiang
This book turns historical methodology upside down and introduces transnational methodology, among other things. A must-read for all new historians learning methodology.
Vonalij
The turn from class politics to identity politics and from „Western Marxism” to post-Structuralist deconstruction in the 1980s appeared to me as a de-politicization of the intellectual discourse and probably also as an effect of the historical defeat of the Left against Neoliberal “There is no Alternative” ideology. Of course there were the exceptional works of Judith Butler, which demonstrated the powder keg implied in deconstruction. But as Literature Theory and Cultural Studies are concerned I saw (and still do) their development from the 1970s to the 1990s rather as a descent into academic institutionalisation and political irrelevance.
Peter Gilroy’s “The Black Atlantic” is one of the books that could perhaps change my mind. Coming from a family of Caribbean immigrants to London, Gilroy is both European and black, a black Englishman. Being a black Englishman is in fact a provocation against modern racism per se. While racist and nationalist discourses describe those identities as mutually exclusive, Gilroy is interested in ambiguities and the space between them and finds a whole new world. Gilroy very much builds on W.E.B. Du Bois’ book “The Souls of Black Folk” (1903) and the theory of a “double consciousness”.
Gilroy settles on the image of ships in motion and across the Atlantic, the “Black Atlantic”. Gilroy discovers a new continent “in between”. This is the world of Oluadah Equiano and the black Chartists Cuffay and Wedderburn. Did you know that at the end of the eighteenth century a quarter of the British navy was composed of Africans? Gilroy wants to overcome nationalist approaches and argues cultural historians could take the Atlantic as one single unit of analysis and produce an explicitly transnational and intercultural perspective. The book “The Black Atlantic” deals with the journeys of W.E.B. DuBois and Richard Wright. Gilroy explains that contact with Europe were seminal for both authors. Gilroy uses the concept of “Diaspora” instead of the pan-African discourse.
Gilroy was a scholar at the famous Birmingham Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies. He asks critical questions about the association of Cultural Studies with “Englishness” in the works of Raymond Williams and E.P. Thompson. He strongly advocates breaking away from the idea of a left English nationalism. Gilroy wants to break the dogmatic focus on discrete national dynamics and sharply criticizes the “morbid celebration of England and Englishness” in the works of Raymond Williams. Gilroy deals with the painting “The Slave Ship” by J.M.W. Turner and its owner John Ruskin. He demonstrates the complicity of Williams’ national canon of conservative anti-industrialists with slavery. This is a sharp critique of Williams’ famous book “Culture and Society”.
Gilroy likes to talk of the Jamaica migrants in Britain as “black settlers” and uses a notion usually reserved for white English colonists in America for black immigrants in England. He is interested in the hybridity and intermixture of ideas. He shows the important role black slaves played in the development of the English labour movement and the important role of Hegelian philosophy in the work of W.E.D. DuBois.
Gilroy discovers a complicity of racialized reason and white supremacist terror. He mentions the racist prejudices of Kant, Voltaire, and Burke. In Gilroy’s account black vernacular culture has become a sort of post-modernism “avant la lettre”.
Gilroy develops his arguments with black music as the expression of the unspeakable terrors of slavery. The main chapters of the book deal with W.E.B Du Bois’ and Richard Wright’s journeys to Bismarck’s Germany and France. I believe it would make sense to read at least Du Bois’ “The Soul of Black Folks” and Richard Wright’s “Native Son” before tackling “The Black Atlantic”. Anyway, after reading “The Black Atlantic” I have to change my reading lists.
Mr.mclav
As described and shipped rapidly.
Sagda
As advertised.